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Jun
17
revised What dangers are there with disturbed asbestos drywall?
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Jun
17
comment When to use holes instead of side terminals to wire an outlet
If you look at the warnings on those things carefully, they specifically tell you not to reuse the QuickWire clamps. Once you've inserted and released a wire once, you're side-wiring; that's a major reason they're pretty much gone in new switches.
Jun
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Oct
16
answered Is it OK for OSB3 boards to get wet during construction?
Oct
16
comment What does this (electrical) value mean on my washing machine's back?
Keep in mind that this rating should take into account the 80% "working load limit" on electrical circuits; an appliance like a dryer rated for a dedicated 220VAC10A circuit should actually draw less than 1760W while running, though the breaker won't trip until current exceeds 2200W.
Oct
16
answered What causes wet/damp concrete blocks in a newly built shed?
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Sep
10
accepted Oil or latex for Grade 5 metal parts, in use case not requiring hard wear
Sep
10
answered How do I mount this box without drilling or damaging the shelf?
Sep
10
comment Any reason not to ground the sheathing of MX wire?
Lastly, think; what would the cable be dissipating that heat into? It's rare, but failures energizing older BX can make the stuff glow red (without popping a fuse, as we've covered). The BX would be clamped to wooden structural members, not far from paper-backed insulation. Expecting older BX to do the job of newer AC/MC cable is asking for a house fire.
Sep
10
comment Any reason not to ground the sheathing of MX wire?
@wallyk: No, no, and no. First, fuses/breakers are "slow-blow" for a reason; you don't want a fast trip for a simple overload. It can take up to a second for a circuit breaker to break at its rating. Second, as I said, energizing grounded armor may not ever cause the breaker to trip, if there's enough resistance between the short and the bus strip that less than 15A is flowing. It's the same reason house plumbing is no longer an acceptable ground; it may well be grounded, but real ground can only absorb so much current.
Sep
10
revised Any reason not to ground the sheathing of MX wire?
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Sep
10
revised Any reason not to ground the sheathing of MX wire?
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Sep
9
comment Any reason not to ground the sheathing of MX wire?
Perhaps the biggest omission of info in the last revision is that I assumed, due to the age of the house, that the BX was non-bonded. The OP infers this is not the "type AC" cable you are familiar with today; it has nothing identifiable as a "ground wire" or "bonding strip". This type of cable dates back to the turn of the last century, and if original to the house, was installed almost 20 years before grounding of receptacles became a code requirement. As such there is no rating nor guarantee that the armor will withstand current and in fact it can be a fire hazard to try.