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If you're joining two pieces of wood along the length of the grain, the glue bond can be stronger than the wood itself. Butt joints are the exact opposite. If you need to join two grain ends, you'll want to reinforce it with biscuits or dowels (or possibly something even fancier like dovetails). Without knowing what you're attempting to make, my suggestion ...


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In addition to @Tester101's advice about clean joints, you also need tight joints. In general, most glues need to be squeezed to a very thin layer to obtain maximum strength. In many new chairs, there is cut in the end of the stretcher tenon. A very thin wooden wedge is coated with glue and is driven in that cut to expand the end of the tenon and lock it ...


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The last time you glued them, did you clean the joint and make sure all the old glue was gone? Wood glues (e.g. Elmer's) require a clean wood to wood joint, and don't bond well to old glue, stained wood, or finished wood. You might want to try a polyurethane glue (e.g. Gorilla Glue), as these will bond to a variety of surfaces. They also expand a bit, and ...


1

The right way: buy a bigger piece of wood. For very limited, low-stress uses, the biscuit joiner as mentioned by @Nathan might work well enough - as might a Tongue and groove joint, double-groove and spline joint, or lap joint. While a scarf joint (various types are available) is strong, with such short pieces of wood you probably don't have enough wood in ...


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Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


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Top, then bottom, then top, then bottom will greatly reduce the odds of the board warping due to differential moisture uptake/release when one surface is sealed and the other is open to the air. While the acrylic paint is sealing it somewhat, the conventional wisdom of long experience is to try and keep the number of coats per side the same to prevent (or at ...


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Doesn't make any difference, really; the question is number of coats per surface, not order they're applied in. The thing to watch out for is that there will be a tendency for drips to run down the edges and onto the other face. You may want to use masking tape or other techniques to guard against that, though going with multiple thin coats rather than ...


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It sounds like you have a very sensible and thorough approach to the project. Just a few suggestions: Saw Blade Most blades that come with table and miter saws are fairly low end. If you are cutting plywood for finish carpentry, you want a high tooth count blade for smooth cuts. Check out one of the blade manufacturers for the range and you will find some ...


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A willingness to try and a model to follow is all you need to succeed. The rest are details. Confidence comes from seeing how to succeed. Fear and uncertainty come from seeing what can go wrong. Since you know exactly what the finished product will be, you have at least 80% of the problem already solved. Your acceptance of perhaps having to do it twice ...


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Note that you can make something roughly similar to a track saw by throwing together your own saw guide. Cut about a foot off sheet of plywood so you can use the factory edge as a straight edge. Glue-and-screw that on top of another layer of plywood, with its straight edge set back from the lower layer's edge by a bit more than the distance from the edge of ...


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Realizing it is a bit late to help the OP, I am personally a fan of the track saw. One trick I have used to get a repeatable cut is to set a combination square to the desired width. It is very quick to lay the track on the wood, set the square in place, and slide the track to but up against the square. Do it at both ends, then double check for movement. ...



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