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I would prime the desk and then coat it with Redgard. Sand after your prime. Put the Redgard down in thin coats with a foam roller and it will turn out very smooth. After 2 days it stiffens and will become very durable (and waterproof).


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While the consensus so far has been 'get rid of them', my first question was, how to work with them? I'm not looking to just pay money to get rid of something that could've lasted for over a hundred years just fine. My first question is still unanswered, how to repair the metal wrapping over the wood? Going further, how would one restore the wooden gutters? ...


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Well you can do one of a couple things. Stain the entire board. This may be the easiest option, just clean up the drips down the side a bit (sanding them). Then stain the sides and the back side of the board as well. Rub it on, let it sit for a couple minutes and then wipe it off. Unless of course as Keshlam mentioned you are working with a ...


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Unless you have a big enough pile to make snowballs...or sawdust balls rather. I wouldn't worry about it. It shouldn't hurt the grass and again unless the kids are rolling around it it, or licking it you should be just fine. In the First Aid section of the MSDS, for skin contact it says... For skin contact, wash immediately with soap and water. Get ...


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That's a hard thing to google. I can offer 2 possible approaches: 1.) I think you could do something like these doors with battens: http://www.appletree.me.uk/ledge&%20Brace1.GIF . You would have to turn the battens 90 degrees from the drawing since your facing boards are horizontal. The most important part would be the vertical battens on the left and ...


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Hardness is a good way to check wood for damage without pulling it apart. Take a nail and press it into the wood where you know the siding is in good shape. Then, do the same where you suspect damage. If the wood is softer, then you can assume it has some amount of water damage. If you want a more direct, verifiable method your best bet is to yank a ...


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Pocket screws are NEVER adequate for structural support. Something like this bed should be assembled with lags and carriage bolts, or better yet, Simpson brackets. Having said that, the most important joint in this piece is the connection between the bed rails and the posts so you could just use a combination of ship laps and bed bolts at those ...


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I have had success using it to build small items like shelves, speaker boxes, etc. I personally wouldn't use it for anything that would see a lot of action, vibrations, etc., because of concern over the fasteners working loose. Also, unless sealed really well, MDF really starts falling apart if it gets wet/soaked. If you are planning on using it, I would ...


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When I built my similar workbench, I let the 2 x 4 around the outside stand 1/4" above the surface of the bench, and then cut a piece of masonite as a replaceable bench top. Masonite with a coat of clear varnish makes a nice surface and I have replaced it 2 or 3 times.


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Depending upon the varnish that got used, or more specifically depending upon that varnish's UV resistance, it may darken (yellow) soon from exposure to the sun. If it was a spar varnish, it'll withstand UV much longer. Either way, count on revarnishing after several years (less if non-spar varnish, more if spar varnish). Walnut-stain varnish over ...


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I'll try to take your questions one-by-one. You have two easy options for leveling the chalk line. The first would be to use a carpenter's level; you'd measure 34" from the floor at one end of the bench-to-be, then hold a long 2x4 to the studs with one end right at the mark. Lay your level on the top of the 2x4 and tip the 2x4's other (not at a mark) end ...


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The maximum load you can place on a relatively slender column such as a table leg is usually dictated by the buckling strength, rather than the compressive strength. The critical load can be calculated using Euler's formula applied to a fixed-free column: Pcr= (pi^2*EI)/(f*Le^2) where E is the modulus of elasticity I is the area moment of inertia ...


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Try using oxalic acid - you may be able to buy it at the local hardware store as "wood bleach"; it comes in crystal form to be mixed with water. Pity, though, to take that marvelous color out of sapele! Good thing you didn't buy bloodwood (muninga) or redheart... 8)


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With those dimensions, you should be fine... provided that you provide a lot of bracing (especially diagonal bracing) to prevent the table from "racking" (falling over sideways like a cardboard box with no ends), and also providing that you use a relatively strong (in compression) wood for overall construction. I think you're well within the safe ...


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Without photos, it's pretty difficult to answer your questions completely, but... the black stain can usually be removed with oxalic acid ("wood bleach"). As to the bowing along the seam... very often that sort of thing will return to more-or-less its original shape if allowed to dry really thoroughly. I'd leave that one alone until the Witching Hour. The ...


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Answer: yes, if scraping and thorough sanding (coarse, then medium, then fine grit) until smooth does not remove the old paint than feel free to prime and paint right over it. Do not pay attention to those that say "you must test for compatibility with the new paint" or "don't paint it with latex (water-based) paint if it might be old alkyd (oil-based) ...


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I would definitely prime the wood first. I've had nothing but bad experiences with the paint/primer combos, even the expensive one's. I live in a rural area and am limited in what I can get and I keep finding myself in conflict with clients over this issue. They've fallen for the gimmick that you can do the whole thing in two coats. Not true and like someone ...


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+1 on the stainless fasteners. TheSean, you're actually working with that pressure-treated lumber in its IDEAL condition for working. After it dries, it'll become much much harder & more prone to splitting. Right now it's very resilient, and every fastener you drive into it "wet" will become tighter as the wood dries out. Too, dried PT lumber will give ...



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