526 reputation
46
bio website ericlippert.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Jul 1 at 20:35

Eric Lippert develops C# analyzers at Coverity. During his sixteen years at Microsoft he was a developer of the Visual Basic, VBScript, JScript and C# compilers and a member of the C# language design committee; he is now a C# MVP. He is on Twitter at "@ericlippert" and writes a blog about programming language design and other fabulous adventures in coding at http://ericlippert.com.


Jun
17
revised Voltage fluctuations and GFCI ripping drivng me crazy
added 261 characters in body
Jun
17
comment Voltage fluctuations and GFCI ripping drivng me crazy
@Tester101: Right, that's how it should be done, assuming you're going to do it at all, which I think is a bad idea. In taking apart my hundred-year-old house I have found many places where the previous owners made let us say questionable choices regarding the wiring. In my particular case the Edison circuit was originally run to a fuse box, not breakers. I don't know how you correctly wire a fuse box with an Edison circuit, but whomever upgraded it to a breaker box did not do so correctly either. Best to assume it is wrong until proven correct!
Jun
17
comment Voltage fluctuations and GFCI ripping drivng me crazy
@Tester101: Correct me if I'm wrong, but that's assuming that the circuit was set up with the two hots "split phase". Given the idiocy of the homeowner wiring I've had to deal with thus far, I wouldn't be surprised if the two hots came from the same phase.
Jun
16
revised Voltage fluctuations and GFCI ripping drivng me crazy
added 76 characters in body
Jun
16
answered Voltage fluctuations and GFCI ripping drivng me crazy
Apr
29
comment Hooking up a 50A hot tub breaker to a 60A subpanel
Note also that the load from the pumps is likely to be inductive. Think of inductive loads as being like adding a water balloon into the middle of a hose: as it expands the water at the source is not making it to the business end, and when the hose goes off, the water keeps flowing as the balloon empties. Inductive loads can draw extra current when they start up and produce voltage spikes when they shut down, and that can sometimes cause breakers to trip unexpectedly.
Apr
28
comment How do I remove a brass pipe that has been jammed into a larger iron pipe?
Once again proving that everyone who lived in your house before you was crazy. I just hope to not be the next owner's crazy guy.
Mar
13
comment How can I increase water pressure after installing dual-head shower?
I installed a similar system a couple of days ago and am having a similar problem, so thanks for asking this so I didn't have to! Some on the internet suggest removing the flow restrictors which are immediately on the inside of the showerhead. I found this did not help appreciably in my case but you might give it a try.
Jan
31
comment If neutral carries current back to the breaker panel, why doesn't it need to be connected to a switch?
@derobert: Correct, though this is a subtlety that I thought might not be worth digging into given that the original poster is still sussing out the difference between voltage and current. A good analogy is that voltage is like height. "Absolute" height - distance from the center of the earth - is a completely inconvenient measure. Height as we use it conventionally is the difference between two things, called the "bottom" and the "top". When we don't explicitly say what the bottom point is then you have to know whether the speaker intends mean sea level or local ground level or what.
Jan
28
awarded  Commentator
Jan
28
comment Why little holes/dots when I apply joint compound?
And your initial job looks reasonable. Let it dry thoroughly; maybe aim a fan at it if you want to speed it along. Sand it down and do a second and then third coat, sanding between. Stir the compound thoroughly before you put it on; that will help.
Jan
28
comment Why little holes/dots when I apply joint compound?
I would add to the good answers that: if you're spackling, use spackle. If you're joining wallboard, use wallboard joint compound. They're not the same thing. Spackle doesn't shrink when it dries but is hard to feather around the edges of a large hole. Joint compound does shrink and is intended to be applied over large areas in multiple coats.
Jan
28
comment If neutral carries current back to the breaker panel, why doesn't it need to be connected to a switch?
@user19512: You did confuse voltage with current again but you are on the right track. Remember, the voltage on the neutral is zero; it's the current you have to worry about because its the current that can make the wire get warm enough to burn. An edison circuit can lead to overcurrent on the neutral because most people think that the neutral should be the same gauge as the hot; but that's only true if the current is the same. Worse: the overcurrent protection -- the breakers -- is on the hots!
Jan
28
comment If neutral carries current back to the breaker panel, why doesn't it need to be connected to a switch?
@Tester101: So clearly you know why an Edison circuit (ie, two hots one neutral) is dangerous; I'm wondering if the original poster can suss out why.
Jan
28
comment If neutral carries current back to the breaker panel, why doesn't it need to be connected to a switch?
@Tester101: You are right. Let's suppose that we're in a normal US household with 240V one phase power split in half, so half the panel appears out of phase with the other half. What are the possibilities?
Jan
27
revised If neutral carries current back to the breaker panel, why doesn't it need to be connected to a switch?
added 155 characters in body
Jan
27
answered If neutral carries current back to the breaker panel, why doesn't it need to be connected to a switch?
Oct
27
awarded  Yearling
Oct
27
awarded  Yearling
Dec
2
answered What did I do wrong??! Wiring error is tripping circuit breaker