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11

My suggestion is that you consider installing a ready made plug strip across the back of the work bench. These can be purchased from many suppliers and come with an already attached heavy duty power cord that you can attach to the home outlet. Here is an example of what I am suggesting: Let me also make another suggestion (coming from an experienced ...


9

Yep. You can use shop vacs for this (albeit you might need some adapter hoses). A neat thing to get is a power switch that can switch on another appliance one the first is turned on. The idea is you plug your saw and your shopvac into it, and when you power on the saw, the shopvac powers on at the same time: ...


9

reasons going to the service entrance will be difficult: you'll have to open the meter box, and most meter boxes are tamper sealed by the electric company so you will have to involve them. the meter box lugs are probably not sized for multiple connections. this creates a potentially dangerous wiring setup. someone may assume that the main panel in the ...


9

My grandfather was a carpenter and when he retired he moved most of his tools into his basement. This included a drill press, bandsaw, and a very heavy full size table saw. It is definitely doable. Drill presses and bandsaws don't generally create as much dust as sanders and routers. You can probably remove most of the dust they'd create with a well placed ...


9

I like power strips similar to this for work areas. They are nice because they have an on/off switch, which if mounted in an easy to reach location could save life and limb. Using a power strip like this should not be a problem, as long as you don't run too many tools at once. And it should conform to most codes, as it would be classified as an extension ...


9

If it's a hand tool not designed to be mounted in that manner, I would advise against doing this as it has the potential to be dangerous. Think about what would happen if the tool were to become dislodged or the blade break off. In the event of an emergency, how would you quickly shut it off? Saws like table saws and band saws should have an easily ...


8

Echoing Steven's answer, I wouldn't do kitchen cabinets either. I would get/build a real workbench that can hold 100's of lbs on the surface. If you aren't up to building your own, you can buy some nice-looking kits from Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or Sam's Club. Maybe start with a ready-made workbench as the core of your workshop, and build the remaining ...


8

Pegboard attached to workbench will likely vibrate like crazy while you're trying to file, sand, saw, route, or hammer anything. It's safer to just put the pegboard on the wall.


8

This is not an answer related to code but simply doing the layman's math. First off the Freezer should be on a dedicated circuit. Not because of any excessive amperage draw, but because if you fire up the table saw and the dust collector at the same time and it pops the breaker, you don't want the freezer being shut off for potentially an undetermined ...


7

It's all about Volt Amperes. NEC 2008 gives us an easy way to do things in residential. 220.82 Dwelling Unit. (A) Feeder and Service Load. This section applies to a dwelling unit having the total connected load served by a single 120/240-volt or 208Y/120-volt set of 3-wire service or feeder conductors with an ampacity of 100 or greater. It ...


7

I have my entire woodworking workshop in my basement. Plenty of people have basement workshops. Just get a portable dust collector like this one: Get good filter bags that filter down to at least 5 microns, smaller is better. And a remote controlled air filtration system like this one to hang from the ceiling. Drill presses make very little dust. ...


6

Could you do it... Yes. There are a few problems with this setup. First, if the saw does not have a locking trigger how will you turn it on when you are cutting? If it does have a locking trigger, you'll want a way to turn the tool on/off quickly and easily. This could be achieved by connecting the saw to a power strip, and mounting the strip in an easily ...


5

I have a similar workbench but instead of finishing it, I screwed down (no glue) two layers of hardboard. It's cheap so I don't mind dinging it up and since it's only screwed down, it'll be easy to replace when it gets too dinged up.


4

Your question is a little broad, but I will interpret it to be something like "Can I use LED lighting sources to illuminate my workbench and desk?" Yes. While the purchase price of LEDs is still much higher than conventional bulbs or CFLs, the prices are dropping and you often can find sales. There are 75 watt led flood bulbs now available in the $20 range, ...


4

The epoxy glaze you cited is what us old timers used to call casting resin. We use it on bar tops to give good gloss and a hard finish. Sounds like a good choice to me, but several coats of good oil based urethane will also give you good results. Good Luck


4

The best set-up for maneuverability plus stability to to allow the workbench to sit on fixed legs. When you want to move the bench you can implement a jacking system with the casters similar to I have seen this implemented with a rope where you can pull the casters down underneath to lift the bench or with a foot operated jack similar to some table saws ...


3

I like installing it on the wall. Actually, one of the coolest workbenches I've seen recently had two layers of pegboard -- the outer layer swung open on hinges like a cabinet door to reveal the inner layer.


3

Yes it will be unhealthy... if you dont have any ventilation 1- MLA / MLZ external grille 2- Filters (hepa/etc)(not required in your situation) 3- a reliable higher quilaity not el-cheapo air fan 4- sensors (not needed here) 5- heater/cooler (not needed here) 6- Grilles 9 - AVM Backflow preventer (important) 10 - AS shutter 7,8 - Switches (not ...


3

The short answer is "yes"; you are limited by amperage on the circuit, not by the number of outlets that may happen to be on that circuit. A long power strip like the one listed above is a great solution.


2

Here are a few free ones I found through a Google search. Build a Single Garage Shell. Plan for a 16' X 22' Garage. 20' X 24' Garage. There seems to be a lot of sites that will supply you with plans for a fee. You may also be able to find blueprints of garages built in your city at the city clerks office, at least for garages built with permits (I think ...


2

In order of increasing cost: This website has a few good plans for simple garages available at no cost. TodaysPlans looks like it has some good plans for free, but you have to get them through email. Mybackyardplans has a few for free, but they look to be low quality. This website has them starting around $70. JustGaragePlans has a wide range to pick ...


2

I don't know if cabinets are the best idea as a base for your bench. There are not designed to hold a lot of weight from the top and be forced upon. As well, often you will be banging on your bench and rattling it around - imagine what will happen to what's in the cabinets. It's best to isolate them from your bench. Here is a relatively simple but very ...


2

I've used spar urethane for this purpose. Be aware, though, that it will outgas for a long time if you don't expose it to the sun.


2

If your looking for easy monuverability, than this can be easier. Ive seen a german company make a very inexpensive mounting precision table. The shipping is more expensive because its international. Nonetheless its the best and safest way to secure your jig saw because the top arm secures the saw blade. However this is literally for precision work. You ...


2

Using a jigsaw in a table setup is no more dangerous than using it handheld if the mounting is secure - the blade is not guarded when a jigsaw is used handheld either! If you really wanted a guard you could build one into a table mounted jigsaw. Several manufacturers even make table insert plates for their jigsaws similar to router mounting plates. I ...


1

The links below provide the guidelines for industrial facilities but may be of interest. They discuss the importance of considering potential ignition sources and use of effective dust collection systems. OSHA Combustable Dust Hazard Information NFPA 664: STANDARD FOR THE PREVENTION OF FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS IN WOOD PROCESSING AND WOODWORKING FACILITIES As ...


1

I, too, would be leery of making too nice a table to work on. I recommend a layer of Masonite for a top. It is cheap, takes paint well, and easy to replace when you spill glue or paint on it. Truth be told this is my plan, but I haven't quite gotten there. My workbench is covered by cardboard. Too busy working to make a workspace.


1

I suppose it depends on where and how you plan to use this workbench. If there's a wall available, and if you might use the bench for large projects, then attach the pegboard to the wall. Having the pegboard attached to the bench limits the size of projects that you can put on the bench and the directions from which you can approach the bench. On the other ...


1

I'd seriously reconsider heating the section of the garage where the vehicles are stored. Storing vehicles in a heated garage in the winter rapidly accelerates rust formation. http://www.cars.com/go/advice/Story.jsp?section=top&story=car-talk-tips&subject=more&aff=cartalk



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