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thanks for the info I am at the stage of trying to figure how to get it flat on both sides. I have spalted maple and have 2-3" x 17" long 10-16" wide to make a table with a glass center. I am trying to figure where to begin and how in a decent woodshop. and suggestions wood be great ha. thanks for the suggestions but I don't understand what is wrong with 4 ...


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My suggestion is to dump the use of the 18 gauge brads. There is absolutely no reason to use anything bigger than 3/4" x 3/4" material for this type of internal joint block. Use flat head wood screws placed into pre-drilled countersunk clearance holes in these glue blocks. Then apply glue to the block faces where it meets the cabinet sides and install the ...


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I don't know where you live, but in large areas there will be a plywood supplier and he almost certainly has pre-kerfed MDF and such.


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Varnish is a clear, transparent substance that is used on woods. But why? Well, not only does it give the wood a shiny glow, it also blocks up the tiny holes in the wood.This prevents the wood from absorbing the water, which can cause it to swell, rot and smell quite badly


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You're going to need some way to rip material to width. Cheapest would be a hand-held circular saw, and a long straight-edge & clamps (or steady hand). Better option would be a table or radial arm saw.


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For tools: I own a Porter Cable FN250B 16 gauge brad nailer and it's great for this type of application. It costs more but you will also get a range from 3/4 to 2 1/2 inches. It is on Amazon for a $140 ($92 used). I'd recommend selecting the material before buying the miter saw. A ten inch saw is only going to handle up to six inch material, so if you ...


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If you are fixing this to a wall with drywall on it, you will need 2 1/2" long finish nails to toenail it with, at the tongue edge. If you are staining it, DO NOT face nail it. If you are painting it, well nail it anywhere you please. The wood you are planning to use will work very well, make sure it will give you the look you want by making a sample, say 3' ...


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When you set out to make curved sections by bending thin flexible material (whether that be plywood or kerf cut solid wood) it is almost essential that you pre-make a form to bend around and allow for clamping of the material. This form can be made using low cost 1/2 inch plywood cut in the flat with the edge fitted to the inside dimension of the target ...


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There's a fair amount of detail work there, but I don't see anything hugely difficult. Curves: others have mentioned the standard approaches, eithr build up a blank from segments and then cut to shape or use wood-bending techniques. Correction yo my first thought: flat painted ring with bent/stained/varnished molding would achieve most of the effect at ...


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That is a very expensive podium, probably has a cost in the 20K range. You can do laminated wood and then cut into the curve (very expensive as it takes a large amount of high quality wood) or you can try some cheaper options using plywood. If you only need to do a slight curve, thin plywood has a lot of flex in it. Just nail/screw it onto a frame. If ...


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Honestly for solid wood boards (hardwood in your case) just applying wood glue and clamping would provide more than sufficient strength to hold the weight of a cat. Simple glue joints are used to make table tops without additional fasteners. The strength of the glue joint is generally stronger than the wood itself and since your boards have already been ...


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Part of it depends on what material you're using for the top. If it's hardwood or plywood, a good quality wood glue and biscuits / dowels / pocket screws will likely hold it together just fine. If it's something like MDF or OSB, then I'd want some additional joining mechanism such as dog bone fasteners. Braces below are fine, as long as they don't ...


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As you surmise, the biscuits offer very little in added strength in a construction of this sort. The primary strength in a biscuit construction is in the overall glue joint, and on a thin piece, that is problematic. This is even more problematic when the piece is horizontal rather than vertical and when some weight might be applied, stressing the joints. Not ...


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Generally a good workflow, but a few tips- before gluing, stain (and possibly finish) inside areas that will be hard to reach once assembled. Tape off glue joint mating surfaces if you do this, so that stain / finish doesn't get in the joint.


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Your original sequence is good, except for one step you have out of place--sanding. You need to glue everything together after you dry fit everything. The glue will ooze out of the joints someplace- it happens. If you can force a joint flush on dry assembly, I will guarantee you that it will not be the case when you glue it up. Sanding after glue up will rid ...


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For a beginner...nay...even a moderately experience woodworker, I'd say the workflow is more like this: plan cuts buy materials Cut/drill/etc realized you screwed up the cuts back to the lumber yard Cut/drill/etc realize you forgot one piece at the lumber yard back to the lumber yard Cut/drill/etc Dry fit realize you reversed one piece back to the lumber ...


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Buy a small or portable 10" table saw like a Bosch 4100. A table saw will make a much cleaner cut than a band saw and in general will be precise. Band saws are sloppy and do not handle large boards well. Also, a table saw is much easier to replace the blade, and you can switch out blades. Typically you will have a four blades: cross cut blade, a ripping ...


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Yes. There are books that can guide you step by step on projects while you are learning. Normally, finish is done last because otherwise you might mar the finish while doing working on the piece. Also, finish should be on the exterior surface of the work piece only, not inside the joints. The only way to ensure this is to finish the piece AFTER the joints ...


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It is possible to design a cabinet or chest of drawers without legs at all. However, in traditional cabinetry, the legs are actually part of the structure. If you study traditional furniture, you will see that these legs have a specific purpose. They typically go from the floor to the top of the piece in each of the 4 corners. The legs are load bearing, and ...


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The main reason is that woodworking of old days, Joinery was more of an art than a mechanised given. The structure was designed to accommodate for wood settling and fluctuating due to weather conditions (humidity etc) ... Basically, the most stable structure was one, where the weight rested on the four points which were the most stable (the legs or balls) ...


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Blindly following what went before. Because people buying furniture don't think a box right on the floor is "furniture". Ratchet Freak is quite right as well... I suppose at some point in the past it kept them off the mud and dank of the dirt or stone floor, and thus had a functional purpose, largely long-lost. I rather like the Shaker solution of putting ...


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Z-clips are french cleats made from aluminum- they come in all kinds of lengths and keep the hanged piece about 3/16 from the wall- they will have holes to attach one piece to the wall/studs and the other to screw to the back-they can hold a lot of weight (we've hung whole mahogany wall panels with them) The item can easily slide left to right to center. ...


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As @OrgnicLawnDIY suggests, use french cleats. These are 1x4 or 1x6 boards cut on a 45 degree angle. The lower section has the short side against the wall and the upper section, attached to the item to be hung, lowers into the trough created to snug the piece into the wall. Many carpenters use strips of 3/4" or 1 " plywood instead of solid boards. You can ...


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What you described with the 45 degree bevel is called a french cleat. It's used for securing heavy items to walls and I've seen them used in upper kitchen cabinet installations. 1x6 hardwood cut in half on a 45 I think would suffice. I would consider putting one on the top and one on the bottom (mounted upside down) if you have enough room to slide the ...


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Utilize a big enough Flat panel TV mount. This would keep the mount itself hidden, keep it close to the wall, and provide the strength you need to keep it on the wall. You'd just need to find a way to affix the art to the mount without destroying the art ... If you are not afraid of what exactly is attached to the back, epoxy might do the trick. Applying ...


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Hand-held jigsaws are not the right tool for cutting large notches in a 6x6 post. Yes, the blade must extend past the wood - they only cut on the front of the blade, not the bottom. And the blade will drift quite a bit going through 6 inches of lumber. Jigsaws are meant for fine detail work, not large straight cuts. However, a close cousin is the ...


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I would do this with multiple passes with a table saw, using a jig and standing the piece on its end to get the proper orientation. Carefully cutting it with a band saw would do pretty good to, but not everybody has a table or band saw. Compared to a jig saw, for this type of cut, you may do as good with a circular saw. It would not be the safe way to do it ...



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