Reputation
435
Top tag
Next privilege 500 Rep.
Access review queues
Badges
2 9 22
Newest
 Necromancer
Impact
~111k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 81 votes cast
Apr
7
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
7
awarded  Yearling
Apr
1
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
25
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
13
accepted Do I need a junction box for a hardwired stove?
Dec
12
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
25
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
20
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
5
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
30
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Aug
30
answered What is the purpose of a bathroom exhaust fan?
Aug
30
comment Electrical breakers question
I understand the relationship between watts, amps, and volts. But by your logic it seems correct to say that standard US residential circuits are wired 1800A 1V, which would not be correct, would it? I think your answer would be clear if you were to remove the sentence, "Theoretically if both poles are drawing 100 Amps the total Amps being consumed and read at the meter is 200 Amps, Watts=Volts*Amps."
Aug
30
comment Electrical breakers question
No part of your statement about reading 200A makes sense to me, which is why I expressed my confusion at this explanation. My meter reads kWh, not amps.
Aug
30
comment Can two 30 ampere circuits be combined in an outlet?
@Ecnerwal my understanding is that the stove requires a minimum of 40A, not that it must be installed on a circuit that trips at 40A. But aside from that, why would a 60A supply to a 40A stove be unacceptable? I thought the purpose of a breaker was to protect the wiring from being overloaded and catching fire, not to protect whatever device is connected. The device should not depend on the breaker for over-current protection; it should have its own fuse or breaker if necessary.
Aug
30
comment Electrical breakers question
I've seen this type of explanation before and it seems backwards and misleading. From what I understand, you will not measure 200A anywhere on the line in your example scenario. Rather, you're drawing 100A@120V on one pole and returning 100A@120V on the other pole. Because of the phase difference, you'll measure 100A@240V across both poles, not 200A@120V.
Jun
4
comment What type of woodworking clamp is this?
@AdamDavis In the dog hole use-cases, holdfasts (which you set and release with a hammer) have started to surge in popularity due to their ease of use. In other applications, various types of quick clamps and gear clamps and cam clamps are popular. Various types of permanently-attached bench vises, as well as removable Moxon vises, are also popular.
Jun
1
comment Is there a good reason NOT to reuse the power cord when replacing my electric range/oven?
Just to follow up, it turned out my old stove was hardwired, with a really heavy gauge cord running to a loose junction box then wires in metal flex conduit running from the junction box to the stove. I removed the old junction box and the flex conduit and its wiring, wired the really heavy gauge cord into a $6 receptacle and secured it, then bought a $20 cord and plug for the stove.
Jun
1
comment Is there a good reason NOT to reuse the power cord when replacing my electric range/oven?
I found that 4-wire (3+ground) is only required in new construction per the NEC. As it turned out, my old stove was hardwired but I wasn't comfortable reusing that wire so I installed a 3-wire receptacle and installed a new 3-wire plug on the new stove.
May
29
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
8
comment Sash window design / security - parting bead vulnerable to attack?
Also feel free to open a meta discussion asking for a more in-depth discussion of why this question should or should not be considered on-topic.