Reputation
1,184
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
4 16 27
Impact
~182k people reached

2d
awarded  Famous Question
Jul
22
awarded  Yearling
Mar
11
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
18
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
13
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
16
comment What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
@Speedy I didn't say insulation does not matter, I said it doesn't change how much current a given wire can carry. The more current a wire carries, the higher the temperature will be, and thus you need to have an appropriate type of insulation. Different charts provide "safe" ampacities based on ambient temperature and insulation material. Yes, I have seen (and worked with) NEC information. What terms do you find erroneous or not standard?
Sep
16
comment Are extension cords safe for permanent use?
I would add to this list to never use an extension cord when still coiled up. The rating assumes the cord will cool in open air, but coiled-up cords cannot dissipate heat very well, which can lead to a fire.
Sep
16
comment What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
(I should have added that the voltage drop was at the ~5.7A load of the lamp. It would be more with a higher wattage load.)
Sep
16
comment What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
Similar/related questions of interest: What size extension cord should I use for multiple computers?, Extension cord and power strip safety, Are extension cords safe for permanent use?
Sep
16
comment What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
Also for a more general guide to selecting extension cords, Home Depot has a friendly chart without all the math. :) (Though it is a bit less conservative.) General Cable also has a PDF guide.
Sep
16
comment What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
The ampacities given by NEC are less conservative than the table I used. For 10 AWG copper wire with a 60°C rating, the value given is 30 A (compared to 15 A). There are many factors involved, but I would hesitate to use a 10 AWG extension cord for a 30 A load. Also, I calculated the voltage drop for a 100' length of 14 AWG extension cord (200' total) to be < 3V, which I wouldn't necessarily deem excessive.
Sep
16
comment What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
@Speedy A lot of ampacity charts show values like the one I linked. "Chassis wiring" is meant for wiring in air, while "power transmission" is for wiring in bundles (ref), as you would find in a typical extension cord. Insulation type doesn't change how much current a given wire can carry directly, but matters because a wire carrying high currents at high temperature can burn or melt insulation that isn't rated for it.
Sep
15
revised What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
Some clarifications
Sep
15
answered What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
Sep
15
revised What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
Spelling in title
Sep
15
suggested approved edit on What gauge wire/cord do I need for these outdoor lamps?
Sep
3
awarded  Famous Question
Aug
5
comment Why is high voltage coming out of HDMI port on my TV?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a home electrical problem that should be addressed by an electrician on site.