13,615 reputation
22253
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 7 hours ago

11h
comment Is there any way to predict foundation problems?
One thing to note if you are in the upper midwest is Radon...might want to get a radon test as well.
11h
comment Is there any way to predict foundation problems?
The best way to predict if a 100+ year old house has foundation issues is to assume that a 100+ year old house will have some sort of foundation issues. It's less about if it has issues, and more about if they are serious (structural) or minor (bit of moisture) issues.
11h
answered Why is my kitchen so humid?
11h
comment Do I really have to cut my wood flooring to a 1 inch width?
Might be a huge workaround, but one thought would be to rip off the tongue, then finish-nail this last strip to the subfloor. For this to work well, you want to make sure your floor isn't too large, and mostly dimensionally stable to avoid seasonal expansion (engineered bamboo tends to be really dimensionally stable, though)
11h
comment Do I really have to cut my wood flooring to a 1 inch width?
The benefit is that a) you're less likely to run into the scenario you did and b) aesthetics...as now there's an equal size strip on each side. Admittedly, the latter is more noticeable the wider the boards you are using are. As for waste, half the time there won't be any more than you have now (you still have the same number of rows) but the other half of the time--when the gap on each side is less than half the width of a board--you will actually have less waste (as you can use one half the board on one side of the room, and the other on the other end at the finish.)
1d
comment Do I really have to cut my wood flooring to a 1 inch width?
The "workaround" is to be sure to measure the room before you start next time...and then cut off an even amount from the first and last rows. Alas, kind of hard to do after the fact. :/
1d
comment Is there a more rugged finish than Polyurethane for a heavy use table?
So, quick follow up question: One of the traits of this table is a few deep grains, old nail holes, and other imperfections (it appears to have been built with reclaimed wood). Since I can't easily sand out the water=based poly in these small areas, is that a concern if I apply an oil-based product on top of it? (Am I maybe stuck with water based from here on out with this table?)
1d
comment How can I fix this gap in my kitchen counter?
also, I just realized this is a base cabinet. It appears that your floor (or wall) isn't perpendicular to the other. It could be that your floor is simply settling/tilting down causing the front of the cabinets to be lower than the back. If that's the case, shimming the front of the cabinents might be the solution.
1d
comment How can I fix this gap in my kitchen counter?
Instead of tightening an existing screw, it might be easier just to drill a new one in nearby.
1d
comment Is there a more rugged finish than Polyurethane for a heavy use table?
Thanks, Shirlock. Indeed, this was a water-based product. I'll look into giving this a go with an oil-based urethane!
1d
accepted Is there a more rugged finish than Polyurethane for a heavy use table?
2d
revised Is there a more rugged finish than Polyurethane for a heavy use table?
added 113 characters in body
2d
asked Is there a more rugged finish than Polyurethane for a heavy use table?
2d
comment What are the differences between these types of small-dimension lumber?
Furring strips are typically made from wood that is going to be hidden. In other words, it's neither structural nor designed to take a finish well.
Apr
15
answered How to keep pine needles out of a gutter?
Apr
14
comment What can be done about water running under my house?
I'm certainly no expert, but some quick googling of 'perched water table' shows that it is often a sign of a spring. Hopefully your house wasn't built on a spring! (Good luck!)
Apr
10
comment How would I replace this wall?
external walls are typically load bearing (They bear the the floor and roof above). So you'll likely need to install a beam at the very least to help carry the load to support columns. If the floor joists above run parallel, however, it's likely carrying much less of a load (vs. if the were running perpendicular)
Apr
10
comment When wiring outlets should I use pigtails or both sets of outlet screws?
@amphibient oh, to clarify, I got why there were two sets--I just wasn't used to seeing the outlet, itself, being used to connect them. In past homes, that was always done via pigtailing.
Apr
10
comment Using 1" black iron pipe as a hydronic radiator, how many feet of pipe would I need to heat a 500ft^3 room?
oh! Hmm...I'd say that's maybe over complicating things, but I've been known to overcomplicate things too. :) As for PEX, I don't think it'd have the same thermal transference as copper (even with PEX piping, the baseboards are still copper, I believe). With the pinhole design, the one concern would be if that would cause a major bottle neck in your flow causing issues with that overall circuit...but maybe remedied by just making sure the total area of the 4 holes equals the diameter of the intake/outake pipes (NOTE that I'm neither a plumber or mathematician, though!)
Apr
10
comment Using 1" black iron pipe as a hydronic radiator, how many feet of pipe would I need to heat a 500ft^3 room?
Possibly, but if it's baseboard heat already, most of the heat transference is via fins. For example, the metal covering to the baseboard heaters is usually pretty hot. So, one option would be to do essentially what you have, but add fins to the copper (instead of oil). You may need to make it a proper loop, though (So instead of an 'E' shape you may have to use an 'S' shape)