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Nov
7
comment Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
@benrudgers while I absolutely won't claim that my answer is definitive by any stretch of the definition, it's not based solely on one company's business decision. Many units' manufacturer's installation instructions state that they should not be installed on second floors. And while it's true it's not uncommon for houses to be built above and beyond code it, alas, is also not uncommon for houses to be built to meet only the absolute minimum of code.
Nov
7
comment Best household energy storage
If the issue is literally gas within the walls of the house, that's easily remedied--as the propane tank and generator should be outside anyways.
Nov
7
revised Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
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Nov
7
comment Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
@benrudgers I agree, I'm definitely using a tongue-and-cheek explanation of 'live load' when it comes to the Front Loader. I'll clarify that. That said, the essence of the answer is simply that the second floor of a house is typically built to a different standard than the lower portion and that lower standard doesn't handle the vibrations of a HE Front Loader nearly as well. I'd argue even the first floor in many houses is under-built for the vibrations that a front loader introduces (at least that's true for our house!)
Nov
7
revised Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
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Nov
7
revised Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
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Nov
7
comment Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
Leaking is an issue with any water appliance. So this isn't likely the reason they'd let one kind on the first floor, but a different kind on the second floor.
Nov
7
comment Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
Is there a history of front-loader doors blowing off? Keep in mind that a front loader's water table is below the door most of the time. And that in spin cycle, very little water would be able to exit the front due to centripetal force. One of the main benefits of the front loader is how little water is uses vs. the top loaders.
Nov
7
answered Why would it matter whether a front-loading washer is upstairs?
Nov
5
comment Best household energy storage
It's literally conserved energy.
Nov
5
comment Tongue groove wood flooring - oops, I cut them both off
Is this engineered 'snap together' flooring, or actual nail/glue-down tongue and groove? In both cases, I don't think there's a huge risk here, but less so with the latter (as you can use extra glue/nails on the tongueless end.)
Nov
5
comment Best household energy storage
Indeed, your meaning was clear. Point of clarification was really for the OP's sake as it's not clear if they're looking for literal storage or not.
Nov
5
answered Best household energy storage
Nov
5
comment Best household energy storage
Point of clarification, it's not stored as money. It's converted to money.
Nov
5
comment Hardware (clamp and/or spacers) to mount a horizontal pipe to a roof?
Maybe I need a picture. :) But in my head, having too many fittings means you're adding a whole lot of 'wiggle points' that are lessening the rigidity of the overall structure. But I heed your 'overcomplicating things' words. I do tend to do that. I will ponder this some more!
Nov
5
revised Hardware (clamp and/or spacers) to mount a horizontal pipe to a roof?
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Nov
5
comment Hardware (clamp and/or spacers) to mount a horizontal pipe to a roof?
The catch is finding the right angle fittings to integrate the awning roof fittings into an anchor system fitting. That was the original thought behind avoiding that and just using pipe clamps to clamp the top pipe horizontally.
Nov
5
comment Hardware (clamp and/or spacers) to mount a horizontal pipe to a roof?
I suppose, though...now that I think about it a bit more, I could use the pipe flange, then 6" pipe, then a flange on top, and then screw wood to the flange so that I could then screw a clamp to the wood to hold the bard. A little bit of a work-around but could work...
Nov
5
comment Hardware (clamp and/or spacers) to mount a horizontal pipe to a roof?
Thanks for the answer. The awning frame will be rectangular with fittings. I then need to take the horizontal bar and somehow clamp it to something that is then attached to the roof. I think these ideas would work if I was attaching perpendicular poles, but not clamping it horizontally.
Nov
4
comment Hardware (clamp and/or spacers) to mount a horizontal pipe to a roof?
@Tester101 I did find those online, but those brackets appear to be proprietary to the awning system and those brackets cost more than what I'm spending on this entire thing. :)