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Apr
27
comment How can I fix the issues I'm having with large double gates?
Your gates look exactly like mine, which are sagging in the same way. Thanks for asking this question. I note that you did not give a picture of the hinges. I had to increase the size of the hinges on mine, which were too small for the load. That helped somewhat.
Apr
26
comment Tripping Breaker
Also, let's suppose that it is a faulty breaker, for the sake of argument. The fault is failing to the safe mode. That is, the failure is that it is trying too hard to keep you safe. If you suspect that the breaker might be faulty then for heavens sake don't turn it back on. The assumption that the breaker is faulty means that you do not know if it will start failing to the dangerous mode; the mode where it tries not hard enough to keep you safe.
Apr
26
comment Tripping Breaker
Regardless of whether the fault is in the breaker, the wiring, or an appliance, you have an electrical fault that is bad enough that the safety system that prevents your house from burning down has been activated. If you don't know how to diagnose such a fault yourself then find an expert who does.
Feb
29
comment Outside electrical outlet doesn't work after pressure washing
Exercise caution. I once had a leak of a garden faucet pipe inside a wall onto an external GFCI-protected plug. The water was sufficient to cause a short within the fixture, but because there was no ground fault, the GFCI did not trip, and even if it had, there was still enough water inside the fixture to short the hot to the neutral. The resulting current was high enough to heat the plastic parts inside to melting, and not high enough to trip the breaker. This was a perfect storm of safety system failures; fortunately I smelled the plastic melting and killed the power to the house.
Feb
24
comment Is notching a flange on an I-Joist ever acceptable?
Count yourself lucky. When I bought my house the bathtub -- which plainly had been added after the house was built -- had the drain going completely through the joist, which had been simply cut away entirely so that it was bearing on nothing. "What is holding up the bathtub?" I asked the contractor who was going to remove it as soon as possible. "Hope?" he said. A bathtub weighs a heck of a lot when it is full of water and a person. I am astonished that it did not damage the framing further.
Feb
19
comment What can I do “spread” load on breaker for single bedroom?
@yo': Indeed; another reason for this is because you don't want to be in a situation where an electrical fault in, oh, I don't know, maybe the circular saw that you're holding right now also causes the lights to go out. Because then you'd be standing in the dark with a spinning, faulty power tool. You don't want to make the situation worse by cutting the power to the lights too.
Jan
8
comment Can I take a 220 line and convert it to a regular house outlet what would be the damage?
Kitchens require GFCIs by code in many places; how is this going to work with a GFCI? The current on the neutral and the hot is going to almost always be different.
Jan
5
awarded  Critic
Dec
10
comment Safe/professional way to transport lumber with just a roof rack
Good question, and some good answers. I would encourage you to learn how to tie a Trucker Hitch, which is the knot used to tie a load to a vehicle. It looks complicated but when you break it down it is quite simple; a loop on the standing part allows you to make an impromptu pulley to tighten the line with advantage, and the knot is secured with two simple half hitches. People often think that knots are more complicated than they are; knowing which simple knot to use for a given task is a useful skill.
Dec
5
comment Adding a new dimmer switch to old wiring?
Whoever wired the switch originally was lazy and neglected to put black paint or tape on that white wire; the reason to do this is precisely to ensure that future homeowners don't have to ask your question! You might fix that person's mistake and color the wire appropriately.
Apr
3
comment Voltage fluctuations and GFCI tripping drivng me crazy
@ThreePhaseEel: Good point; I was neglecting the fact that the neutral wire is a very low-resistance resistor.
Apr
3
comment Voltage fluctuations and GFCI tripping drivng me crazy
@SomeGuy: Then I am confused, because it seems that we agree that a volt meter will show no voltage on the neutral wire. Yet you claim there is such a voltage, because there is a current. Can you describe an experiment that would measure the AC voltage that you claim is on the neutral wire?
Apr
2
revised Voltage fluctuations and GFCI tripping drivng me crazy
added 446 characters in body
Apr
2
comment Voltage fluctuations and GFCI tripping drivng me crazy
@SomeGuy: My prediction is that current will be nonzero -- about half an amp, AC -- on on both the hot and neutral sides, and voltage will be 120VAC on the hot side and 0VAC on the neutral side. And therefore there is current on the neutral without any voltage. Do you agree or disagree with this prediction? If you disagree, what is your prediction? When you post your prediction, I will attempt the experiment and we will see who is right.
Apr
2
comment Voltage fluctuations and GFCI tripping drivng me crazy
@SomeGuy: Well, clearly we disagree, but we can settle it with science. Run a black wire from a 120VAC breaker to a current meter, then to a 60W light bulb. Then run a white wire from the bulb to a second current meter and then from the current meter to the neutral bus. (Current meters must be installed in series.) Measure the current on the hot and neutral sides. Now remove the current meters and run wires from the white and black wire connections on the bulb to two volt meters, and then attach both volt meters to the safety ground.
Mar
13
comment Attach net/hammock to interior walls
The true tension force you need to overcome is therefore somewhere between 400 pounds at a minimum, and infinity at a maximum, depending on the angle at which you want the hammock to make when loaded. What is that angle? a 400 pound load with an angle of five degrees supplies the equivalent of 5000 pounds of force to the wall, so it matters a lot. Do a web search for "sling angle factor" for charts showing the amount of extra force supplied as a factor of angle.
Mar
13
comment Attach net/hammock to interior walls
Something to keep in mind is that the angle at which the hammock lies when under load dramatically changes the tension force which is applied by the hammock to the walls. Imagine for example you wanted no deflection whatsoever from a horizontal line when the hammock is loaded. Obviously the hammock would have to be infinitely tensioned for that to happen. Now imagine you suspended the hammock from the ceiling straight down, so the angle was purely vertical; clearly the tension with a 400 pound weight is 400 pounds of tension.
Mar
13
comment Is Duck/Duct tape safe to use to insulate mains wires?
Can you more clearly describe the circumstances under which you have non insulated mains wires?
Mar
13
comment water backing up into both sinks, whether running the disposal or dishwasher
You've described a scenario, but you forgot to ask a question. What's your question? "I need help" isn't a question; what specifically do you want to know?
Dec
22
awarded  Peer Pressure