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1

Gauge is the thickness of the drive tangs on the saw chain. It must match the groove width on the bar. Pitch is the length of the links that make up the chain, basically the distance spanned by three rivets divided by 2 and must match the sprocket pitch so the chain is properly driven. The reason for measuring over the span of three rivets and taking ...


1

Presumably the new bar is either longer or wider or both than the old bar? Number of links is to fit the bar - pitch is to fit the sprocket.


3

Matching stain is very difficult. Seriously, I heard of one guy who markets himself as the "Wood Whisperer". When guys start calling themselves a wood whisperer, you know you are getting into the black arts. Typically the average floor installer will use a wood wheel from his manufacturer and pray. That said, you will not know how good the match is until ...


1

Agree with diceless that a floating engineered wooden floor is more normal over a concrete slab. Thermal movement in fully fixed wooden floors causes problematical expansion/contraction more often than not. Even using stable wood, the humidity in the room will change season to season, as will the temperature of the underlying/surrounding structure, all can ...


4

You're cutting a mortise. The classic method is to drill a succession of overlapping holes, using a bit that's approximately the width of your desired mortise. You then clean it up/square it up with a (SHARP!) wood chisel. Youtube it and you can see it being done. I would advise you one small thing: I wouldn't run a mortise and tenon joint through the ...


1

Two part polyurethane is the way to go, Its food safe when hard, and the active hardener makes a really good hard surface. I also like the finish that these products add to the surface, and you typically could add about three layers to make it really bullet-proof. The stuff is a little bit expensive, but well worth the money!.


0

I've taken a utility knife and cut out the old (bubbled up) section, sanded and repaired it with just joint compound. It took a few coats but after the primer and 2 coats of paint, they all look just like new.


2

To calculate the max load, you need to check the capacity of each piece and identify which one will fail first, in other words whatever has the lowest capacity is your max capacity. In some cases, you'll have load spread across multiple pieces, e.g. each of the decking boards will carry some of the load for the shelf and send half, give or take, to each ...


2

I would not use a bolt for this, although you can. There are various ways to do this. The simplest just requires a rod and two push caps. Drill a hole through the wood and sand it with a fine circular file to fit a rod. Cut the rod to size using (for example) a cutoff disk. Get two push caps and use them to secure the rod/axle. Push caps look like this and ...


0

If the cracks are large, a catalyzed filler (like car body bondo) often works well. I think "wood epoxy" is essentially the same product, except that it's tinted grey instead of pink, which may make it easier to stain to the desired hue.


2

Good for you for tackling this project. If you're an amateur and this is your first project, then don't try to be perfect because you will be beating yourself up for no reason. If you are going to paint the finished project, then the looks don't matter so much. You can buy wood filler that will fill any gaps and grain. Force it into any gaps or cracks ...


2

It doesn't matter unless the room is going to have an extreme amount of humidity, temperature changes, or was subject to a lot of chemicals. What you are worried about with a ledger is warping or the bolts rusting. If I wanted to protect a piece of wood from elements I would use an oil based primer and paint as I would use in a bathroom.


5

A true wood stain does not build a "film" on the surface. It only changes the color of the porous wood fiber near the surface. You will want a film-forming finish if your goal is to make it easier to clean up spilled liquids. A paint will do this, but if you want to preserve the look of the wood, then 1 to 3 coats of a polyurethane based finish will also ...


1

Stain or paint - whatever suits your fancy, or colour scheme. :)


0

First we don't really know if this wall is load bearing or not. If the house was built in the US 50 years ago and it is a basement with poured concrete then the chances of having a wooden fabricated load bearing wall are slim - it happens but not very likely. Second all you have to do to answer your question - if it is a load bearing wall - is look above ...


3

If trimming a small amount 1/8" - 1/4" off a stud in a load bearing wall is the ONLY option, then I would do that PLUS install another stud directly beside the cut one, and fasten them together -- this is called "sistering". Good luck! :)


0

It depends how wide the studs themselves are. Is it a pre-built cabinet? A better approach, if feasible would be to adapt the cabinet itself. Trying to trim wall studs is tricky unless you're making only the smallest of cuts.


2

If there is a "ReStore" or other building salvage store in your town, you may be able to find some original vintage trim options there. For example, in Seattle, Washington, USA, there are several: Earthwise, Ballard ReUse, and SecondUse. They've been invaluable to pick up parts to fix up my 100+ year old house. It can be hard to find exactly what you need ...



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