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0

Those gaps are never to be filled. The seasonal movement of wood will squeeze the putty back out of the gaps. Next heating cycle, the flooring will shrink again and will show the gaps again, looking something like the ragged edges your pictures show. Somebody tried filling the gaps already.... at least that one....


1

Painter's putty would work, but I don't know if it'd be your best option. First of all you'd need a ton of it to fill between every piece of flooring. Also, unless your going to use it after you put the finish on your floor, I'm not sure that the stain or lacquer wouldn't dissolve the putty. Unfortunately, I don't know what would be your best option, but I ...


3

Many solid wood doors are not "solid wood" in the usual sense - they are "Solid particle board" with wood veneer skins. That will not look good when routed. Clear, in focus pictures of the edges and ends would help in diagnosing this .vs. "solid wood, as in a plank, that came from a tree"


2

The first part of your question was addressed well over on woodworking.SE, at this link. For the second part, there are a few reasons that I might not want to do a decorative detail on a piece of wood- 1. The wood and/or project isn't worth the effort, 2. The wood is hard on tools, or 3. The wood is hard on the wood worker. Routing decorative detail can be ...


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They don't actually look that bad (at least to me from that picture) - you should be able to just sand them down, re-stain if desired, and then polyurethane / seal them again.


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I'm dealing with the same issue on my kitchen table. The best thing I've found to be the option for good results is 91% alcohol (Walmart brand) and a scraper. I've poured it on, let it sit then scrape. I really don't think I'm going to need to do too much sanding before coating it again with some type of sealant.


1

I ended up hiring a professional repair person who works for Steinway to make the repair. He used a polyester filler. The results are very good but not perfect. I will post a picture soon.


-1

We use it on actual tow behind trailer decks, it needs done once a year but prolongs the life of the treated wood that's on there.


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Pick up any Dwell issue and you will see plywood floors all over the place. No real cons other than style taste but realize you still need to 'finish' the floor by proper sanding, nail/screw setting and finish. One potential con is that you can't resand and refinish plywood floors more than once or twice. The top layer is just not thick enough.


1

How many? A regular hand saw will do the job nicely if you don't need 30 of the things. Do two straight cuts, a couple diagonals, and a little work with a wood chisel to finish off the bottom.


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I am sure you can do a partial depth cut with a jigsaw. I have done the same in a 4" thick wood piece, when the cutting depth of the blade was only 3-4/9". There was no problem of the saw "jumping up", as opposed to what the other responders have mentioned. The quality of cut was also O.K. (it depends upon the blade you use). I recommend Bosch T744D blade ...


0

Nailguns are generally used on plywood by people who need to set thousands of nails. When you are doing a small project, a hammer is a better idea. On good quality stairs, oak is used for the treads, one of the reasons being that it does not split readily. Also, good quality treads are tennoned into the risers, front and back, which binds them and prevents ...


-1

No. Sanding with progressively rough to medium to fine sand paper. Wipe down dry to remove all dust before applying polyurethane, paint, etc.


-1

Yes...drill a pilot hole. Tiny drill bit.


2

Predrill, and also probably use a hammer, not a nailgun, for this piece.


1

The finish will be almost impossible to match entirely, but if the damage is just skin deep (like a horridly bad scratch) and didn't hurt the structure or internals, you could remove anything proud of the surface . Fill the gouge with filler then sand, prime and paint. It would look better from afar, but you'd still see it in person from a few feet away. ...


4

Assuming the purported professionals were actually insured, you find the local piano shop (if one currently in production, ideally the shop dealing in that brand) and inquire about having it fixed, on the movers (or the movers' insurance's) dime. If it needs to move to get fixed, use Piano Movers.


1

Take a look at this calculator. You are correct in looking for beam deflection but the details matter for accuracy. http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator.htm Using Red Maple as the wood type with your measurements above the calculator estimates a .1" deflection with a 40 pound per foot uniform load.


2

It will depend on your book load, and whether your "hard maple" is really sugar maple or not. There is, of course, an easy way to deal with the calculations these days. Do be sure to read all the "notes" below the calculator. Shelf thickness (or "depth" in beam speak) cubed is indeed the correct factor, and why even small changes in thickness make large ...



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