New answers tagged

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i think the easiest way to do what you want is twofold. first, apply the coating with a spray gun, second, change to a lacquer clearcoat. this is pretty standard for all furniture and casework. lacquer goes on really thin and dries really fast. then sand it with 400 grit. reapply as necessary and repeat until you get the build thickness you desire. ...


1

Preventing runs is as easy as following one simple approach: Start heavy, finish light. What that means is that you immerse your brush to maybe inch of depth, scrape off one side on the can, and apply the remaining product load to the project in a new area adjacent to the previous work. The idea of "starting heavy" is that you apply enough product to ...


4

A handsaw, a square, and practice. While it seems common for folks starting out to reject this option, (practice seems to be out of style) it works. But you need to accept the idea that you'll actually have to make some practice cuts and get in the habit of noticing how the saw is cutting and learn to keep it on track. A mitre box. You can make one from ...


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From the comments and a posted answer, what I understand is this - re-drilling one of the holes is the only option. The [E] seems to be a better option to do that than the angled [F]. That's what we'll try. Thanks for some ideas.


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If one side lined up and the other did not, one of the holes that do not line up should corrected (obviously). To determine which one, place a bolt in one of the holes, like you have already have done in the picture, meaning the bottom hole and set the chair on the floor without the second bolt. First look at the chair determining if the angles are the same ...


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The wedge being ripped off is 86" long and has a slope of 0.25", right? If so then, the answer is 0.167° based on this online calculator. By the way, the law of sines means, look it up in a table or use a calculator. The tangent (to look up) equals the opposite divided by the adjacent... so get a trig book and look up the angle of a tangent for 0.25/86 ...


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Since it seems like you're working with an existing space these work wonders if you're looking for an angle... but you're not, you're looking for an edge length. What actually needs is a straight ruler. Place it on the edge of the 2x4 and rotate to 2", mark it off, and cut, followed by putting it in place, marking off the end edge and using the ruler and ...


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If I understand correctly, you have a triangle with one side of 2" and another side of 1.75". The first thing you want to do is find the hypotenuse. Use the Pythagorean theorem. a^2 + b^2 = c^2 2^2 + 1.75^2 = c^2 4 + 3.0625 = c^2 sqrt(7.0625) = c 2.65 = c Next we will use arcsin or arccos to find the angles. Make sure your calculator is set to degrees, ...


0

Cover the entry with a roof, awning, etc. Wait until the door is dry and seal it with many layers of Tung oil, shellac, Varathane, or even a high quality paint (epoxy? or oil based paint) If the door opens inward, add an exterior water resistant door like a conventional screen door but which has windows in areas where the water strikes.


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You might consider replacing the wooden door with a fiberglass one. Metal would avoid the swelling issue, but likely suffer from rust/oxidation due to the wet environment.


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I would install an awning or porch roof extension out 3 feet from the building wall line to protect the door. They even make fabric type awnings that can roll up against the wall during nice weather times.


5

I am going to guess that you have a wood door causing the problem. If you have checked the original installation and frame alignment and feel that cannot be changed, then the only real solution is to plane it down so it closes properly when damp or humid. You can install extra or new weatherstripping to assure it has a good airtight seal,especially in dryer ...


2

It's book-matched panels. I can't tell from the photo whether it's veneer, plywood, or hardwood. Looks like kinda like european walnut, not pine/plywood... but without a closer look at the edges, I really couldn't say. As far as affordable options...


4

Those are match grain veneer panels. They are usually made by attaching selected hardwood veneers to plywood using contact glues. Veneers can be purchased from specialty woodworking dealers. The technique is not hard but requires some care (and practice) to get straight, bubble-free surfaces.


0

It would be helpful if you could add a picture of your desk to your question. The commenters are correct. A work table with 2x4 legs is probably not fancy, and doesn't need a fancy job to raise it. If it were my project, I would either replace the legs with longer ones, or add a 5-1/2" stub under the leg while scabbing a full length 2x4 leg to the inside of ...


1

How many dB of isolation are you looking for? The ideal would be to isolate the inside and outside from each other, which means offset studs and joists. The walls and floor could be filled with sand to achieve further isolation, if your building structure will handle the weight.... websearch home recording studios, many if the solutions for those would ...


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Offgassing has never really been a concern with treated lumber. Direct skin contact and ingestion were concerns with CCA treatment, and to a lesser degree with the products that have replaced it. As long as you're not spending a lot of time in contact with wet wood, and as long as your pets and family members aren't gnawing on it, I wouldn't be concerned.


2

The picture that you show is indicating some type of fastener to hold the wood to the brick. That is not really a tool. A tool may very well have been used to install the fastener in the first place. It is difficult to discern the type of fastener that was used from your picture. A close up of the fastener would help but from zooming into your picture it ...


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Oxalic acid will remove the stain. Here is a link to the product. It is for showing you the container. It has very easy to use instructions on the container


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It may be very difficult to remove this. Wood and water are generally not good companions. On top of that oak is a very porous wood and the water and accompanying discoloration that it leaves behind may very well have penetrated down into the wood more than can be removed by a light sanding. Note that staining like this very often happens at the boundary of ...


1

You say it's an old house. I suppose that if the siding was practically at the end of it's rope, plastering it with wood filler might extend its life a few years. I helped replace the siding on an old barn once that was practically plastered with putty. I don't know how long that treatment lasted; I only saw the final/end result (zillions of chunks of putty ...


2

I use a heat gun rather than chemical strippers. It's easier and usually all old paint can be scraped off. Heat guns do have their own set of special considerations and safety precautions but overall it is a better way IMO. That being said, even if you remove all the old paint it is common to be left with a surface far from perfect. I use exterior grade ...


2

I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


1

Wow that was a long question! First welcome to the stack exchange , now to try to answer your questions. First if you want to spend just a little $ and do trim and framing Don't get a jig saw! Your cuts will not be square. A chop saw that can tilt can be purchased for a few more $ and it can cut square 2x4's and miter cuts. Chop saws cannot rip lumber and I ...



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