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23

I'd use plywood with a thicker piece of hardwood glued onto the front edge. This gives you very good strength. Here is an online calculator I use to find what kind of materials you can use and the amount of sag you will have. Here's a good quote from the author of the site. “The eye will notice a deflection of 1/32″ per running foot.” The sagulator


14

Read the instructions on the can. See what the manufacturer recommends. Sandpaper is fairly useless on polyurethane because the heat generated by the friction causes the polyurethane to melt and block up the grit. And the finer the grit, the faster it gets blocked up. I have been using polyurethane for more than 30 years. Here is my routine to achieve a ...


14

I use 220 grit. You sand polyurethane to (a) remove any dust bumps in the lower coat, and (b) cut the surface of the lower coat so that the upper coat has more surface area to bond to. You don't need the lower coat to be super-smooth because the upper coat will cover the roughness from sanding anyway. For application, I use a china bristle brush. I've ...


13

The short ends you pictured are the cross grains of the board. What I see is that you have used a too course sandpaper on these edges. This should be easy to fix. You need to step down the grit of the sand paper. any final sanding should be done with 220 or 320 paper. On these end details, use fine paper, break it's (paper's) back so it is flexible, and ...


12

Strong and light and cheap? Take a look at torsion box construction. Granted it's not exactly thin but as @Joe mentioned, getting all four of those qualities is a tall order.


11

MDF is medium density fiberboard. It is essentially an amalgamation of sawdust, wood chips, and binders. Sorta like dried oatmeal. Cons: MDF is a pain to work with if you have to remodel later or install hardware several times, as the more you drill it, the less sturdy it becomes and begins to flake. It will also split if not pilot hole drilled. MDF does ...


11

Well first off: that's not oak. It's larch or southern yellow pine (maybe even hemlock) from the look of it. As for color, that looks very near to the natural color of softwood after some yellowing from age but its hard to say. It appears to be production grade furniture (although of a fairly high quality) which means the colorant(stain), if any, is a ...


10

I have used MDF for a number of furniture building applications. Shelving, cupboards, cabinets (body and doors). It is easy to work into interesting shapes, you can cut curves using a jigsaw and sand it easily. If you sand off any of the surface, and on the cut ends, you get a very different finish than on the front/back surfaces. If you want to get a ...


9

Pine is a difficult wood to stain under the best of situations. Pine has areas of different density, color, and resin (pitch) content. Using a product like Minwax prestain helps a bit. Follow the timing instructions carefully when using a pre-treatment. Little tips: i like to apply a liberal coat of oil based stain with a sponge brush. Let it set a few ...


9

Put the table/chair on a very flat and very horizontal surface. Ensure and double check with a levelgauge. shim the table/chair so that the top surface of the table/chair is level using the level gauge Take a pencil and tape it on a small block that is about the height you want the legs to shorten. Ensure that the block has parallel bottom and top planes. ...


9

It could possibly be done using Mortise and Tenon joints, however, it looks like this table simply uses Hanger Bolts. If you look at a picture from the bottom of the table, you'll notice there are holes bored in the underside of the table top. This is likely where the nut would be attached to the bolt, which is in turn screwed into the leg.


8

You want strong and cheap and light and thin? You're asking for a lot. You can get lighter by making a laminated shelf with honeycomb in between ... but it won't be that cheap, or all that thin. You can get cheap and light by adding a couple of stringers along the bottom as stiffeners, but it won't be all that thin. You could use something other than ...


8

I just had another random thought on this ... hollow door blanks. Yes, it's thicker, and you'd have to get them just the right length, as you can't trim 'em down too much, but the construction would make it quite stiff ... it's actually similar to the honeycomb idea ... the honeycomb isn't to give strength, it's to make sure that the top and bottom layer ...


8

You could try a plywood shelf with a run of EMT or other rigid pipe underneath. Hang the pipe with some closet flanges, and then lay the shelf on top of those. To cover it up, you could paint the pipe, and cover the front of the shelf with a face frame.


8

Some background, there are two types of wood water stains. White rings and black marks. White rings form when the water has only made it into the finish, this is the "best" kind of stain to have. Black marks occur when the water has penetrated into the wood itself. This is slightly harder to fix and will ultimately require either sanding or covering it with ...


8

Although similar to the tooth pick trick, a real good and solid fix it to drill out the stripped hole to a size 1/32 inch smaller than a piece of hardwood dowel. Apply a good wood glue to the dowel and tap it into the clean drilled out hole. After the glue has dried, flush cut and sand the dowel smooth to the wood surface. Now drill a small pilot hole and ...


8

Disassemble It will be easier to work with if you can take the furniture apart, or at least break it down in to smaller pieces. If you can't take it apart, you'll still want to remove any doors or drawers. Sand You'll want to sand the surfaces that will be painted, with 220 grit sand paper. Be careful not to sand too much, you don't want to sand ...


8

It's called "blocking" and often happens w/latex paints - especially if the 1st coat wasn't allowed to dry fully before the second coat was applied. It's not much of an issue on walls, but horizontal surfaces are a different story. The ultimate solution is time - possibly a few months. The inner coat's moisture is blocked from evaporating by to outer coat. ...


7

This sounds like a problem that's best avoided rather than solved. I'm picturing a "classic" wooden bar stool where the legs are not vertical, but tapered out to be wider at the bottom than the top, e.g.: This means that the legs experience a bending load when someone sits on the stool (imagine someone trying to pull the legs wider apart at the bottom). ...


7

Dove tail joints are not a good option for any type of furniture that you would later hope to take back apart. Dove tails are designed to make a strong and attractive joint that is meant to be permanent. For advice on how to create effective joints that are straight forward to put together and take apart take a study of the techniques used by kit furniture ...


6

Put shelf boards on horizontal rods of steel which are set into drilled holes in the wall, with the rods perpendicular to the length of the shelf. Grooves may be cut in the bottom of the boards to fixate them on the rods. Depending on the thickness of the boards, you may even be able to hide the rods. Yay! Magic Shelf! This will only work if your wall is ...


6

There are 2 basic categories for wood finishes; those that penetrate, and those that coat. Linseed oil, wax, "hand rubbed polish" finishes are all examples of a penetrating finish. Varnish, lacquer, shellac are examples of coating finishes. There are many different reasons to choose one over the other. Some factors: what type of wood how will the wood be ...


6

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but there is no magic solution you can spray on and restore the original beauty. As an owner or an older Carver with lots of teak, the only solution is to sand it down. We solved the every year restoral ritual by using Seatrol medium sealer by Sikens. (found in marine stores) Couple of coats of this stuff and your teak ...


6

In theory you could cut off the lower end of each leg and later reattach using a double ended lag bolt (really a screw): This type of reconnection should be a one time thing. For repeated removal you could use a fastener called a "hanger bolt" that has a lag screw on one end and a machine screw on the other: The screw end would be placed in the cut ...


6

There are many ways to work out how to handle the outside corner for a built-in bookcase. One concept that I have used follows this plan: The spacing of the knickknack shelves does not necessarily need to follow that of the book shelves. This picture will help you visualize how it can end up looking.


6

It is also possible to do the final smoothing of the rough squared off faces by using a router. The router rides in a set of movable supports that you arrange over the end of the log and the router bit can cut to a smooth finish across the whole log face. As you make each pass with the router you slide the movable supports over an appropriate amount and then ...


6

This appears to be a "sawtooth shelf support" like the one shown in this article.


6

Your best bet is to have Sherwin-Williams do a stain match. The only thing I suggest otherwise is that when they ask you the wood type, you reply to them that you have white pine as that is what the furniture is. If I were trying to come close I would grab natural stain and satin polyurethane.


6

Speculation: I'm going to go with it is the panel just behind the drivers seat in a RV that makes a bed and covers the battery and the generator, as it has a fire coating applied by either Almex or Fritz Industries for a recreational vehicle probably manufactured in Canada.



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