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1

If that is what you would like for your floor material than you should install wood flooring. Depending on what type of flooring will determine its longevity and maintenance schedule. Solid wood strips 3/4" thick will need to be sealed with a urethane type coating in several built up applications and then occasionally resealed. Wood laminate can be installed ...


1

TL:DR - It can be done, but requires extra attention and caution I grew up in a house that had hardwood in pretty much every room except the basement. Hardwood is more tolerable in places like a "powder room" or half-bath, since you don't get the additional exposure to moisture associated with a shower or similar. Even well sealed, manufactured, hardwood, ...


-1

If you saw swarming termites in your house two years ago, I hope you had you house treated. If not, they have your home as the food menu.


1

I recommend the following procedure after cutting treated wood: Cut several pieces of untreated wood. Clean the blade and surrounding with a cloth with little synthetic oil on it. Repeat this procedure several times always using a clean fresh cloth. Here's why I recommend this: It is difficult to reach every point of your saw blade when just cleaning it ...


0

What is going to happen is the wood grain will be "raised". All this means is the fibers that make up that particular section of wood that got wet will swell from re-hydrating. If you happen to be in the sanding stage of your project you will be relieved to know that many woodworkers purposely moisten their unfinished wood. When the wood dries the grain is ...


1

Unfortunataly there's very little to do but wait and see. Whether it warps or discolors or both will be revealed in the next 2 or three days.


1

Word of advice, do not sand the door anymore than what has occured already. You can see how there are a few lighter areas where some dings are that the "patina" has been removed by something. Sanding will ruin the patina, making the door look blotchy as well. On old furniture and doors where the cracks are not structural, burn in sticks are what I use. They ...


0

The cracks look pretty straight, so I would try to cut a thin sliver of wood, glue and wedge it in. A table saw is the easiest approach to this task. You are cutting a very thin piece that may tend to fly off the table, so be sure to wear safety glasses and stand slightly to the side, away from the strip about to be freed. The wood looks like oak. If there ...


0

Nice door - good work on the restoration! First I'd try to remove as much of the paint as possible. A putty knife and razor blade will probably help. Then the best filler would be a medium-brown tinted epoxy that matches the color of the stain you'll be applying. If that's not available, a stainable wood filler should be used.


0

Get the dimensions you need first, then judge by looks. My guess is that the roofing boards would be lower grade (ie, more knotty) than floor boards.


3

The point of the dowelled/drawbored mortise-tenon joint is not to line up the to parts, but to create a tension that draws the tenon tightly into the mortise. Therefore, rather than drilling though the mortise and tenon together, the drilling process is divided into three steps: Drill trough the mortise alone. Insert the tenon, and use the drill to mark ...


0

Apply another coat of the stain, let it sit for a little while--not long and certainly not until it "dries"--then wipe away all of the excess. The new stain should dissolve the excess, gummy "old" stain and it should all come up clean. Fingers crossed.


1

Just build the platform as Chris Duffin did, make sure it is low enough so your auto's undercarriage will clear, and leave a couple channels/slots for your auto to pass through. You could make hinged lids that fold back down when the car is gone, giving you a continuous level platform surface. Keep it simple.


-2

I have been thinking about building a steam box. I figured I would pick up a couple stainless TIG welding electrodes at the local welding shop and bend them into a serpentine shape with about a half inch gap between them that would fit in the bottom of a 5 gallon paint bucket. Make some spacers out of plexiglass so the two electrodes are spaced away from ...


0

If you were using a combined stain/varnish (likely with the Minwax brand), it was probably outdated. They can expire. Removing it's going to be essentially a matter of stripping the wood bare and starting again. If you were using a real stain, they normally aren't applied like paint -- they're flooded onto a surface, allowed to sit a bit to soak in, and the ...


3

Are you looking for a desk grommet? I would recommend getting the trim piece prior to making the hole, as your size options will not be unlimited.


1

First, this doesn't look like like solid wood flooring. At best, this is an engineering wood flooring (plywood). Mostly likely, since there are 3 boards to a plank, this is a laminate floor. Second, the finish, in general, is in really bad shape. Any type of spot refinishing is just going to stick out, maybe as bad as the damage you are trying to cover. ...


0

My dad & I installed Hardwood while I was a teenager. We worked with another guy to finish it. He would get a putty and go over the whole floor with it. I would say with those gouges you can try to sand out the dark outlines and fill with some putty. Their odd shape and form will make them stand out a bit but it's better than paint. If you get a putty to ...


0

it may sound crazy but if never done before, take pic , pull it up & flip boards. choose any color you like, lightly sand, stain, put wood back ( remember to stager boards & keep same gap as original ) lightly sand ( i prefer fine steel wool. ) mysel, a friend works in graphics industry, designed & produced .a large HARLEY DAVIDSON BAR ...


3

Unless you stain or paint the fence, you will see the joint no matter what since the grain will not line up. For this type of project I would recommend using a scarf joint. This provides a much stronger connection than a simple butt joint. You get an increased glue area and the fastener geometry combined with the scarf will prevent the two pieces from ...


1

Drill holes in both and connect with dowels.


2

You would need to patch it with small blocks of wood called a dutchman. Cut a block of wood to roughly the same size and shape of the hole. Make sure it is slightly over sized. Then hold the block up to the hole and trace around it. After this is done, use a chisel and carefully chip out the hole to match the size of the wood patch. Don't cut through ...


2

68.57 Pounds per square foot if evenly distributed - call it 70 (or 75) and pull up a calculator (or drop by your lumberyard and have them run it on their I-joist software, which might well be the most affordable solution.) Or hire an engineer. Underbuilt haylofts do have a tendency to demonstrate that they are underbuilt; so don't underbuild it.


1

I'm not sure if there is wood grain texture to the board or not. I actually patched a hole in my front door (painted white) by using Plastiwood and then taking an awl and mimicking the texture before repainting. It turned out incredible. Updated with photo: I got a little carried away with too much texture, but keep in mind that this is a closeup. Most ...


0

As Derrik mentioned, the Sagulator is probably your best bet. The topic has been covered fairly well in the woodworking stack exchange. The Sagulator is designed for static loads, e.g. shelves, whereas chairs are going to be taking dynamic loads, but the relative strengths should still apply: if you put in your yellow pine vs red oak, the ratios should apply ...



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