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If you really can't get time on a tablesaw, a handheld circular saw with a normal 7-1/4" blade would do most of the cutting you need. (And the shoe tilts to get you your angle.) That said -- thanks Tester101 for reminding me -- this isn't the simplest cut to make. You need to be good at both following a line and keeping the circular saw blade straight in the ...


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A Minimum 10" circular saw or table saw are the best options either would be $500 w/ the table saw being the best option. A band saw could also work.


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You can use a router or a dado blade in your table saw, or a surface plane to trim the bottom of the posts.


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As indicated in the accepted answer the bevel on each side of the 2x4 would need to be 15˚. Assuming the 2x4s are standard dimensions of 1.5" x 3.5" your twelve 2x4s will make a construction that is just over 13" across. You may want to evaluate if that is the size you want. If you desired a construction that was a bit bigger you could use 24 2x4s with ...


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Poly will get damaged from the hot pans set on it. A type of oil rubbed in may be better. A light coat of tung oil may do the trick.


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Do not go with a wood base! You will regret it. A wood base will hold germs and bacteria, and will rot away after so many washes and bird droppings. Always try go with a solid concrete base for birds if possible, or a good solid slab base. You must also be careful of critters digging under and getting through. Ideally you want concrete base, nothing else. ...


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15˚ (360 / 12 / 2) on each side of each 2x4.


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Trus-Joist Corporation has an informative .pdf that addresses some of these problems. It's here: www.woodbywy.com/document/tb-821/ (I found this link by Googling the phrase 'I-joists as wall studs'.) One of the main problems I noticed in the document is securely attaching the studs to the floor. What they describe is to add stiffeners to the OSB web at the ...


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You don't mention what type of wood it is but it's an important piece of info to know. Some woods and their plywood counter parts are more difficult to stain without additional prep. Birch is an example that usually requires a conditioner prior to staining. A lot of oils will give wood a nice light finish. Mineral oil is really cheap and easy to apply. ...


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Blum (brand) Tandem (model) is one of a few under mount drawer glides that would work. If the person responsible for the install has done these before, it's very straightforward.


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Depending upon your 'bravery' you could keep an eye open on your travels for a working carpenter and ask him to rip it down for you (in exchange for the price of a drink), otherwise I agree that for a short length you'd manage with a saw and a plane/or some sandpaper on a block. The secret is holding it very firmly. Sawing along the grain is more laborious ...


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I really like @RedGrittyBrick's suggestion -- a simple way to get through the project without needed more elaborate tools. Another method that I've resorted to in a pinch, that DOES work, would be to use the existing piece as a guide and make a patient series of longways scores with a utility knife. Because of going with the grain, you can actually get well ...


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Rip it using a table saw. Set the width from the fence to the blade using your current piece. This will get you the width you need. When you rip it, be careful to only move the piece forward into the cut. You'll have a tendency to move it sideways slightly due to the length. If you have someone to support it coming out the other side, this would work best, ...


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For short lengths, (a few metres) I'd make a line with a pencil, clamp the molding to the edge of a table, use a cheap rip-cut saw (<£10) to cut outside the line then use a hand plane(~£20 2nd hand) to flatten the cut edge to the line. If you don't fancy a proper plane, buy a cheap yellow plastic Stanley surform (the longer one). It'll be fine for edges ...


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The piece you have may have started life as the piece you just purchased and was ripped down to its current width. The best tool for this is a table saw. It would be very difficult to do it any other way. many home improvement stores will cut down wood to custom lengths and widths. They may be able to cut it down for you in the store if you do not have ...


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I would begin with a cardboard pattern. You could measure each distance, lay them out on the right edge of the cardboard. Or you could use profile gauge such as this one. I would then do a rough cut of the cardboard, lay it into the corner, and trim to precision. Do not cut the left edge until the end. Then transfer the profile onto the molding. On the ...


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One possibility would be to get a piece of quarter-round and glue or otherwise affix it to the edges of a flat-sided piece of wood matching the non-rounded dimensions that you need. The corners will need to be dealt with, and could be cut with a lot of work with a random orbital sander. Another option is to shape the quarter-round by hand as suggested ...


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I would expect that most retail outlets do not offer to run wood through a shaper or do router work. What you really want to look for is a crafts-person that has the tools to do this for you. If your intent is to avoid having to pay someone to do a project like this then take the opportunity to figure out how you can do it yourself. There are a number of ...



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