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I agree with the first answer, however, I think you may have used and oil based stain with a water based poly on top. The answer is still the same however....You need to sand it down and use only water based stain with the water based poly or both oil based, however you choose.


1

Most likely you have spots of contamination such as oil or wax impregnated into the wood. As much as you may not want to hear this, I fear you may need to strip the table top again and sand the surface more completely. When the surface is clean and sanded, you can mist the surface with a little water to see if any areas repel the water. Don't let the water ...


1

you can build the table with two legs on two sides, just like the coffee table in the picture. This can keep the stability.


2

Using two legs at a "T" will result in a table that is very prone to tipping. In the diagram below, the sum of the moments (torque) about the R1-R2 axis must be zero for the table to remain in equilibrium. Just before the table tips, all the reaction force from the legs against the floor will be concentrated at R1 and R2. If the weight of the table at the ...


0

I believe you cannot make this stable as you may like. Since you will be placing the narrow leg, the one going parallel with the length, there will be 18" of top extending beyond the thickness of the plywood leg. The other end of the table will be ok, it will only have 8 or 9" overhang of the leg if you use the 20" leg there. If you oriented the legs at a 45 ...


5

Thank you to everyone for your insight! I made a quick stop at the Lowes down the street and picked up a few inexpensive options you all mentioned. The one that absolutely stood out for my purposes was the drill rasp. As soon as I began I knew it was the one. I went back over 4 holes, each taking about 1-2 minutes to effectively widen and shape. I was ...


4

Three methods I can think of. Enlarge by friction Your idea of wrapping the bit in sandpaper isn't even bad. The only "right" way to do this is a different bit, and that's not even worht it. You just probably used the wrong sandpaper. Try some 80 grit and make sure to go in a back and forth pattern, roughly every half inch you plunge. There also exists ...


2

I am not saying that this way is the best nor is it recommended on high-end finishes but I simply would maneuver the current bit around the hole until it was bigger. You will get to 1/16" quickly with this method. To make it more effective just keep the bit perpendicular to the board at all times and don't put a ton of force on the edges. I will also put ...


10

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


4

I think your best bet is to use a sanding process to open up the hole. It may take a while but should get you there eventually. When I had a similar problem I took a piece of 1/2 inch diameter birch dowel rod (about nine inches long) and cut a slot across its end. Then inserted a folded over piece of sand paper to make a two sided flap sander. Chucked into ...


6

While I can't speak to the quality of all manufacturers blades, in general the blade that comes with the saw is of no lower quality than any other blade offered by the manufacturer. Most miter saws come with a 24 tooth FTG (Flat Top Grind) blade, which is good for fast course cuts. If you're looking to chop 2x lumber, this blade will work fine for you. If ...


1

I am not a cabinet maker at all. I own a 12" Dewalt compound. I replace the blade once a year and it gets used a lot. I buy blades comparable to the stock. The saw has basically cut any object that you can imagine. It handles baseboards OK, and on some door trim. Mainly it is just used for framing and cutting odds and ends. When I have a crew doing ...


3

I don't know if I'd go as far as to call the stock blades "crap", but most of the stock ones are going to be basically all-purpose blades. I use mine mainly for framing, and the stock blade was actually a little nicer than I need for what I'm using it for. If you're going to use it for cabinetry, you'll likely want to get a blade for it geared toward that ...


1

This can't be done on the table saw? Set the fence to the wide side and take off the 1/8"


3

Razor scrapper would work best with a little mineral spirits.



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