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2d
comment Do I need a breaker in main pannel for sub pannel?
(I ask because my house has basically that setup - but with a 100A main panel and a subpanel with 5 branch circuits. I think the only way to shut off power to the subpanel is to hit the main 100A breaker, so I assume it's connected this way.)
2d
comment Do I need a breaker in main pannel for sub pannel?
Does the subpanel need a dedicated breaker just for supplying it, or can it simply connected to the output of the main breaker in the 200amp panel? Seems like as long as the feeder wire to the subpanel is sized for 200amp service this would be OK as long as there's an acceptable way to join that to the main breaker's output.
Aug
15
comment Foam insulation in interior walls
What are you trying to do? There's no reason you couldn't have some air space in your walls. You want to avoid creating a layer that has vapor barriers on both sides (thus no way to dry) but that applies whether the layer contains only air or contains air-permeable insulation such as fiberglass or rock wool.
Aug
13
comment How to fix this bathroom light?
My house has the retaining spring type, and it took me forever to figure out you just pull down the whole fixture. Once you try it it's pretty easy to handle though.
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
A GFI/RCD is a good idea. I don't think it'll matter a whole lot because the situation it limits -- hot reaching ground through paths other than the circuit's neutral wire -- is unlikely to transpire in an environment like a field. (The field is a poor conductor of electricity.) But that could vary with weather conditions, and GFIs are a good safety precaution for outdoor uses of any kind.
Aug
13
comment Should I add a return or another supply to a large room with only one supply?
If it's really not insulated, air sealing and insulating the ceiling of the garage is probably the lowest-long-term-cost way to fix this problem. Heat from your un-conditioned garage is rising into that room. After insulation, it might still need more supply or other changes, but that's a great place to start.
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
By the way, the reason we have a separate ground wire (usually green or bare), rather than simply wiring all our metal surfaces to the designated neutral wire, is because of human error. It would be easy to mix up hot & neutral in one e.g. light fixture and bond its exterior to hot, while bonding others to neutral, and have no visible sign of danger. By ensuring we bond everything to an obvious designated ground wire, a mixup of hot/neutral would short to the ground immediately.
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
So when you say: "If moisture gets into the light fixture, and the circuit is grounded, won't that blow the fuse quicker than un-grounded?" In your case, I don't think so. The light fixture has a neutral and a hot wire in it. Adding a ground as you've laid it out simply offers you another way to connect to neutral.
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
I think you are confused about how grounding works and what it buys you. The ground is the "reference zero" voltage in an electrical circuit. In an AC circuit and US terminology, this means taking one of the two legs and calling it "neutral" (the other is "hot"). A dangerous situation arises when things people might touch are at different voltage -- then a person might complete the circuit and get shocked. So to ensure they're all at the same voltage, we connect EVERYTHING to neutral. That's what a ground wire does - connects everything, and is bonded (wired) to neutral at one specific point.
Aug
13
comment How to repair buckled duct work inside wall?
@WalterStabosz that's not necessarily bad or unusual. If you also have a return downstairs, try closing it. This will force the system to pull more return air from upstairs where it is hotter. You can also try closing some of the supply vents downstairs. Note that this all presumes you can do this without causing undue strain on the system, i.e. closing some of these off will not cause your fan to overwork itself.
Aug
11
comment How to repair buckled duct work inside wall?
If your problem is that the upstairs isn't as cool as the downstairs, you might need a return air path from upstairs; many older houses that were built without central air only have return air intakes on the lower floor. Considering that these ducts run through a wall cavity primarily in conditioned space, I don't think improving their seal will change things appreciably and probably isn't worth the effort unless you have the wall open already.
Aug
11
comment Can the A/C temperature through a vent be significantly lower than in the air handler?
Assuming it's summer and the environment (i.e. your house, attic/crawlspace, etc) the ducts run through isn't colder, it's not plausible for air cooled by your evaporator coil to get even cooler as it travels to a vent. Most likely there are anomalies in how this is being measured. At the air handler, are you measuring temp after the coil? Are the air handler- and vent-site measurements being taken actually simultaneously, i.e. is it possible the system is changing states in between measurements, such as by turning on/off or changing load in the home?
Aug
11
comment What is the best way to fill a hole in a concrete basement floor?
I did this. It has been fine for about 3 years now. Thanks!
Aug
11
comment What is the best way to fill a hole in a concrete basement floor?
@Russell what looks corroded? There's corrosion on the pipe around the saddle, does that mean the contact between wire and pipe is poor?
Aug
11
comment How to properly seal/cover an unused chimney?
Update: we simply ignored this unused chimney for about a year. Then we decided to remove it completely. I hired roofers to remove the portion above the roof line and patch the roof. Then I removed it in the attic, two floor of living area, and basement. Lots of heavy lifting, but it enabled an improved layout of our kitchen/dining room!
Aug
11
comment Roof Decking: Plywood/OSB over skip sheathing (decking) or should I strip to the rafters?
I'm not an expert on this at all, but this article may be useful: askaroofer.com/skip-sheathing-roofing-in-roseville-95678. It suggests you should be fine to add OSB over the skip deck.
Aug
7
comment Do I need soffit vents and can I add them without taking the roof apart?
Is your "true attic area" actually connected to the soffits? I'm not sure if that's what you mean by "connected by about a foot depth of air space up the roof". Is that your rafter cavity? If so, then you could add soffit ventilation. As for whether you need it, your new metal roof may benefit from it if you get cold weather. Depends on how well your living space is insulated. If you have a cold winter and your space leaks warm moist air to the underside of a poorly-vented metal roof, moisture will condense on the cold metal - bad. If your insulation is really good that's not a concern.
Nov
30
comment Can I restore a bathroom sink with automotive filler and spray on enamel?
There are sink/tub resurfacing products (usually epoxies) that are designed for this and will probably perform significantly better than enamel.
Nov
30
comment Can a water heater be installed overhead?
I'm not sure about the code constraints, but a few things to keep in mind: you'll need access to the tank for maintenance, and the P&T relief valve needs a discharge pipe that terminates within a foot of the floor.
Nov
30
comment Why did our kitchen faucet stop working?
Are you sure there isn't some other valve upstream of your sink that is closed? It's very odd for the faucet to suddenly completely stop flowing or at least leaking unless it has been worked on recently.