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65

Reciprocating Saw Most fun. Miter Saw Fastest. Circular Saw Most likely to have on hand. Jig Saw Slow. Hand Saw Slower. Butter knife Slowest. Pruning Saw Longest reach. Fire Cut right to the chase Beaver Requires lots of training, food, and cleanup (thanks @SteveJackson for pointing this method out). Chain saw By popular ...


25

Yes, the drill chuck will mar the finish of the shelf. There is a slight chance of damage to the chuck. Plus, choking down on the bit, like that, obscures your view of the hole (the drill and chuck block it) -- making precision harder to accomplish. The correct way to do this is to use a drill stop. Drill stops are less likely to slip than tape or ...


23

I usually just wrap a piece of masking tape around the drill bit leaving the correct length exposed. You can either wrap enough layers of tape around so that it is fairly thick, or leave a "flag" of tape sticking out. Either way will let you drill to the proper depth without the risk of marking the surface. The metal jaws of a drill can easily damage the ...


15

It has to do with how far back the blade goes on the down (non cutting) stroke. It's usually called the "Pendulum Stroke adjustment." The idea being that it will move the blade back, out of the way of the material on the down stroke. It reduces the load on the saw when cutting thick materials, at the cost of a bit more splintering. Use a setting of 0 ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


12

I would suggest using a hardwood like "teak" as it is commonly used in environments where it is exposed to water such as on boats and for outdoor furniture.


12

ApplePly is a brand name for an all-hardwood veneer plywood that is higher quality than your typical construction or cheap hardwood plywoods. (You may want to confirm that your "applewood" plywood is truly ApplePly). ApplePly should be similar in quality to baltic birch plywoods and like baltic birch it is not supposed to contain voids. You can find these ...


12

Depending on how much left over wood you have, you may consider checking to see if your community has a building supply recycling center. I live in a relatively small town and we have a non-profit organization here that takes donations of left over building supplies and used (but usable) materials that have been removed as part of a remodel (faucets, doors, ...


12

The sanding of coats in-between is to give the new coat something to adhere to. It roughs up the surface just enough to give it a bit of grip. Multiple coats is the same as anything else. Multiple coats makes the coating thicker, stronger and more lustrous. Cars have multiple coats of paint to protect the body; you paint your walls with multiple coats to ...


12

you can use a bit of scrap wood that is the length of the expose drill bit minus the depth you want to drill so that when fully drilled through with the chuck touching the scrap it will only leave the desired drill depth exposed this way you can use the scrap as a guide as you drill and also ensure the hole is square that or use a drill press if you have ...


11

The simplest solution is to drill the dowel hole after you fit the joint together. Fit the joint and make sure everything's square and true, then drill straight through the mortice and tenon in one go and insert the dowel. Chisel/plane and sand it flush and you should be good to go. Making a mark on the outside of the mortice where you want to drill will ...


11

I don't have direct experience but generally speaking while a circular saw blade can go through nails, it's dangerous as it increases the risk of a kick back. Although slower, you will be far safer if you cut the counter using a reciprocating saw with a demolition or dual wood/metal blade attached. That will cut through nails without the kickback ...


11

I'd make a template in the shape of a square donut out of 1/2" plywood by using a table saw to cut out the square hole in the 1/2" plywood. For example, if ... i) the recess in the desktop needs to be 8"x12" ii) the diameter of the base of the router is 6" iii) the diameter of the router bit is 1/2" ... then I'd ... 1) start with a rectangular piece ...


11

I decided to try to install a cross brace inside the cabinet to spread the walls enough so the drawers would fit. I made a trip to the hardware store and picked up: A 1x6 pine board Angle brackets with screws Then I: measured the front opening of the cabinet. cut a piece off the pine board 2mm longer than the cabinet is wide. used a rubber mallet to ...


10

I will show how to build a simple A-frame swingset from pressure-treated four-by-fours and scraps, with minimal cutting. From a six-inch-wide pressure-treated board (e.g., a 5/4-inch by 6 inch deck board), cut four isosceles trapezoids with bases that are 11 and 16 inches. Take two legs (8-foot-long 4x4s) and align them with the legs of one of the ...


10

The difference between a 10" 60T and 80T saw blade is only slightly noticeable. In practice, chip out with either isn't a huge concern, provided you go slow. An 80T blade is naturally going to slow you down more, so that may be useful if your tendency is to yank the radial arm down and go. Another consideration is the end grain of the piece, some trees ...


10

They are referred to as "Nail on Glides" at my local hardware store. They can be found near the other hardware like the hinges, locks, and door stops.


10

IF you have this sliced, you might want to coat/paint the ends with wax/paint or something to keep it from drying on the ends faster than the center. A recommendation I remember a LONG time ago was 1 year per inch of thickness to dry a green wood. Best done in the actual location it will be used - or for instance, the basement of the home if it is not damp ...


10

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


9

For what it's worth I've used a 6" stacked dado set in my small 10" saw for years without any issues. My understanding is that dado blades should always be smaller than the saw's rated blade size due to the increased load of cutting a wide dado over just cutting a saw kerf width. The smaller diameter means your saw will be able to exert more force on the ...


9

Put the table/chair on a very flat and very horizontal surface. Ensure and double check with a levelgauge. shim the table/chair so that the top surface of the table/chair is level using the level gauge Take a pencil and tape it on a small block that is about the height you want the legs to shorten. Ensure that the block has parallel bottom and top planes. ...


9

If it's a hand tool not designed to be mounted in that manner, I would advise against doing this as it has the potential to be dangerous. Think about what would happen if the tool were to become dislodged or the blade break off. In the event of an emergency, how would you quickly shut it off? Saws like table saws and band saws should have an easily ...


9

A 60 tooth is a fine blade for semi-smooth finish cuts. Cuts on flooring are always at the wall ends, so even a 40 is good for that since the baseboard trim goes over the cut. You should be leaving a 1/4 inch expansion gap at he ends anyway, so they won't show. The DeWalt 12" blade is a good long lasting blade. It has good balance, heat dissipation and takes ...


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


9

You could use one of the many variations of the mortise and tenon joint, depending on the look you're going for. Though I agree with HerrBag, that the strength of a mortise and tenon joint should not rely on glue. Tusk Tenon This is a through tenon variation, where a wedge is used to lock the joint together. Fox tail (Wedged) Tenon This is another ...


8

I would suggest a wood that dries and doesn't mold easily. Something like a bamboo or cedar should work well. Also, don't bother polyurethane'ing it, because the coating will just start to peel off with the humidity in the tub.


8

Route the pieces, cut the miter, then assemble. I believe that will give the best look. You could just practice all three on some scrap to see which you like.



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