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1

Sure it's heavy, but it's also stiff, unless it's in terrible condition. You say 4' x 18" - if a typical bowling alley lane (even a "used up" one) it's also 2-1/2" - 4" thick - isn't it? Solid maple, nailed and/or glued up from 3/4" x 4" strips on edge, typically; then sanded down for resurfacing until it's too thin or the business goes out of business. In ...


2

If the sap is really hard, you should be able to knock it off with a quick swipe with a scraper. The finish underneath might be compromised, though. If its still a bit gooey, you might try hitting it with a spurt of compressed air from a can to cool it down.


0

Using the Sagulator, you're borderline for a noticeable sag... It will also depend on how deep your shelves are, and how wide the aquarium is (I assumed 16 inches deep shelves). Since you're using plywood you're going to be facing the shelves with something, right? I would just double up that shelf (two layers of plywood glued together) and you should be ...


0

You can use a router or a dado blade in your table saw, or a surface plane to trim the bottom of the posts.


0

You will not have problems mounting the TV if it is under 150 lbs and into 2 or more studs. Use proper screws and mounting system/plates.


0

Do not go with a wood base! You will regret it. A wood base will hold germs and bacteria, and will rot away after so many washes and bird droppings. Always try go with a solid concrete base for birds if possible, or a good solid slab base. You must also be careful of critters digging under and getting through. Ideally you want concrete base, nothing else. ...


0

Those butcher block tops are often poly because it is nice and shiny, but could be oil and wax because it is much more practical. Either way, sanding those stains is not trivial - it takes a while. But you need to at least get the finish, whatever it is, off the stain before bleaching or sanding or staining the blemish itself. Be sure you have the correct ...


3

Pine comes to mind immediately. Most big box home centers will carry a selection of 1"x pine- that is perfect for shelving. Another option would be poplar, though it's a bit more expensive (generally). Any softwood would do, but those two are the most common.


0

Use the angle on this tool to get your cutting edge into the glue between the two pieces of wood and cut through as much glue as possible, then pry the door open once you have most of the glue removed. Remove the rest of the wood from both surfaces with sand paper then reseal the wood.


0

Heating a pot thru a sheet of paper works perfectly well as long as you stay below the paper's flash point. This is actually useful when making jam or similar sticky foods, or when you want to use a cast-iron pot but are afraid it will scratch the surface. The classic demo is boiling water, for the same reasons you can boil water in a paper cup. But paper ...


0

Trus-Joist Corporation has an informative .pdf that addresses some of these problems. It's here: www.woodbywy.com/document/tb-821/ (I found this link by Googling the phrase 'I-joists as wall studs'.) One of the main problems I noticed in the document is securely attaching the studs to the floor. What they describe is to add stiffeners to the OSB web at the ...


0

You can use "furniture glaze" (pretty much a tinted "clear" finish.) You could tint/dye a clear finish, or use a naturally tinted "clear" finish such as dark shellac. For both of those you'd likely need to at least scuff-sand the current finish to get good adhesion. You can also use a colored/tinted furniture wax over the current finish.


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In my own personal experience of this, the floor is capable of enormous movement, even if you undercut at the skirtings. Avoid long, expanses without expansion joints if possible. My floor used to rise, like a small hill, then open into canyons, dependent on the change in the weather and humidity. Remember too, being on edge, it's strong enough to push a ...


-1

The existing finish (shellac, linseed oil etc) may be affected by your cleaning solution. Consider using Acrylic finishes, as they, being water based, are less likely to be affected by spirit based cleaning products...


0

After attempting every known thing at the time, I was faced with removing a thick layer of sticky varnish like finish from my doors,(thick & dark), wanting to restore them to natural pine. Good old 'Sugar Soap' was the only thing to remove it, then a wash down. Brilliant finish to take new sealant too! When restoring antique furniture, I often used a ...


0

I would install a ledger on all wall areas and the free floating corner I would rabbit out under side of countertop, and wall area to install a heavy L bracket then mud the bracket on wall if need be.


1

Some fences are never stained. Keep in mind that sunlight will "bleach" wood that is not protected from UV light. So, you can leave the fence as-is but it might significantly weather with no protection, depending on whether the pressure washing damages whatever existing finish is on it now. Also, you don't necessarily want it to be hot when applying an ...


0

Is it possible to bolt a steel angle to the concrete with a short leg under the overhanging plate to support it? Difficult to diagnose without seeing and of course bolting a steel might look a 'pigs ear' depending on where it is and what the options are to 'hide' the steel. This is of course assuming that you don't want to shutter up and pour new concrete ...


1

Sometimes concrete just doesn't cooperate. I'd say up to an inch out of play is the carpenter's job to deal with. Two and a half inches! is possibly a problem for lawyers... Had the distance been fudged to one and a quarter inches on both sides, (harrumph) maybe that'd be OK... I'd be interested in what the permissible 'fudge factor' for sill plates ...


2

I would be concerned. Have the general contractor figure out who is out of specification and have them fix it. (My guess is that the concrete is to blame, but I'm not there with a measuring tape.) I strongly suggest that you don't let the house be built out of square. Among other things, it'll cost a bit more at just about every step.


1

2x6 DF #2 Supported o the ends can handle about 11 lb. per Ln. Ft. total load. This would include snow. would recommend at least 2x8 if you are okay with sagging from wood creep after many years. 4x8, (2) 2x8, or 2x10 would be better.


0

You can, but much of any load on it (plants, crossbars, etc. for a typical pergola) will probably break it.


1

One possibility would be to get a piece of quarter-round and glue or otherwise affix it to the edges of a flat-sided piece of wood matching the non-rounded dimensions that you need. The corners will need to be dealt with, and could be cut with a lot of work with a random orbital sander. Another option is to shape the quarter-round by hand as suggested ...


3

I would expect that most retail outlets do not offer to run wood through a shaper or do router work. What you really want to look for is a crafts-person that has the tools to do this for you. If your intent is to avoid having to pay someone to do a project like this then take the opportunity to figure out how you can do it yourself. There are a number of ...


0

Don't know where you are, but in my area, the wood from big box stores is extremely variable. Finding a specialty supplier will probably yield better results. To answer your questions: Wood that hasn't been dried much will probably twist and turn more than wood that has dried. That said, wood commercially dried will frequently be twisted by the time it ...



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