166 reputation
116
bio website volomike.com
location Myrtle Beach, SC
age 47
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Oct 29 '12 at 7:17
PHP freelancer

Jul
13
awarded  Famous Question
Oct
2
comment How do I properly jack up one side of my house?
Just got off the phone with a home improvement builder. He had never used self-leveler or roofing shingles, but said that was interesting. Instead, he used a system called scribing, which is far easier than cutting angled shims. Scribing is great for large sections of floor, although shimming might be good for final adjustments. Scribing involves cutting long thin strips of pine with a table saw at different heights, but never angled. You then lay these about a foot apart on top of nail glue and nail it down. Then, nailglue it again and tack OSB down on that.
Oct
2
comment How do I properly jack up one side of my house?
Yet another technique is fascinating -- they use cheap, low-quality asphalt roofing tiles in layers and then lay another OSB (or hardwood flooring) on top of that. askthebuilder.com/getting-a-new-hardwood-floor-level
Oct
2
comment How do I properly jack up one side of my house?
After asking around on the web, it appears that indeed you CAN use self-leveling compound on a plywood floor, but you must prep it first using latex floor primer that you roll on with a roller and then touch up near the walls with a brush. The plywood subfloor must be made leakproof, essentially. Basically -- you can't afford to let the self-leveling compound seep through the floor, creating massive stains on the ceiling below. More info is here: ehow.com/how_7624294_use-leveling-compound-plywood.html
Oct
2
comment Can Hi-rib cementing be used to level a second story floor?
What about self-leveling compound, which I assume is a kind of plastic resin and therefore much lighter? (I'm guessing on that, so please let me know as I'm considering something like Mapei Self Leveling Compound.)
Oct
2
comment How do I level an unlevel floor?
@MarkD Can this compound be used like an upstairs floor where I pull the carpet up, pull the baseboards up, expose the subfloor, and pour directly on the wood subfloor? Or, would I need to treat the subfloor with a brushed on polyurethane to seal most of the gaps first?
Sep
29
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
10
awarded  Popular Question
May
4
accepted Reducing Attic Fire Risk
Apr
20
answered Reducing Attic Fire Risk
Apr
15
comment Reducing Attic Fire Risk
@sharptooth. It's the strangest stuff. I tried to ignite it in a container in my garage. It was resistant to melting at first, but then melted rapidly after the flame got hot enough. It had only weak fumes, no smoke, and never caught fire. It was like it absorbed the fire and put it out.
Apr
15
awarded  Scholar
Apr
15
accepted How do I properly jack up one side of my house?
Apr
14
comment Reducing Attic Fire Risk
It was blown poly -- that's all the guy said to me. It's soft to the touch, like cotton, but plastic. Doesn't scratch your fingers like fiberglass. Smells like plastic but only if you hold it up to your nose. I'm thinking of taking some of it out in the backyard and setting it on fire, to see how fast it burns. If it burns super fast, I'm going to have to do something about this.
Apr
13
awarded  Teacher
Apr
13
awarded  Student
Apr
13
answered How do I properly jack up one side of my house?
Apr
13
asked Reducing Attic Fire Risk
Apr
13
answered dishwasher odor
Apr
13
awarded  Editor