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1

A 4" forstner bit would require a drill press, so you would need to put the desktop on a drill press table to drill out the hole. Depending on where the hole is located (distance from edge of desktop), this could be very difficult with most drill presses (a radial drill press would be great for this, I love mine). If you try to use a 4" forstner bit in a ...


5

Use a router with a pattern bit. Create a circular template route out the interior. You can adjust the depth very accurately and bottom of the depression should be pretty smooth.


2

Your best bet would be to use a Forstner bit, if you can find one large enough. I've heard rumor of 4 inch bits, but wasn't able to find one online.


1

Hole saw, drill part way down (just to depth or just past, not all the way down). Then with a chisel, remove the wood inside the circle.


2

The proper way to do what you want is to First, get a plug cutter of the appropriate size for your fastener. http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32320&cat=1,180,42288&ap=1 Drill the hole(s) for the fasteners. Then, depending on the type of fastener you're using, either counterbore or countersink the fastener hole so the head of the ...


6

There are trim screws with very small heads. They come in stainless steel. The trim needs very little support so the small heads are not a structural problem. A woodworker's technique is to use a small sharp gouge (a curved chisel) to lift a small patch of surface from the wood, bend it back, drive a trim screw in the divot created by the gouge, and then ...


3

You can screw a thinner piece of plywood to the wall then glue the oak as a veneer over it. You can actually get very thin veneers of oak that are specifically for this purpose at specialty woodworking stores. Be sure to fill in the screwholes with putty before veneering as the screwholes will telegraph through the veneer over time.


1

Your best bet is to first strip the opening with some pine boards that you can screw in place to the studs with whatever fasteners that are feasible and can be countersunk. Make sure these boards are nice and flat and even. Then install the oak finish trim on top the pine using a contact cement. This way you will have no fasteners showing at all.


1

That's a hard thing to google. I can offer 2 possible approaches: 1.) I think you could do something like these doors with battens: http://www.appletree.me.uk/ledge&%20Brace1.GIF . You would have to turn the battens 90 degrees from the drawing since your facing boards are horizontal. The most important part would be the vertical battens on the left and ...


1

I know the theoretical answer to this because I read it here, in reference to a different router table top: http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=41793&cat=1,43053,43885 It's twofold, as suggested earlier in the comments: it helps the table to sit flat, or at least not concave, with the weight of the router. it ensures that the workpiece ...


1

Pocket screws are NEVER adequate for structural support. Something like this bed should be assembled with lags and carriage bolts, or better yet, Simpson brackets. Having said that, the most important joint in this piece is the connection between the bed rails and the posts so you could just use a combination of ship laps and bed bolts at those ...


1

When I built my similar workbench, I let the 2 x 4 around the outside stand 1/4" above the surface of the bench, and then cut a piece of masonite as a replaceable bench top. Masonite with a coat of clear varnish makes a nice surface and I have replaced it 2 or 3 times.


2

I'll try to take your questions one-by-one. You have two easy options for leveling the chalk line. The first would be to use a carpenter's level; you'd measure 34" from the floor at one end of the bench-to-be, then hold a long 2x4 to the studs with one end right at the mark. Lay your level on the top of the 2x4 and tip the 2x4's other (not at a mark) end ...


2

Nope. Don't use Water Seal. The main issue is that cedar is a pretty soft wood, and it wears. No matter what you put on it, the wood beneath will wear, and it will look like a leper with a sunburn. What you want to use is an oil. @Jeremy above suggested Australian Timber Oil, which is as good a solution as any. The idea is that oils will penetrate ...


4

If you plan to cut slots frequently, buy a dado blade.


4

Use a standard 1/8" blade, but make two passes that overlap by 1/16".


3

Use waterproof glue, make the joint tight-fitting, and leave the screws on the shelf. A lap joint is one of the strongest of all the glued wood joints, and a well-fitted glued lap joint will be at least as strong without the screws as with them. But... there's a condition. How wide are the two planks forming that joint? And which wood is being used? I ask ...


1

I would approach this a little differently. First I would make the box using a join that best fits the tools you have (Butt, dado, miter or dovetail). Once the box is together, sand so all the faces are smooth and the joint can't be felt. Now, get some veneer sheets (thin sheets of wood) and attach according to the instructions. Some will have adhesive ...


1

If you can make a precise miter, it does this fine. The trick is in making it precise enough, and gluing it without allowing it to slip. There is a family of standard joints, either originated by or made famous by the Stickley company (who were trying to get quarter-sawn faces on all 4 sides of an oak leg), that help with the slipping-when-gluing aspect by ...


7

The simplest way to do this is with a simple miter joint. Miter all sides of your panels at 45°. You'll need a tablesaw to do this, or a very accurate circular saw with a straight cutting jig (i.e. a track saw). To visualize it, each panel will end up looking like a squashed flat top pyramid if you lay it down on its outer face. It will be very difficult ...



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