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Redwood, cedar, and teak are probably the most common rot-resistant species used for outdoor furniture. The first two are a pleasure to work with, but they're very soft. That means that they can be damaged more easily. Teak tends to be less common and/or more expensive. Pine (or spruce or fir) is inexpensive and can actually last quite some time if ...


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Consider using hand tools. If you read woodworking articles online, you would think you need a table saw, mitre saw, bench-top planer and a whole host of other power tools to do every simple task. While those things are nice to have, if you don't have them it doesn't mean you can't do anything. Since you only have 3 boards to cut, this can be done quite ...


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Here's your best bet: Build a landing outside the door basically where the current top level is, but shift it a bit to come out at a 45 from the corner to the right of the door (where the exposed stud is). This gives you more clearance when you're carrying groceries in through the door. Bring one conventional step down to the left, square with the wall. ...


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I did this, almost exactly as you have drawn (in my mothers home when I was a teenager). You will need to support the back end if you cannot support the bottom "lip" of the AC from sliding forward. In other words, the AC will have torquing-force. The reason I used a shelf for my AC was because I couldn't support the top. But since you are putting the AC ...


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Obviously I'm a bit late to help you out, but you can build a jig for a circular saw to cut the same length. Probably overkill for 3 pieces but if you're cutting 10 or more, it's a good way to go. It sounds like a lot of work listed out like this, but really it's maybe 5 minutes of setup time. Start with a scrap piece of plywood. Since most circ-saws are ...


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The versatility of almost any tool is wholly a function of the user's skill set. The tasks you describe, however, are so widely varying as to present a single-tool problem. Rather than one do-all tool, set yourself up with a few quality tools. From your description I'd start with a circular saw (I like Makita) and a jigsaw (avoid gimmicks like laser ...


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best thing to do is install 3/8 threaded rods immediately below each rung. just drill a 3/8 hole through each stringer such that you can put a threaded rod directly under and touching the bottom of each rung (as close as possible). run the rod through each stringer and then put a large fender washer and nylock nut on the outside of each stringer. the ...


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The vast amount of stress on vertical (and steeply angled) members is compression, and splits are very common without significant degradation of structural integrity, especially in cedar. Having said that, the break does go pretty far along a notched area, so I would consider reinforcing the piece. I would probably skip the glue and drive a few stainless ...


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Generally speaking you are on the right train of thought - gluing in a filler panel. I would stay away from paint sticks, they are very thin and will not hold up to the forces working against a chair. You probably want to use material that is at least 1/4" thick. As for securing them, wood glue (PVA) will stick best to freshly sanded and clean wood; ...


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e-p-o-x-y. just mix and fill. once dry, sand and paint like wood.


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I would go and buy the clear wood putty, or colorless and use linseed oil to get the right color. I saw some tutorial with a gentlemen using three colors of oil to help lighten/darken the putty. You just mix it in your hands like playdoh.


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It's hard to say knowing nothing about your current setup, but it's common to keep your workpiece longer than needed during difficult cuts like that, and then trim the piece to length, eliminating the imperfect segment. Otherwise, the right set of push sticks should make the job safer and easier.


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A simple solution would be to drill out most of the slot and chisel out the rest on the sides. Then file and sand smooth. (I see this answer is embedded in another, longer answer, but it deserves to stand alone.)


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Here is the answer to my actual question: http://awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc Edit: Sorry if I'm not on the same wavelengths as anyone else. I already know about insurance and inspectors, and that was not at all what I was asking about. I just wanted to know what length of wood would span a certain distance given various ...


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I'd think you could drill a hole of the desired size in a piece of scrap, clamp it where the hole in the scrap is centered on the small hole you're trying to enlarge, then drill the new hole with the hole in the scrap acting as a guide to locate the bit/hole saw.


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If the wood is dented rather than cut/gouged, you can steam dents out with a clothes iron (preferably a steam iron, but not required if you keep the washcloth damp), a damp washcloth, and some patience. If it's actually cherry, and not just "whatever, with stain, called cherry since we used a reddish brown stain" it is best to remove and not replace the ...


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Edit: You are looking for a 2x6 aluminum tube. This should be pretty much have the same physical properties as a pine 2x6 (which looks like what you have in the lower picture). In the upper picture, it looks like two 2x2s that are sandwiched together. I would think that a single 2x4 tube would be fine to replace that, unless it needs that sandwich ...


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outside of any opinion i have on the idea, my two cents would be: vertical members out of solid 3/4" 6061-t6 drilled to take the transverse tubes or rods. less costly than going to a rectangular tube due to the loads you look like you are applying and thus the need for heavy wall and tig welding of the tranverse tubes to the uprights. if solid, you can ...



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