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0

I did the same thing. I had to start over. But only in the small area that had the drip. I am redoing my kitchen cabinets, and while putting the glaze on the doors some dripped and got on the other side of the door, did not notice it until it had dried. So on the small area I repainted and then glazed. Can't even tell it happened.I was using The Rust-Oleum ...


0

According to this article, you should not paint shingles. Instead you can stain them and preserve them with oil preservatives.


6

Cedar shingles do not need paint. Without paint, they last a very long time with almost no maintenance. As soon as you paint them, you are climbing on a maintenance treadmill of having to scrape and repaint them that you'd avoid by letting them attain a natural brown where dry, gray where wet appearance as they weather. If you have issues with the natural ...


0

Option 1 A less expensive option if you don't mind having a plate behind the refrigerator is to put a 3 gang blank plate over the existing 3 gang switch box. Then feed out of it with the necessary wires to the other side. The electrical is pretty basic as all you would be doing is extending the switch loops/legs to the new 3 gang box. You do not ...


4

I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


0

Obviously depends on the type of wood (of the dowel), is the dowel in single shear or double shear, can the base wood handle the load on the dowel or will it split or deform, what is the load going through the joint, etc. wood properties http://www.awc.org/pdf/wsdd/C1.pdf american wood council pdf contains detailed formulas for calculating dowel size. ...


1

To fix the damage, you would need to sand down the entire table evenly to prevent creating dips in certain areas from over sanding in one area. I would suggest starting with an electric palm sander with 40 or 50 grit paper and sand the entire surface until the damage is removed. The table looks like it will be thick enough to do that. If you aren't ...


3

This table top can be sanded down to fresh wood surface to accept a new finish. That is unless the burn mark is quite deep. Sanding out a deep burn mark could end up leaving a depression in that part of the table surface unless you would aggressively sand most the rest of the surface the same amount. Refinishing to still show the wood grain as present ...


0

You do not need water proofing in between the ledger and the rim joist, but the joint needs protected some how. Flashing, roofing membrane, etc. And what ever it is needs to go under the siding and over the ledger in a continuous fashion with no seams at the ledger. Tar paper is not enough. Metal, EPDM, etc is what is needed.


1

Marek's answer is what I'd expect to do. Thin In order to make the result a lot thinner than 10cm, what you can do is to use thinner support wood on the walls. Since the load is vertical you don't need substantial lumber there. I would also look into reducing the thickness of your pallet wood - you are only interested in the surface appearance and it ...


3

LVL is laminated veneer lumber. The numbers 1.9 and 2.0 refer to the Modulus of Elasticity which is a measure of the stiffness of the beam. I would seriously doubt that there is any meaningful difference between 1.9 and 2.0 rated beams.


0

I was very successful with simply cutting a notch in a 1x6. This notch would be for the pallet planks on the bottom side of your pallet so make sure it's big enough to span the largest width plank. Then I would take this 1x6 and set it in between the planks and next to the "2x4" that all the planks are nailed to. This would raise the pallet off the ground +- ...


0

Obviously you can use specialized equipment like Dan Padilla suggests, but I will assume you don't have such equipment. You need to lever across both sides of the nail which is hard to do with a hammer. Use a nail puller and wedge it into the crack where the plank is nailed to the joist. If that isn't working for you, get a hacksaw and cut in the seam ...


-2

Use 2 strong planks + 2 strong supporting planks like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWnj4fUhyjI


1

Your question is concerning two things: 1. Proper fitting (wood planks to masonry wall). 2. Proper wood treatment (anti-moisture). So that's how will my answer look like. Let's look at this. 1. Proper fitting. I would advise preparing additional support planks going vertically with - say - 1 meter space (that spacing requires additional insight on how ...


0

If conditions are hot and dry, my experience is 24 hours is plenty. As long as it is dry to the touch you should be ok. A quick note on the stain itself. Two years ago I discovered Behr Deckover. This product is more expensive than traditional stains and goes on thick. However, after two years not a crack or blemish. Looks like it was just applied. ...


2

White or yellow PVA (Poly Vinyl Acetate) wood glue (elmers/titebond) and some new wood. Gluing in a few toothpicks is one method; drilling out the hole and gluing in a section of dowel is another.


0

You want gel stripper. The gel will allow you to apply the stripper to the inverted and vertical surfaces (it will still drip, put something down on the floor). Use several coats of stripper with a scraper until the wood starts to lighten a bit. At that point you can either be happy and/or re-stain the wood. If you want to get it back to the base wood ...


1

That wire wheel might help if there are nooks and crannys, like fine detail. But I am afraid what you will need is a lot of elbow grease and sandpaper. Starting with coarse and working down to fine, using steel wool and/or wire bushes for the detail work. Good quality chemical strippers are helpful if you are able to cope with the mess/smell/health hazards. ...


1

Most oil-based deck stains need at least 24 hours of dry time. High humidity and/or low temperatures will increase that time, so will over-applying the stain. I would not apply it unless I was fairly confident that I had at least 48 hours with no rain. Better to wait.


2

Pre-drilling is not just about wood-splitting. It fundamentally changes the nature of the joint. Take the example of screwing decking to joists. If you were to pre-drill the deck board so the hole was WIDER than the screw but the screw is allowed to bite into the joist. The joint becomes much like a nut-and-bolt where the entire joint is held in place by ...


1

The reason the hole is drilled is to remove excess material so that when the screw bites in, it does not rip the wood (or whatever) apart. It's simple physics. When the screw does in, if there is no hole, then the wood volume occupied by the shank of the screw is displaced. Where do you think that wood goes? Outer space? Forcing screws into wood using an ...


8

If the wood is prone to splitting, it'll still split when you don't drill pilot holes, impact drill or not.


1

If those refinished stair treads are a common type type of hardwood such as oak, maple or beech you can get 1/4 inch thick plywood with an hardwood veneer on one or both sides. Looks like one sheet of the material would be more than enough to to make your riser skins. Precut the pieces to fit without fastening right away. When you cut them you will want ...



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