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Leave the door open to reduce humidity, better yet: knock out the hinge pins, pull the door and lay the door flat on some sawhorses and give it a good glossy paint job paying special attention to the top and bottom edges.


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If you're joining two pieces of wood along the length of the grain, the glue bond can be stronger than the wood itself. Butt joints are the exact opposite. If you need to join two grain ends, you'll want to reinforce it with biscuits or dowels (or possibly something even fancier like dovetails). Without knowing what you're attempting to make, my suggestion ...


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No UC code could mean two things: either it was ripped off on purpose, or by accident, or its UC code is so low it doesn't rate to be classified (garbage). UC codes are "usage categories", running from UC1 (the lowest) to UC5 (the highest). But the UC code is only half of it. A UC code must be matched to the retention rating of the chemical injected into ...


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The right way: buy a bigger piece of wood. For very limited, low-stress uses, the biscuit joiner as mentioned by @Nathan might work well enough - as might a Tongue and groove joint, double-groove and spline joint, or lap joint. While a scarf joint (various types are available) is strong, with such short pieces of wood you probably don't have enough wood in ...


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Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


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At that length and with a decent thickness (>=1 1/2") you'd probably be fine just using a solid wood plank as long as the species is appropriate. Here's a chart of the modulus of elasticity for some common woods http://www.woodworkweb.com/woodwork-topics/wood/146-wood-strengths.html To be honest, when designing something like a staircase you should really ...


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I've used the steel wool + vinegar method before*. It's essentially a stain so really only affects the surface layer. It shouldn't have any meaningful affect on the strength of the piece of wood. Splitting and warping is related to moisture and drying so wouldn't really be affecting by weathering stain. After you weather it, note that most any additional ...


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The purpose of the solvent is to not remove but redistribute the stain that is already applied, although it will remove some of it. It will not remove what has penetrated into the grain of the wood, but it will lighten it. The solvent may even push it deeper into the grain, and that is ok too. You can sand your project at this point, the scratches will ...


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Top, then bottom, then top, then bottom will greatly reduce the odds of the board warping due to differential moisture uptake/release when one surface is sealed and the other is open to the air. While the acrylic paint is sealing it somewhat, the conventional wisdom of long experience is to try and keep the number of coats per side the same to prevent (or at ...


5

Doesn't make any difference, really; the question is number of coats per surface, not order they're applied in. The thing to watch out for is that there will be a tendency for drips to run down the edges and onto the other face. You may want to use masking tape or other techniques to guard against that, though going with multiple thin coats rather than ...


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I know this is way after the fact but if you want to brown up wood a cool method is to use Potasium Dichromate (Bichromate of Potash if your an old timey cabinet maker). Its a water soluble mineral that reacts with the tannin in the wood and accelerates the natural aging process. It won't eliminate the red completely but it makes it more of a brown tone and ...


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If you're feeling adventurous you could try spraying on a tinted top coat, that way you could achieve the ebony(ish) color and preserve the grain pattern. Its a tricky technique and it must be sprayed but it can be done. There are a few variations but in general you add 10-20% dye stain to a finish like urethane or lacquer and spray on enough coats to get ...


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Seeing how it isn't real wood, rather just a thin laminate on top of MDF, I wouldn't bother trying to stain it and instead would just paint it. Painting it shouldn't be any different than painting anything else really - lightly sand, prime and paint! Depending on the color and type of paint, you might need two or more coats. If you haven't yet assembled ...


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These flying drill-bits are common in my area. Having a professional exterminator treat the fascia boards with insecticide every few years is effective and doesn't do huge amounts of harm to the environment. (I do know folks who have the exterminator on contract, covering this plus barrier spraying for ants plus anything else that comes up. I haven't felt ...


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Since you say the doors only stick in the winter, that would lean more towards the humidity/temp changes you mention. As for the cracks, could be part of that, could be from just natural settling of the home over time. As to things to do about it, I'd just point you to an easily found article on the net where someone else has already gone through the ...


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I would recommend an oil based satin wipe-on poly. I like Watco. It will give you the same look as tung oil but give you better protection, easier clean up in the future, and on something like oak it will be easier to apply (oils tend to weep back out of the pores as they dry which you will have to wipe off several times). Wipe-ons are the same thing as ...


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First a disclaimer: You should follow all local by-laws and building codes in your area relating to mold mitigation/abatement to avoid lawsuits and painful death. Having said that, since your probably going to handle it yourself anyway, here's what to do. The top picture does look like classic black mold but the other two look like a factory sealant of some ...


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It's possible-but-unlikely that there's nothing on them. Most likely they were done with a penetrating oil finish, - tung, walnut or linseed oils, or in the most minimal, least-color-changing but non-hardening realm, mineral oil. You could use any of those (use BOILED linseed oil inside, or else that never hardens, either) again, though linseed and tung ...


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Yeah stain won't be enough to keep your wood sealed and healthy over the long term. You need something that's low in wax content (wax is what turns white when wet) and has a u.v. blocker. If its just a small project there's no shame in a rattle can spar varnish (Helmsman has one available at the box stores). Oils are okay if you want a dull rubbed finish and ...


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Yes you absolutely need to treat spruce and pine with something or they will weather and splinter ferociously. You've got two basic options 1: a protective finish such as a varnish or polyurethane or 2: a penetrative sealer like linsead oil, water sealer, etc. Both have merits and weaknesses but either properly applied will get the job done. More important ...


1

Congrats on your first project! I understand your concern. Stains don't offer wood protection so a top coat is advised especially if it is for an outdoor table. I used a spray once and was disappointed, so my background is with a can. But I would suggest a foam brush, they are cheap, can be tossed afterward and when applied correctly they don’t leave ...


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Lots of other good tips provided as answers so far, but the one thing no one has mentioned is that a drill is actually the wrong tool to use for driving screws. Sure, they work and lots of people use them, but the best tool to use would be an impact driver: An impact driver has much higher torque than a drill does, and rather than using a twisting motion ...


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Try replacing your loose screws with Torx head screws, which are much more resistant to stripping: By design, Torx head screws resist cam-out better than Phillips head or slot head screws. Where Phillips heads were designed to cause the driver to cam out, to prevent overtightening, Torx heads were designed to prevent cam-out. These screws are also ...


1

Some tips Use the correct sized bit for the screw head. This really makes a huge difference. Some bits are much more accurately made than others. Buy a new one. Lubricate the screw. I have a tin of automotive grease I use for this but I've read you should use petroleum jelly (e.g. Vaseline). This quick and easy to do, just dip the srew before inserting. ...


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From what you are describing you are using the wrong drill bit or not applying sufficient pressure. Make sure you have the right # drill bit for the screws. The wrong bit will strip the heads making it difficult to extract or to drive the screws further in. If you are using the right drill bit, stand directly over the screw and apply sufficient pressure ...


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I gave a lot of thought to this, having two young grandchildren. I was going to build a playset but now will just start with a zipline and slackline; which I have to build towers for, as I have no trees. Anyway, depending on the size you want there are some very economical plastic semi-spheres out there. I would not use any sort of wood for any of the ...


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There is no evidence that modern pressure treated wood presents any risk to children (after all, we're using the newer treatments instead of CCA precisely because of concerns about risks to children). The treatments use ingredients with low toxicity to humans, bind well to the wood, and are easily excreted (so they won't build up with continued exposure). ...


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The go-to materials for outdoor construction are cedar and pressure treated wood. Many prefer cedar, and most kits you see from big box stores and other sources use it. It is generally more expensive, but it is lighter and softer (for drilling and hammering). It will last for a number of years untreated, and even longer if it is pre-treated with penetrating ...


0

I just used a regular Pledge furniture oil spray, nothing special. It just wiped off nicely. Some of the color did come up but not much; it looks fine and feels clean. Try it in an inconspicuous place first, it worked great for me.


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As it appears the 'wobble' is between the metal leg, the metal bracket, and the bolts provided, I'd say this wobble is due to IKEA's ahem rather wide tolerance specifications. In other words, sometimes you just get wobble when it comes to IKEA products. :) I'd suggest using something to solidify the connection between the leg and the plates. JB Weld would ...


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FWIW, hot melt glue is very useful for this sort of thing. It's a slightly less permanent solution than JB Weld/epoxy. However, it also requires you work fast, so YMMV as they say :-)


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You can drill a hole and force fit a threaded bar into the slightly smaller hole to force a thread, however I would only recommend this option for hard woods, if you are using chip or even ply then I would not risk it. I see you ask about 20mm pipe, which would not have threaded inserts which you could use. The only warning I would have here is that you ...



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