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I'd agree with User217623 on drilling the Ski-Rack to hit the studs with Lag screws. However, the 2x4 idea is fine, I'd go with Tee-Nuts on the backside of the 2x4's for the Ski-Rack mounting, so you can use large bolts. Use thick or double washers on everything, except the Tee-Nuts of course. Even Douglas Fir 2x4's are quite soft & will loosen over ...


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Assuming not much is as stake, the idea is reasonable if the rack will still 'work' when it is 1.5" from the wall. I suggest screws or lags of whatever type you have on hand, long enough to drive 1.5" into the stud, placed 3/4" from the top of the 2x4 cleat, one per stud, assuming you can tighten the screws enough to fasten the cleat tightly to the wall. ...


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Ed Beal is right. Assuming something like #10 or #12 screws (as opposed to 3/8" lag screws, for example), even if they collide the second will merely glance off the first. It's not an issue. To avoid the situation altogether, simply offset by 1/4" or so.


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When you drive the first screws, drive at 1 times your measure and 2 times your measure. Turn the corner and drive at 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 your measure of your measure. (Pick your measure to fit your space). For example if you have a five inch space to fasten, screw first 1 and 3 inches from the bottom, turn the corner and screw 2 and 4 inches from the bottom


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If you don't care that the wood will rot in 5-10 years then its ok. A retaining wall will be battling moisture from the soil. I don't know if you are having that issue or not, but generally you want the front of the wall to breath. My first thought about this was that it's like putting a finished wall in an underground basement. So I was thinking, you may ...


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The quick solution is a mending plate, or mending rings, which cover the damaged area with something decorative. Or pick a lockset whose decorative rose is large enough to cover that area.


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if your new handle set does not cover to bare areas (look for something with a large coverplate?), you will need to sand down the adjacent area so that no height difference between the painted area and the bare wood is noticeable. Anything less and you will see the damaged area. You can try to fill the recessed area with plaster(joint compound) and ...


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It is normal for that type of post in the south. To treat the wood and not affect the color use a linseed based sealer. The applicator I've linked to is only intended as a reference as there are several manufacturers and styles of rough surface applicators. Linseed Oil Linseed Oil Rough Surface Applicator


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You might be interested in a door jamb saw...


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you will have very mixed results applying a stain over any kind of preserving oil. the preexisting residual oil will prevent stain penetration, and as it weathers further, the old oil will continue to breakdown, leaving areas with none of the new stain. you can use tung oil or danish oil (both readily available in bc), but just remember, natural oil ...


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The oil that you use (or are thinking of buying) will typically list the coverage on the package or instructions as BMitch suggested in the comments. For instance, on the website you linked to for the instructions, they sell this (randomly chosen by me, no endorsement) counter top oil, and in the description it says: One litre covers approximately 13 ...


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This looks like solvent peeled up the urethane. I don't think you will have great success coloring it. The best way to do this is to re-finish the entire top of the table. It's not as bad as it sounds, but if you haven't done anything like that before, then get a professional to do it. Experience is necessary. The first thing I would do is sand the rings ...


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Stain markers are mostly felt pens. You can buy a kit of various colors. Surf the web using 'Stain Markers' as a search term and you will find plenty of suppliers. There is some art to this as each stained wood color needs a very close match to look real. Some of these stains also partially dissolve the existing stain so they merge together. Go slow and do ...


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How do I make clean, square cuts to the rafter (tail)? You may want to try to gently insert shims to add a little extra space between the rafter and the 1x4 roof boards. I would use a circular saw to start; you will not be able to cut all the way through (5") with a common circular saw, but it will give you a clean cut through a few inches. You'll need to ...


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I think your staggered-joint idea is a good one. From the look of it you'll have a solid enough base to get another decade or two from that tail. I'd cut back just enough to get solid wood at the center, then notch the sides back to wherever you can comfortably fit the saw. Something like so: | | |__ __| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | ...


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I would use a combination of approaches for this. To cut away the rotten wood I would use a small door jamb saw. It's handle is offset - it will make working in that space easier. You probably won't be left with much good wood. To shore up the rotten wood, I would inject epoxy. The West system is ideal for this. It's not cheap, but it's cheaper than taking ...


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You applied an oil base finish on top of a water base finish. It won't dry. A fix trick is apply another coat of water base finish on top of it.


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It's a vinyl fence. You could get a solid stain to match the color, but it won't be shiny. You could polyurethane it, but the sun degrades it after a couple of years, and you'll have to repeatedly refinish the fence.


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"Is it paint or stain?"- neither, that fence is made of plastic. It is manufactured that color. "Can cedar be prepared to look like it?" - the grain uniformity and absence of knots and defects is unrealistic, natural cedar will have natural imperfections. If you choose your lumber carefully you can select pieces that look nicest to you. A high quality ...


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That's a 2x4. It would look better on both sides of the fence if it were a 2x6 or 1x6, because then it would fully cover the posts. Nail them down from the top, into the 4x4 post.


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I had a similar stain on a counter top with a gloss acrylic type finish that appeared to absorb the printing from a plastic shopping bag. I knew from past experience that any kind of strong base solvent (acetone) will quickly dissolve and strip it, and harsh abrasives scratch. Several ordinary household cleaners did nothing. I tried a simple mix of olive ...


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Use 2x material... it's probably cheaper, stronger, and gives you more surface to screw into. (edit: this was based on the original question -- 'use 1x or 2x material?') 1/2" ply would probably be fine, but I'd suggest you upgrade to at least 5/8" ply (or whatever the horrible version of that is in the box stores -- 19/32"?!?) to skin the exterior. ...



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