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2

Another traditional approach to reinforcing cracked wood is to install a "butterfly key" (also known as "bowtie key"). This is essentially an inlaid piece that acts as a pair of dovetail joints to tie the two sides together. Keys can be as larger or small as desired, in similar wood or contrasting wood ... the latter is a bit more common since the key's ...


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1/4" steel flat stock, one under each end, cut to width. With counter sunk holes for short, pan-head lag screws. Fancy installations will have an area routed for this piece, making it flush to the surface. Ideally it runs under the legs, sharing two out of the four fasteners per leg. Sort of like this:


5

The attached pieces and legs may have exacerbated the effects by not moving with the seat but a piece of pine of that size was probably destined to crack regardless. You can try to weep glue down into it (run a line of yellow glue over the crack then blow it down into the void with an air nozzle) and then clamp out the space but it probably won't be ...


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For structural applications, I prefer framing angles because: End grain nailing is almost always poor practice. Good quality toenailing is often difficult to achieve for people who are out of practice, e.g. non-carpenters working on a one-off joint. Framing angles can reduce the need to hold a piece in place while making the first fastening. Framing angles ...


3

Nails are generally put in at 90 degrees to the wood (i.e. straight in), unless you are "toe-nailing". (see picture) It all really depends on the application. As opposed to just nailing straight in, like if you were nailing together a built-up beam (face nailing) - Toe nailing the wood is usually not bearing much or any weight on the nails, they are ...


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am wondering what the correct approach is I don't think there is a single correct approach. It really depends on the application and on personal preference. Hammering nails in at an angle can help them to resist forces that run in the same direction as a nail hammered in at 90 degrees to the wood. For building construction, in my part of the world, ...


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They really are different tools. You can do things with a bandsaw that you simply can't with a table saw, and vice versa. If you need to cut curves, or cut stock thicker than 3.5", or similar tasks a bandsaw wins; if you need to cut pieces to exactly repeatable sizes, or cut wide pieces, or make dados (extended non-through cuts) or coves, table saw wins. If ...


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Fasten it to the floor. A table designed like this really needs to be secured. Remove the table from its base and attach it to the floor joists with brackets, from the inside (find those joists or it may pull up the flooring). Unless you're going to bevel-in a removable decorative center piece (to allow access inside the pillar and a means to attach the top) ...


1

If the base is hollow and open at the bottom, I would try making it slide around something heavy. Make a concrete block or something that will fit fairly tightly inside the base. Make it a bit shorter than the base to ensure the table goes all the way to the floor. Then when you setup the table you sit the block on the floor, lift up the table and slide ...


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Solutions in which the table cannot easily move: Make a base plate, as you suggest. But route out a section of your floor and make the base plate closely resemble the floor, then set the whole thing into the routed-out hole. Get several L-shaped brackets and use them to bolt the table to the floor. Ugly. Make the base hollow with a secretly removable ...


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It occurred to me that this problem has already been solved... Gumball machines and/or coin-op toy dispensers at the grocery store are capable of selecting just one of something. A quick search reveals a solution like this: Seem to me you may be able to adapt your design to work something like that. Even if not, I'd look at gumball machine designs... ...


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The size of the hole should not be more than 1.2 to 1.5 times the size of the marble size, if its too large the balls will begin to come in pairs and get stuck, However I think your problem is the lack of funnelling in the ball receptacle, A good idea would be to buy a paintball dispenser from a paintball gun.


3

I would just drill pilot holes and screw it together, you don't need to do fancy cuts in the wood. If you need extra stability, put in a diagonal (diagonal cuts all the way across a board are much easier than notching). I would put in a small diagonal brace on each corner, although it would be easier to just use a large one across the whole frame. I built a ...


2

Which way is the 90 degrees connection going? ie are the pieces of wood in the same plane (a flat joint)? If they are, you could use a use a half-lap joint (or perhaps a mitre). Or are the pieces of wood in different planes? This gives you various options for the joint, for example: Rebated joint. Mitre Biscuit joint (possibly also with a mitre) Box / ...


4

How do I connect [1x4 wood] together at 90 degrees while maintaining a solid connection? If you can obtain a hand-saw (e.g. tenon-saw/back-saw), some sandpaper and some wood glue, you can make lap-joints. I find they are the easiest way for me to make rigid joints in wood. To join wood the other way, for a strong joint I'd try a simple finger joint ...


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One immediate thought I had was if you used metal pipes. What I mean by that is to purchase some flanges and mount those into the studs. Then you can tighten a metal pole into that which then will act as the brace. Then by cutting holes through the 2x4s of the bench you can slide it on. Its the same principle as those cheap floating shelves from Home ...


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Other methods: Drill with the spade bit then put the log in a lathe and enlarge the hole out with a boring tool. As above but put the boring bit in the lathe and bring the log to the tool. You'd do this if the log is too big for the lathe. Drill lots of small holes covering the area of the intended hole, then chisel out the remaining wood.


5

The tool you need is a 2 1/2" Forstner bit. There's going to be a lot of torque resistance, so you may need to use a drill press instead of just a handheld drill.


8

You want a Forstner bit and an extension shaft.


2

There's a good product that I have used before called 'Ronseal Multipurpose Wood Filler Tub - Dark' you can pick it up for about £6 from the likes of Homebase etc. It gives a nice finish to fill the wood cracks and it dries dark. Can also be used for exterior furniture


4

In many cases that is epoxy, mixed with lamp black or another colorant. (There are tints which can be used to more closely match the color of the surrounding wood, but in fact black usually looks pretty reasonable.)


3

I'd look at a running some braces from underneath the front of the bench back to the wall at a 45 degree angle or so. That will hold a lot of weight.



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