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Ok, so you need easy finishing options: Let's start with wax since you mentioned that. Paste wax is probably the easiest option, although many waxes and wax/oil blends will work. You could also try beeswax, butcher's block wax, or even paraffin. For any wax that's too firm, try mixing with mineral spirits or mineral oil and applying some elbow grease. Wax ...


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It is not much more work nor much more expensive to purchase a new door w/door knob hole and the hinge reliefs routed. If your measurements are accurate and precise, and the fabrication of the new door is true to the demensions of the existing door, maybe $45 for the cheapest hollow door to $175 for a solid wood one, and all hinges are prwciarly set so that ...


2

It looks like it will press right back into place, so it really comes down to what type of glue to use, and how to clamp. Here's what I would do: Choose a glue: Any normal PVA ("wood glue") should be fine. Superglue might be quicker, but it can be fussy, so practice with it on another piece of wood if you go that route, so you know what to expect. ...


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For general hardness and strength, I would choose a hardwood. To resist cracking, I would choose a diffuse porous wood, and avoid grain runout (wood fibers should be approximately parallel to the sides) Maple would be ideal. Cherry or birch would be good too. Ring porous woods like oak, ash, or hickory are more prone to crack. These woods are deliberately ...


4

"White wood" is a generic term for whatever fast-growing wood is cheapest at that time and in that place. It may be pine, fir, or occasionally even poplar (which is as fast-growing and soft as most "softwoods" despute being considered a hardwood). It will be a solid wood, though there may be cases where boards have been spliced to get useful sizes.


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From the picture you can tell that it is solid wood because you can see the annual rings, and they are continuous over the whole width of the stud, so nothing is glued together.


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Tried staining and sanding on a sample piece. It didn't come out as expected. There was very little difference between the engraved and the un-engraved portions. So , I decided to redo this with a plaque made of basswood instead of pine. This worked perfectly. The laser burnt the wood just right to provide a distinct contrast with the un-engraved regions.


3

The building code does address the width, profile, and the rounding of the treads. From the 2009 IBC: R311.5.3.3 Profile. The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be no greater than 9/16 inch (14 mm). I believe the reason for rounding the leading edge of the tread with wood is to reduce the likelihood of splintering. Also, ...


4

The key to a mortise and tennon joint is the glue surface. Often, in a manufacturing environment, when the joint is assembled, they will shoot a nail into to hold the joint until the glue dries instead of putting it into a clamp and waiting for it to dry. This speeds up production and takes up less space. There is nothing wrong with that method, but it ...


3

Use a sanding block (ie, do not hand sand with your fingers) which will prevent the sandpaper from pressing into the grooves. 1 mm is huge, for anything reasonably described as fine sandpaper and not applied with excess enthusiasm. But, as is always the case, testing your complete proposed finishing process on a suitable piece of (in this case) ...


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What about filling the engraved area with a darker material, either colored wood filler or dark epoxy, scraping level before it hardens, and after it sets, just a very light sanding to remove any residual on the rest of the surface?


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Assuming 70°F, 7 days to cure. You stated your temp has been 40°-60° and did not state humidity. There is nothing wrong with the product, you have used it outside of parameters recommended by the manufacturer (see text below). Take it into a temperature and humidity controlled space and hopefully it will cure hard. Dry times are based on 70°F and 50% ...


2

The wood will swell slightly with higher humidity but if you don't have it in a frame and are mounting it like a sliding barn door then I wouldn't worry about expansion. The problem with expansion is mostly for doors and windows in frames that causes them to jam. Also, like the picture you posted, if the wood is cross-cut it will be less likely to expand ...



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