Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I had exactly the same problem on a varnished wood table and yesterday came up with my own solution, washing up liquid mixed to a paste with washing powder applied with a sponge in a circular motion, it removed an 8 inch stain in15 minutes without any damage at all to the finish on the gloss varnish


0

What people "usually do" depends on specifics of local economics, climate, and availability of materials. I have a friend who lives in the Denver area. The soil there is awful and buying topsoil is very expensive. He spent $2,000 on lumber to build a backyard full of raised gardens with benches, then spent another $1,000 for different gravels to fill most ...


1

I don't know where you live, but in large areas there will be a plywood supplier and he almost certainly has pre-kerfed MDF and such.


0

You have a few options available to you, based on the material which you find. Provided that I understand how you want to assemble the structure you can do the following. Shop done Cutouts - mortice and tenon type joints Depending on the design of the structure, I would go with this route, Just get a wood shop to saw/router various cut-outs for you, ...


1

Coat the desk top with a UV resistant coating like a good marine spar varnish. Won't stop it completely but will slow it down significantly. If you get a desk top made of a real wood top (not a paper thin veneer over particle board) you can sand and restain in over and over when it fades too much.


0

The main purpose of building raised beds is to be able to grow in a custom soil mix because your current soil is poor. The raised bed soil is usually lighter, fluffier, holds more water and has more nutrients. It's more of a potting soil. Most flowers don't have very deep roots, especially annuals, and if you have a big difference in soil textures between ...


0

Adding any kind of barrier would be counterproductive. The key to good growing is good drainage.


2

If the raised bed is sitting on the ground no bottom is required. A bottom would only be required if you are protecting the surface below the raised bed. If the raised bed is set on a flat roof, a wooden deck, patio that would be subject to staining by the soil, etc. then you would want a bottom on it. You still need to allow for some drainage. A word of ...


0

When you set out to make curved sections by bending thin flexible material (whether that be plywood or kerf cut solid wood) it is almost essential that you pre-make a form to bend around and allow for clamping of the material. This form can be made using low cost 1/2 inch plywood cut in the flat with the edge fitted to the inside dimension of the target ...


2

There's a fair amount of detail work there, but I don't see anything hugely difficult. Curves: others have mentioned the standard approaches, eithr build up a blank from segments and then cut to shape or use wood-bending techniques. Correction yo my first thought: flat painted ring with bent/stained/varnished molding would achieve most of the effect at ...


3

That is a very expensive podium, probably has a cost in the 20K range. You can do laminated wood and then cut into the curve (very expensive as it takes a large amount of high quality wood) or you can try some cheaper options using plywood. If you only need to do a slight curve, thin plywood has a lot of flex in it. Just nail/screw it onto a frame. If ...


1

I'm with Lawrence on this, where there is blame, there is a claim. If you want to have a go at fixing however then go to a ships chandler and get a good glue from them. However, the trick is to clamp the pieces tight. I don't mean but some books on it but use something that has a vice-like grip spread over 3 or 4 inches. All that said, if this is an area not ...


0

The easiest would be to use a "deck bracket" or a "post bracket" available at your local DIY store: If you are worried that the screws would tear through the thin particle board of the bottom of your speaker, then I would first screw the post bracket to a 20cm x 20cm (8"x8") or larger square of 12mm (1/2") plywood, then use that to screw or glue to the ...


0

Carefully cut as much of the glue as possible with a utility knife. With a small pry bar, cats paw, or flat bar gently pry at the gap. If you can, cut some more glue while prying. you may also consider wedging a paint scraper,( not to be confused with a putty knife) in the gap, then hitting it with a hammer. At this point you have to weigh the risk of ...


0

The basic process I would use is Find out what type of paint was used (both primer and top-coat) so that I can obtain and apply a compatible paint. If I couldn't find out, I'd try overpainting a small area in an inconspicuous position and see what happens. Sand it flat using increasingly fine grades of sandpaper, then clean it. Buy new paint and ...


3

You will not make the crack go away, at least not with out destroying the texture of the finish. If the core material is particle board, it will be even more difficult. You could, as mentioned in the comment put something over it to flatten it, but it will take a driving force to set it back flush, or near flush. This is where particle board will NOT treat ...


1

Z-clips are french cleats made from aluminum- they come in all kinds of lengths and keep the hanged piece about 3/16 from the wall- they will have holes to attach one piece to the wall/studs and the other to screw to the back-they can hold a lot of weight (we've hung whole mahogany wall panels with them) The item can easily slide left to right to center. ...


3

As @OrgnicLawnDIY suggests, use french cleats. These are 1x4 or 1x6 boards cut on a 45 degree angle. The lower section has the short side against the wall and the upper section, attached to the item to be hung, lowers into the trough created to snug the piece into the wall. Many carpenters use strips of 3/4" or 1 " plywood instead of solid boards. You can ...


5

What you described with the 45 degree bevel is called a french cleat. It's used for securing heavy items to walls and I've seen them used in upper kitchen cabinet installations. 1x6 hardwood cut in half on a 45 I think would suffice. I would consider putting one on the top and one on the bottom (mounted upside down) if you have enough room to slide the ...


1

Utilize a big enough Flat panel TV mount. This would keep the mount itself hidden, keep it close to the wall, and provide the strength you need to keep it on the wall. You'd just need to find a way to affix the art to the mount without destroying the art ... If you are not afraid of what exactly is attached to the back, epoxy might do the trick. Applying ...


2

Hand-held jigsaws are not the right tool for cutting large notches in a 6x6 post. Yes, the blade must extend past the wood - they only cut on the front of the blade, not the bottom. And the blade will drift quite a bit going through 6 inches of lumber. Jigsaws are meant for fine detail work, not large straight cuts. However, a close cousin is the ...


1

I would do this with multiple passes with a table saw, using a jig and standing the piece on its end to get the proper orientation. Carefully cutting it with a band saw would do pretty good to, but not everybody has a table or band saw. Compared to a jig saw, for this type of cut, you may do as good with a circular saw. It would not be the safe way to do it ...


2

To the eye, wood grain is a change in color or evenness of the surface. It may take the form of subtle shading across a piece wide or narrow stripes running along or across darker or lighter colors around a blemish (such as a knot) in the wood strong figures, such as chevrons or swirls of a contrasting color small pits (open grain) running in broken lines ...


1

At its most basic, wood grain is the variable density of the concentric growth rings caused by seasonal changes, moisture availability and growth environment. For decorative purposes, wood burl, bird's eye, ray fleck, color variation between heartwood/sapwood and other growth oddities also enter into the equation. How it affects wood use and finish depends ...


0

As described in Wikipedia, "grain is a "...confusingly versatile term..." including the direction of the wood cells (straight grain, spiral grain), surface appearance or figure, growth-ring placement (vertical grain), plane of the cut (end grain, quarter sawn, flat sawn, etc), rate of growth (narrow grain), relative cell size (open grain), and other ...


-2

The best charts I have found for both tapered and straight wood screws is at http://www.wlfuller.com/html/wood_screw_chart.html - the fuller company has been around forever and it shows with the customer service and the accuracy of the advice.


0

They sell spray-on-rubber-in-a-can now: Check that it adheres to wood first, but if it's primed properly, it should.


2

If you have a limited amount of woodworking tools you could use molding. It will cover the seams. Use an "external corner" molding. You can cut it with almost any wood saw. It is usually available in several species of wood. It will stain, paint or finish like the panels.


1

When the occasion arose and I did not have a table saw for repeated accurate cuts, I got a piece of 3/4" plywood, in your case maybe a 2'X3' piece would do, plunge the blade of a circular saw through the plywood or better yet cut a 1"X6" hole in the middle of the plywood to set a circular saw blade through. Using fender washers and screws, clamp the saw to ...


3

Your circular saw should be able to cut the 45 degree angle, there should be a lever to allow you to tilt the plate thus tilting the bade. Something like this Then to get a Straight cut you need a guide along one edge. You need something longer than the piece you are cutting and wide enough to clamp it to it and have enough room to run the saw along the ...


0

Moving the legs, cutting it once and creating a drop-leaf at one end might be easier. But to be honest, I can't think of many situations where selling one table and buying another is not a more practical solution for a person wondering if converting a table is possible. I would consider the conversion moderately difficult. Furniture making requires a high ...


0

The 3 point jig described above is the best strategy, yet must be applied with consideration of several ratio issues: The drill bit selected should be as straight as possible and the tip very accurately on center; verify before using. The distance between the 2 end drill guides should be over twice the intended drill hole depth, as measured from only one ...


4

It is possible. Making good cuts is going to be the trickiest part. If you have a large table saw that can accommodate the table top that will give you the best results. Otherwise you can use a straight edge with a sharp, fine toothed blade in a circular saw. Use painter's tape over where you are going to cut. Mark the line then score the line a couple of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included