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2h
comment Thermostat replacement
I found a similar Honeywell thermostat, and it appears the first terminal on the right is W-O/B. This is worrisome, since it appears your system uses both the W and O. I'm not sure what the O is used for in your application, but you might want to do some poking around in the furnace to find out. What were the final connections you made to get it working? Is it working properly now?
21h
comment Thermostat replacement
You should create an answer yourself. Include everything you did, and possibly some photos of the before and after. This information could be useful to future visitors. I'm glad the information I provided was helpful.
1d
comment Thermostat replacement
Maybe it is a heat pump then. In which case, the orange wire is used to switch the reversing valve to cooling mode.
1d
comment Thermostat replacement
Can't see the labels on the new thermostat.
1d
comment Thermostat replacement
Then you don't have a heat pump. Hook it up white to W, yellow to Y, green to G, orange to W2 or O depending on how it's wired in the furnace. Do you have 2 stage heat?
1d
comment Thermostat replacement
Do you have a heat pump, and a furnace as a backup? Or do you use the furnace for heating, and a condensing unit outside for cooling?
1d
comment Thermostat replacement
Can't see the labels on the old board, since the wires are in the way. Typically W is the white wire, and is used to call for heat. Y uses the yellow wire, and is used to call for cool. The sure fire way to determine which wires go where, is to go to the air handler and see where they all connect.
1d
comment Thermostat replacement
You should read and follow the documentation that comes with the new thermostat. The L terminal is usually used for some type of indicator (usually a light), and may not be on all thermostats. If this is for a heat pump system, the O terminal will control the reversing valve. When it's energized the system should be in cooling mode, when it's not the system is in heating mode. If there is a jumper from O to L, my guess would be that there's some type of light that indicates the current mode.
2d
comment I have 220V cable on a 110V circuit. Should I be worried?
@TOB you could use a [micrometer]( en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micrometer) to measure them, or look for printing on the insulation which should list the size.
2d
comment How to build a porch
This seems a bit too broad. If you have a specific question about building a porch, we might be able to help. Explaining how to build a porch from start to finish, does not fit the "short" answer format.
2d
comment I have 220V cable on a 110V circuit. Should I be worried?
It appears to be a two wire cable (plus ground). If the OP wants a 120V circuit, they won't want to use a double pole breaker. They'll want to replace the 40 or 50 ampere double pole breaker, with a 20 ampere single pole breaker. Then they'll connect the black wire to the breaker, and the white wire to the grounded "neutral" bus bar. This is of course if the breaker is listed to accept the size conductor being used. I think most 20 amp breakers accept up to #8, but you'd have to check the label.
2d
comment What could cause low hot water pressure in the shower only?
"water was only coming out of the left hole"? The object you linked to is a mixing valve. Hot water should be going in the left "hole", not coming out of it. Hot goes in the left, cold goes in the right, and a mixture of the two comes out the bottom or top.
2d
comment Can I count on being able to cut galvanized pipe to size?
Not many folks can make good clean cuts with a reciprocating saw. They're designed more for demolition, than for making finished cuts.
2d
comment What size wire do I need for a 100amp underground 300 ft run?
@Ryan you said the terminals are 60/75, so you can use the 75 column.
2d
comment What size wire do I need for a 100amp underground 300 ft run?
NEC recommends (but does not require) a maximum of 5% voltage drop from service to consumer. So you'll probably want to try and design the system to reduce voltage drop as much as possible.
2d
comment What size wire do I need for a 100amp underground 300 ft run?
If this is a simple one man shop, it's not likely you'll be welding while you cut things on the table saw. The lights will always (or usually) be on while you're working, so you'll have to figure for that. However, for the most part, you won't be drawing anywhere near the 100 ampere capacity. Which means you'll probably never have a problem using #3 conductors. If you often have helpers, and you'll be using the welder and table saw simultaneously. You might want to bump up the wire size, to reduce the voltage drop across the long wire run.
2d
comment What size wire do I need for a 100amp underground 300 ft run?
Without knowing more about the equipment that will be connected to the panel, it's difficult to give an accurate answer.
2d
comment What size wire do I need for a 100amp underground 300 ft run?
Only if you care about power quality. 300' of #3 uncoated copper @ 100 amperes, will have a voltage drop of 14.7 volts. So if the panel is fully loaded (drawing 100 amperes), and you have 240 volts at the service equipment panel, you'll end up with 225.3 volts at the panel. And that's at the panel. You'll loose even more along the branch circuits. If the panel is only drawing 50% of the max (50 amperes), you'll only loose 7.35 volts. This is why load calculations are important, they allow you to figure out what wiring is required.
2d
comment What size wire do I need for a 100amp underground 300 ft run?
This answer might be helpful.
Jul
28
comment What to do about hot neutral in switch?
Some photos, or a diagram of the wiring would be helpful.