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5

Ten years ago I would have said getting any fussier than what you see average framing crews doing would be a waste of time. But in 2009(10?) I was involved in a project that had the framing done by a local Amish community. Hand planes, old timey plum bobs, brace and bits, the works. They didn't spend the time that we, the cabinet and trim guys, spend on our ...


2

There is okay sloppy, and there is bad sloppy. Bad sloppy has an impact on the finish of the house. For example, if you don't crown your joists correctly, your floor will be a bit wavy. If you don't choose good studs for your kitchen, it will be harder to hang cabinets and they won't look as good. Neither of these violate building code, but you can notice ...


5

Framing is structural, not cosmetic. So wood splinters and rough cuts are not an issue as long as they are carrying the load above and provide a good nailing surface at the correct locations. The part of the home you see, drywall (particularly the mudding), cabinets, flooring, etc, is where you make sure it looks good for appearance, but those looks don't ...


1

In the US and Canada, the standard reference for the industry is Architectural Woodwork Standards produced by the Architectural Woodwork Institute.


3

There are libraries of reference material out there so I'll just give you three that are suitable for beginner, intermediate, and advanced. When I say "advanced" I don't mean that you are an advanced woodworker, but that you have a desire to get a little deeper into the theory and underlying concepts than someone that's just trying to bang together some ...


1

It depends on how bad the wall is. If it's within, say a quarter of an inch of variance in 4', just scribe it in as Keshlam has suggested. If it's more than that...nothing you do to your trim work is going to really hide the problem. In this case, you may want to consider setting the wainscot with a string line, and then floating the walls out to meet it (or ...


4

If you really want the wainscoting to be straight, you could put shims behind the wainscot and baseboard to make them straight and level even if the wall isn't, and use a scribed board at the top to follow whatever curves exist there....


1

The puzzle was most likely done on a band saw using a miter gate. The cars/trucks looks like a it was done with wood trims, thin planks and dowels cut to size. The wheels done on a lathe. If you purchase the wheels from a craft shop, you can make the rest with a drill, some type of saw that you can cut nice straight lines with and lots of imagination. ...


3

My grandfather used to make toys similar to these for a charity called Toys for Tots. To the best of my knowledge he built everything with a couple cordless drills, a 14" bandsaw and a multi-function sander like this one, and copious amounts of hot glue. I personally would add to this a spindle sander and at least a skeleton set of quality hand ...


1

Since the joint has completely failed, the joint needs to be completely and carefully disassembled. This should be possible since the surfaces on each part is not aligned anymore, although it looks like a portion still may be glued tight. From what it looks like, it still should come apart. Just as mentioned in another answer, all remnants of glue needs to ...


0

There's probably dowels or a mortise/tennon joint which might make it difficult to take apart to clean and glue and it's a difficult shape to clamp. If this part of the leg won't be easily see as an alternative I would consider using a couple pocket hole screws in addition to glue to keep the pieces together. Then fill in the pocket holes with oak plugs, ...


2

I think your plan is doable with a little tweaking. Here's a list of some things to watch out for. Before assembly you'll need to thoroughly clean the old glue off the surfaces of the joint paying particular attention to the face grain areas (end grain offers little strength to a joint). You don't need to get down to bare wood but all of the crusty bits ...


3

I will to try to give a few numbers you may find useful based on what I have found over my years of connecting one thing together or the other. On Tapcons, Philcons or Con-certs or just good old concrete screws, 1" embedment into is the typical depth I see referred to. The screws are sold at those lengths with that in mind. 1 3/4" for 1X material. I checked ...


0

Which material is stronger while bearing weight? MDF will crack in half while plywood would still just deflect. Which would be the best choice for building a desk without sag? "Other". DMoore knows what's up; solid hardwood.


5

Any sheet goods are going to be lacking in strength in terms of deflection so your construction will have to compensate for this. You'll want to create rigidity using geometry of some kind like this torsion box or maybe by adding solid wood stretchers and aprons. As far as materials go, I'd be partial to MDO for a project like this but here's your options. ...


0

OSB takes forever to sand smooth enough for a desk. My vote is plywood, for that reason alone. You can plywood with one side smooth for not too much more money. Without a really good sander and patience, you won't be happy with the splintery OSB as a desk surface. Another option is laminated pine. I've built some cheap desks out of it with good ...


3

All wood sags. How much depends on the type of wood, the dimensions and the weight that will be put on it. Generally particle sags more than MDF, MDF sags more than OSB, OSB sags more than Plywood. The addition of an edge strip helps reduce sag considerably. Check out WoodBin's Sagulator which can estimate the amount of sag given your exact conditions using ...


0

Why tear down the barn? Either way, old sun-bleached barn wood can be impressive without any finish, especially if it's a hardwood like Oak. Powder post beetle holes can also add a distinct character to the wood. If there is active bug activity, they will soon die off. Most wood-eating pests require a source for water and if you dry the wood thoroughly they ...


3

Working with reclaimed wood presents a few unique challenges and concerns. It sounds like you're going to be using your stock in its raw form so I won't get into milling etc. The first thing to watch out for is dust. Barn wood is impregnated with all sorts of nasty stuff including molds and animal dander (a carrier of tetanus). Dust masks are an absolute ...


2

For specialty fasteners, such as Tapcons, consult the manufacturer's literature. It will contain full engineering data regarding applications, allowable loads, and installation requirements. For standard wood screws, the National Design Standard for Wood Construction contains the requirements. These are incorporated by reference into standard model codes. ...


2

Termites would be the most serious construction risk factor. There are businesses which specialize in the identification and treatment of termite infestation in most areas where termites are common. It would be prudent to consult with such a company if termites are a reasonable concern. Otherwise, suitability comes down to a question of species and quality ...


1

Your idea that the thickness of the mounted item should dictate the corresponding depth of screw penetration into the mounted to item is not a correct analysis. In actuality it is far more complicated than that if you wanted to actually analyze it to the finest detail. You have to consider the application of what you are trying to support. Will the screws ...



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