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seen Feb 22 at 12:26

Jul
24
comment Is this rotary hammer capable of driving a ground rod into hard soil?
I've broken 4+ sledge hammers driving ground rods and also one of those manual drivers with handles on the side, which, despite being made from 1/4" steel, can only take so many whacks from a sledge. (Not to mention the resulting mushroomed top that has to be cut and ground smooth.) The amount of force required to drive a ground rod in hard soil is truly maddening. It will be nice to not have to deal with that crap again.
Jul
24
comment Is this rotary hammer capable of driving a ground rod into hard soil?
Reading more carefully: "Then I put my 8' step ladder next to the ground rod and inserted the former chisel's shank into the 3" of rubber hose sticking out above the top of the ground rod, and pulled the trigger. Within a couple of minutes the ground rod was 7.5 feet into the ground." He is claiming that it drove the ground rod in 3 minutes. Very impressive for an SDS-Plus rotary hammer. I had my doubts, but I guess it can get the job done if he is to be believed.
Jul
24
comment Is this rotary hammer capable of driving a ground rod into hard soil?
The second link is indeed an SDS-Plus rotary hammer (and it is weaker than the one that I've linked)! I wonder what he means by "two minutes after starting," however. If the "start point" was the previous picture where he shows the radiator hose attached, then it looks like it's going nowhere? If not, then 2 minutes is very good for a weak hammer to almost fully drive a ground rod, which can take two men 30 minutes and a lot of sweat in hard soil.
Jul
24
comment Is this rotary hammer capable of driving a ground rod into hard soil?
The rotary hammer in that video is an SDS-Max model (10 joules of impact energy), not SDS Plus (2.9 in the case of the linked model.) There are roughly 10 such videos, but none of them feature an SDS Plus drill. :(
Jul
20
comment What is a GFI outlet used for, and where should I install them?
This answer gets an A. The only improvement that I think could be made would be to note that there are two types of GFCI: one for personnel (the one you commonly hear about; extremely sensitive) and one that is less sensitive... and that there is also something called an AFCI breaker, which opens the circuit if arcs caused by loose connections are detected.
Jul
19
comment How can I soundproof an interior door?
I guess it definitely makes sense that they have some sort of support behind the veneer, else they would be exceptionally flimsy. Well dang. I was hoping to remedy the issue with $10 and a little elbow grease. So much for that idea.
Jul
18
comment Why is ENT rarely used for electrical wiring?
@bcworkz By "a couple of exterior weatherproof boxes," I assumed that the conduit is going to be run along the outside of the building.
Jul
13
comment Can I caulk a hose connection for a pool vacuum pump?
What's the nature of the connection? If it is something that threads on, all you should need is PTFE tape. If it slips on, PVC primer and glue may work, but you should call the manufacturer.
Jul
11
comment How can I add a circuit breaker when there are no openings available in the neutral bus bar?
I was just watching one of my recordings of an electrical conference thing that I went to and, to my surprise, the guy started talking about doubletapping lugs on the busbar with ground wires. He said you can only do it with ground wires (not with neutrals) and only if they're the same size, so disregard the part where I said you can perhaps get away with mixing an AWG10 or AWG14 with an AWG12. You'll have to find another AWG12 wire.
Jul
10
comment How can I add a circuit breaker when there are no openings available in the neutral bus bar?
Regarding doubletapping the lugs, I would be more cautious about using different-sized wires in them. You can get away with putting an AWG10 in a wire nut with an AWG14, but I highly doubt you could get away with putting those same two wires under the busbar lugs. You should be able to easily find an AWG12 wire to pair it with, but if you can't, definitely nothing other than an AWG10 or AWG14. No matter what size wire you use, though, once again, you want to give all of the wires a tug to make sure that they are secured (being careful to not touch any live parts.)
Jul
10
comment How can I add a circuit breaker when there are no openings available in the neutral bus bar?
@Rolando Wire nuts can take different-sized wires at the same time, but you can't get too carried away because the smaller wires will tend to get lost in the crevices between the big wires. Always give each individual wire a strong tug to make sure it's well secured.
Jul
10
comment How can I add a circuit breaker when there are no openings available in the neutral bus bar?
As far as your plan goes, it's fine, but make sure you have wire nuts to fit the wires that are being pigtailed. Wire nuts will also have a description on their package explaining what and how many wires they can accommodate, so you should select appropriately sized wire nuts. Also, make sure that none of the GND/N wires goes flailing around as you work on the other wires, as they could make contact with live electrical parts. It would be safest if you cut off all electricity prior to servicing the panel. I am not responsible for anything that might go wrong!
Jul
10
comment How can I add a circuit breaker when there are no openings available in the neutral bus bar?
@Rolando 12/2 and 14/2 are common types of Romex electrical wire, but that is not what they are talking about. In this case, they are referring to what sorts of wires you can put under the lugs. The first number is the gauge (in AWG [lower numbers are bigger wires]) of the wire and the second is the number of them: one (1) wire of size AWG14 to AWG4 (#14-4); or two to three (2-3) wires of size AWG14 to AWG10 (#14-10) It sounds like your busbars are capable of handling more than one wire as most of your wires will be AWG12 and AWG14. (Use some wire of known size as a reference.)
Jul
10
comment When wiring outlets should I use pigtails or both sets of outlet screws?
@bcworkz Some types of failures will cause an outage for all downstream devices, others will not. It depends on the type of failure, but as Philip Ngai has pointed out, the screw terminal, backing plate, etc. is seeing more current, so it will increase the possibility of something going wrong. Stabbing the receptacles in the back is even worse, and it is very likely that you'll have a failure at some point down the road.
Jul
10
comment When wiring outlets should I use pigtails or both sets of outlet screws?
@Craig Pigtailing is definitely the recommended practice, but I don't think it's required by code.
Jul
9
comment Why would I run out of water for a few seconds and then get full pressure back
Is there a rush of air when the water is out?
Jul
6
comment What is wrong with this GFCI outlet?
Turn the breaker off, open it up, and take a picture of both sides and the back. Maybe there's something we can see. Also, are you using a multimeter or a non-contact voltage tester, like Steven mentioned? It could be a few different things.
Jun
29
comment How to keep two water tanks have maintain the same water level?
If it is pressurized for an hour a day or something, all you'd have to do is vent the top of the tank for a few minutes during that period to make sure that it fills up all the way, being careful to not overflow the tank. If they are already connected in series, then you can get rid of the pump and use the city's water pressure to rid the air from the siphon pipes. We would need more information to give a definitive answer, however.
Jun
29
comment How to keep two water tanks have maintain the same water level?
Also, please explain how the water gets up into the tanks in the first place. Is it pumped directly from a private well?
Jun
29
comment How to keep two water tanks have maintain the same water level?
Please explain what you mean by "good supply of water." From your description, it sounds like this is a gravity-fed system and not pressurized.