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1

One possibility would be to get a piece of quarter-round and glue or otherwise affix it to the edges of a flat-sided piece of wood matching the non-rounded dimensions that you need. The corners will need to be dealt with, and could be cut with a lot of work with a random orbital sander. Another option is to shape the quarter-round by hand as suggested ...


3

I would expect that most retail outlets do not offer to run wood through a shaper or do router work. What you really want to look for is a crafts-person that has the tools to do this for you. If your intent is to avoid having to pay someone to do a project like this then take the opportunity to figure out how you can do it yourself. There are a number of ...


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Depending on how deeply you've set those posts, the braces you show may not be adding any significant amount of rigidity. Diagonal bracing would be better, but may be overkill. My 5'-high platform for two rain barrels (with posts sunk 3' deep) has no braces on the thin ends, and has diagonals only to provide more support to the middle of the longer sides. ...


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I wouldn't trust it with a rain barrel. The braces interfere at the laps, which adds some rigidity, but I'd either use diagonal bracing or rely on diaphragm strength, e.g. 3/4" exterior plywood screwed not nailed to the posts. [ edit/afterthought: You might also consider the possibility that, under strain, the braces shown could split lengthwise at the ...


3

If this is for studwork, i.e. constructing internal wood-framed walls, doorways etc, a 22" 7tpi saw should be suitable. You would use a finer-toothed saw if you need a better finish with less tear-out/splintering, or if cross-cutting very narrow pieces. Unless you are sawing large logs, the saw should be ok for a variety of uses.


4

Any screw with a flat shoulder will work just fine. The trick is not splitting the material or protruding. Have a close look at the end of the included drill bit. It has a tip that creates the beginning of the pilot hole for the screw. Make that hole deeper and the proper diameter and you can use any kind of fastener you want.


7

Yes, those are special pocket hole screws. They're basically just self drilling wood screws (which is why they have the fluted tips). Standard wood screws may work, but you are forced between trying to center a pilot hole at the bottom of your pocket or risk splitting the piece you're screwing into. As far as finding more of them, just search for "pocket ...


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Normally if it's a 1/4" router as sold, you cannot use anything larger. If it could take a 1/2" collet, it would be sold that way. A 1/2" router will normally come with a 1/4" collet as well, and for some a 3/8" collet can be purchased aftermarket (handy if available, since many standard milling cutters are 3/8" shank.) Usually a 1/2" is a better choice for ...


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This would be a great question at the new Woodworking Beta Now as to your question, without a model number and make, it's hard to tell. Some 'trim router' models only accept 1/4" shank bits, but most full-sized routers will take either 1/4" or 1/2" bits, with the appropriate collet.


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There's no single answer, since it depends on the expected load. Use a calculator like this one


2

This may be a good question for the new woodworking forum, since it is furniture related. What you have there is good enough to support a small playhouse or shed, definitely good for mattresses and occupants. Your main concern will be the side to side stresses, the fastening of the posts to the sides, and what it would take to make a "quiet" joint. I am ...



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