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I have used wet rags / towels and a heat gun if I take two long in making bent wood "butcher block" counter tops. With bad 2x4" I will use them in shorter pieces for fire blocks (ok now 2x6) or find other uses because if not dried straight they may twist again if only anchored at top and bottom in a wall. If you have a large number I did see 1 contractor ...


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If the 2x4 is not too twisted, then you can probably just use a clamp or a block. Start by fastening one end of the stud in place, and then use one nail to fasten the other end. The nail should be placed such that one of the edges of the stud is centered (as it should be). The other edge (lets call it edge B) will not be on center until a clamp or block is ...


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You might be interested in a door jamb saw...


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Perhaps I'm missing an obvious problem, but I'd simply pour off the dirty stain in the mixture into a waste container and then save the clean spirits that remain below.


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If there's enough headroom above the basement stairs, I would consider building a staircase over the existing basement stairs. Then you get to pick a height that works for all directions. You could also make the stairs without risers and increase the overlap on the treads, almost turning them in to a ladder. This is the way stairs on Navy ships are ...


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Assuming I'm reading your question right. Go to a local lumberyard and get a sheet of MDO (medium density overlay) plywood. Make sure it is sign grade, not concrete form. It's strong and it's weather resistant (rated as an exterior panel).


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Redwood, cedar, and teak are probably the most common rot-resistant species used for outdoor furniture. The first two are a pleasure to work with, but they're very soft. That means that they can be damaged more easily. Teak tends to be less common and/or more expensive. Pine (or spruce or fir) is inexpensive and can actually last quite some time if ...


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Consider using hand tools. If you read woodworking articles online, you would think you need a table saw, mitre saw, bench-top planer and a whole host of other power tools to do every simple task. While those things are nice to have, if you don't have them it doesn't mean you can't do anything. Since you only have 3 boards to cut, this can be done quite ...


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Here's your best bet: Build a landing outside the door basically where the current top level is, but shift it a bit to come out at a 45 from the corner to the right of the door (where the exposed stud is). This gives you more clearance when you're carrying groceries in through the door. Bring one conventional step down to the left, square with the wall. ...


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I did this, almost exactly as you have drawn (in my mothers home when I was a teenager). You will need to support the back end if you cannot support the bottom "lip" of the AC from sliding forward. In other words, the AC will have torquing-force. The reason I used a shelf for my AC was because I couldn't support the top. But since you are putting the AC ...



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