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1

I'd suggest that you get angled metal L-brackets. Clamp these on both sides of your cut line such that the saw blade fits between them. This will keep the cut to a tight line. The closer the clamps the cleaner the cut, but also the more wear on your saw, potentially. Widening the clamps will allow more stray in your cut (deal with that with planing and ...


3

I've never used a Japanese-style saw, but have always found it easier to keep a long cut straight with the rigid blade of a tenon saw than with a carpenter's saw. Held at a fairly shallow angle, a tenon saw can make an indefinitely long cut in material up to about 12mm thick. Then finish with a jack plane with a very sharp blade set shallow.


2

Cutting shallower (with the handle closer to the work) will encourage the saw to cut a straight line. Cutting steeper (with the handle up high) gives you more maneuverability. Start the cut being careful to keep the blade in line with the cut. As you cut deeper, lower the handle to about 30 degrees. The blade will want to keep cutting in the same straight ...


1

I have a large t-square designed for doing drywall work, but it's great for many other things. I think the long side is about 4-5 ft long. Use that as a guide. It's great not just for cutting, but for layout as well. Something like this


1

I have found that the stiffer the saw blade, the more accurate it is at long push/pull cuts. You are probably getting a lot of bend when you push the saw back into the plywood. My two sided saw is somewhat flimsy and so I found the following process really helps. Cut only on the pull Slide the blade back in, do not cut. Cut again on the pull It is ...


4

First off be aware of a couple of important points. In the old days before there ever was electricity and power tools craftspersons could build amazing things out of wood with hand tools along. Woodworking, similar to any other craft, takes patience and practice. Plywood material such as you are proposing to work with is a modern thing invented in the age ...


0

best way to accurately cut a rectangle or square from a plywood sheet with underpowered hand tools I would say the best way is to use power tools. At the bare minimum use a guide - clamp 2 straight boards on either side of the cut with a gap just wide enough for the saw. Aluminum angle works well - it's straight, hard enough that the saw won't wander ...


5

Sounds like what you're after is resawing-- which is typically done on a band saw with a wide blade. Then you have to clean up the saw marks, which does take some thickness away. So you may end up with two 3/8" pieces rather than 1/2".


0

The trick here is to actually have the lid start out as part of the box, so that the grain of the wood all runs right across the separation between box and lid. One way this can be accomplished is to build a solid "block", and then turn that into a box. You first cut off a "lid" off of the solid block, and then by one means or another, hollow out the ...


1

I think you can do this with a router. Create a template in some thin material using one of the methods above. Hole saw, circle cutter, jigsaw, even a hand saw, etc. Sand it until it is as perfect as you can get it. Then somehow tack it down to your 33mm stock (nails or screws), and use a flush cutting router bit with pilot bearing to cut the thick stock. ...


1

While a 4 1/2 inch hole saw will do the trick it would be an expensive investment if this is a one time project. The hole saw will leave a center hole from the pilot drill. You may be able to limit this to one side of the disk if you removed the pilot drill just prior to finishing the cut. You will also need a hefty drill with a 1/2 inch chuck. I would ...


2

This can probably be done with 4.5" hole saw which is pretty close to your dimensions. I assume what you want is the disk, not the hole. A circular disk can also be cut with a scroll saw. Another tool is an adjustable circle cutter or fly cutter of which there are few different types. A circle can also be cut using a mill (or lathe) with a milling ...


4

My suggestion is to dump the use of the 18 gauge brads. There is absolutely no reason to use anything bigger than 3/4" x 3/4" material for this type of internal joint block. Use flat head wood screws placed into pre-drilled countersunk clearance holes in these glue blocks. Then apply glue to the block faces where it meets the cabinet sides and install the ...



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