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6h
revised Do I need a breaker in main pannel for sub pannel?
deleted 1 character in body
6h
comment Do I need a breaker in main pannel for sub pannel?
(I ask because my house has basically that setup - but with a 100A main panel and a subpanel with 5 branch circuits. I think the only way to shut off power to the subpanel is to hit the main 100A breaker, so I assume it's connected this way.)
7h
comment Do I need a breaker in main pannel for sub pannel?
Does the subpanel need a dedicated breaker just for supplying it, or can it simply connected to the output of the main breaker in the 200amp panel? Seems like as long as the feeder wire to the subpanel is sized for 200amp service this would be OK as long as there's an acceptable way to join that to the main breaker's output.
7h
revised Do I need a breaker in main pannel for sub pannel?
corrected spelling/autocorrect
Aug
15
comment Foam insulation in interior walls
What are you trying to do? There's no reason you couldn't have some air space in your walls. You want to avoid creating a layer that has vapor barriers on both sides (thus no way to dry) but that applies whether the layer contains only air or contains air-permeable insulation such as fiberglass or rock wool.
Aug
15
answered Hot water issues in the apartment and plumbers are stumped?
Aug
15
answered Do I need teflon tape (or something else) for a plastic shower head?
Aug
13
comment How to fix this bathroom light?
My house has the retaining spring type, and it took me forever to figure out you just pull down the whole fixture. Once you try it it's pretty easy to handle though.
Aug
13
answered Water Damage on Ceiling of Shower
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
A GFI/RCD is a good idea. I don't think it'll matter a whole lot because the situation it limits -- hot reaching ground through paths other than the circuit's neutral wire -- is unlikely to transpire in an environment like a field. (The field is a poor conductor of electricity.) But that could vary with weather conditions, and GFIs are a good safety precaution for outdoor uses of any kind.
Aug
13
comment Should I add a return or another supply to a large room with only one supply?
If it's really not insulated, air sealing and insulating the ceiling of the garage is probably the lowest-long-term-cost way to fix this problem. Heat from your un-conditioned garage is rising into that room. After insulation, it might still need more supply or other changes, but that's a great place to start.
Aug
13
answered Lever for faucet
Aug
13
answered This hole in a concrete porch needs fixing
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
By the way, the reason we have a separate ground wire (usually green or bare), rather than simply wiring all our metal surfaces to the designated neutral wire, is because of human error. It would be easy to mix up hot & neutral in one e.g. light fixture and bond its exterior to hot, while bonding others to neutral, and have no visible sign of danger. By ensuring we bond everything to an obvious designated ground wire, a mixup of hot/neutral would short to the ground immediately.
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
So when you say: "If moisture gets into the light fixture, and the circuit is grounded, won't that blow the fuse quicker than un-grounded?" In your case, I don't think so. The light fixture has a neutral and a hot wire in it. Adding a ground as you've laid it out simply offers you another way to connect to neutral.
Aug
13
comment Outdoor lighting: use 12V transformer or 220 V mains? And use RCD or not?
I think you are confused about how grounding works and what it buys you. The ground is the "reference zero" voltage in an electrical circuit. In an AC circuit and US terminology, this means taking one of the two legs and calling it "neutral" (the other is "hot"). A dangerous situation arises when things people might touch are at different voltage -- then a person might complete the circuit and get shocked. So to ensure they're all at the same voltage, we connect EVERYTHING to neutral. That's what a ground wire does - connects everything, and is bonded (wired) to neutral at one specific point.
Aug
13
answered Should I add a return or another supply to a large room with only one supply?
Aug
13
comment How to repair buckled duct work inside wall?
@WalterStabosz that's not necessarily bad or unusual. If you also have a return downstairs, try closing it. This will force the system to pull more return air from upstairs where it is hotter. You can also try closing some of the supply vents downstairs. Note that this all presumes you can do this without causing undue strain on the system, i.e. closing some of these off will not cause your fan to overwork itself.
Aug
11
answered How to protect soil up against new wood fence base
Aug
11
comment How to repair buckled duct work inside wall?
If your problem is that the upstairs isn't as cool as the downstairs, you might need a return air path from upstairs; many older houses that were built without central air only have return air intakes on the lower floor. Considering that these ducts run through a wall cavity primarily in conditioned space, I don't think improving their seal will change things appreciably and probably isn't worth the effort unless you have the wall open already.