New answers tagged

0

Probably best to call a skilled handyman who could remove/ replace the hinge jamb for you. Then the job would be done right and your worries would be assuaged.


1

Borax and Tea Tree Oil will kill mold and hinder the growth of mold, if not completely wiped from the area after cleaning. There are many methods for cleaning mold, but cleaners like Bleach or Ammonia only help clean off what is on the surface, they don't get deep into porous materials like wood or drywall, and they should be cleaned off after; so they ...


3

I wouldn't call that a joist, I'd call that a tie. A joist is something supporting a floor, designed to take vertical loads in bending. A tie is something designed to take tension loads, in this case that tie is there to stop the roof spreading sideways at its base. Now, just because it is a tie doesn't mean it can't also take some vertical load. In fact, ...


1

I'm sure you will be a lot happier sleeping on your home made design if you add some diagonal braces -- one across the back and one on each side. Professional furniture designers know how to construct strong joints using hard wood and proper brackets, but with the materials and techniques available to us amateurs it is wiser to overbuild a little.


0

Short answer: Put some splines in those corners! Based on the details of your situation, that is probably enough. Long answer: Wood movement can be a problem for frame miters because the boards will get wider and narrower with humidity changes. This means the 45 degree miters will try to stretch themselves to be slightly different angles. Here's what I ...


0

Ok, so you need easy finishing options: Let's start with wax since you mentioned that. Paste wax is probably the easiest option, although many waxes and wax/oil blends will work. You could also try beeswax, butcher's block wax, or even paraffin. For any wax that's too firm, try mixing with mineral spirits or mineral oil and applying some elbow grease. Wax ...


-1

It is not much more work nor much more expensive to purchase a new door w/door knob hole and the hinge reliefs routed. If your measurements are accurate and precise, and the fabrication of the new door is true to the demensions of the existing door, maybe $45 for the cheapest hollow door to $175 for a solid wood one, and all hinges are prwciarly set so that ...


2

It looks like it will press right back into place, so it really comes down to what type of glue to use, and how to clamp. Here's what I would do: Choose a glue: Any normal PVA ("wood glue") should be fine. Superglue might be quicker, but it can be fussy, so practice with it on another piece of wood if you go that route, so you know what to expect. ...


0

For general hardness and strength, I would choose a hardwood. To resist cracking, I would choose a diffuse porous wood, and avoid grain runout (wood fibers should be approximately parallel to the sides) Maple would be ideal. Cherry or birch would be good too. Ring porous woods like oak, ash, or hickory are more prone to crack. These woods are deliberately ...


4

It seems like you are actually asking several questions here, so I'll break down my answer: Is spruce appropriate? short answer: yes. A softwood like spruce will be relatively inexpensive, and plenty strong enough if you use thick enough pieces. Be aware that it may dent more easily than a hardwood. For a project like this, almost any kind of wood will be ...


0

Just to propose an alternative: You could consider applying dewaxed shellac or other over the stains to seal them in, and let them be part of the item's history. (I'm presuming her main concern is that it might smudge other things around it. If she really wants it to look "clean", of course, this suggestion isn't useful.)


2

Here's a few tricks I've learned from cleaning up a few old wooden handplanes, where I wanted them to look nice without taking all the patina off: give it a rub-down with oil, either curing (e.g. linseed oil), or non-curing (e.g. mineral oil, camellia oil). If you use a curing oil, it's more permanent. This may even out the stains a little bit without ...


1

I recently put in a set of hardwood (oak) stairs and finished with a water based stain and water based coating (several coats until I liked the look). We have thousands of trips up and down and there is absolutely no visible wear. Not to say there won't be BUT it is impressive so far that there is no wear. Three dogs up and down with us most trips too!


4

"White wood" is a generic term for whatever fast-growing wood is cheapest at that time and in that place. It may be pine, fir, or occasionally even poplar (which is as fast-growing and soft as most "softwoods" despute being considered a hardwood). It will be a solid wood, though there may be cases where boards have been spliced to get useful sizes.


3

From the picture you can tell that it is solid wood because you can see the annual rings, and they are continuous over the whole width of the stud, so nothing is glued together.


0

If the paint is peeling off the wood surface then most likely there was a problem with how the cabinet was prepared for the paint or with the paint itself. Painting any surface located in a kitchen takes more effort and attention to details when prepping it for paint. As you already know grease from cooking that becomes airborne in water vapor will adhere ...


0

The paint isn't the main issue here. Repainting is just a temporary fix as the grease comes back. If it's upper cabinets as well, then your exhaust fan isn't working well enough and needs to be cleaned or replaced. However, I'd suggest just looking up some good degreasers to clean it off with. Dawn, magic erasers (could harm the paint), etc.


1

Mineral spirits won't work. You need something stronger like acetone. If you have ceramic tiles they won't be harmed.


0

I would trying using Mineral Spirits with a scrap piece of cloth or a toothbrush/brush to scrub if need be. Mineral Spirits is used to clean brushes and other finishes from other things, so this may be something to try.


0

I'm not sure of the exact formulas as I'm sure they're fairly complex but the John Bridge Deflect-o-meter is a good place to start: http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/deflecto.pl


-2

I would use an old solid tableleaf. ThankYou


0

Isn't the answer obvious? Look a nail and at a screw. The shank of nail is smooth, assuming regular nails. So, the only thing keeping them secure is the pressure of the material (typically wood) round the shank when installed. Now, look at a screw. The shank has a spiral groove that OBVIOUSLY yields much more resistance to being pulled out of the wood it ...


3

The building code does address the width, profile, and the rounding of the treads. From the 2009 IBC: R311.5.3.3 Profile. The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be no greater than 9/16 inch (14 mm). I believe the reason for rounding the leading edge of the tread with wood is to reduce the likelihood of splintering. Also, ...


5

Long (18" and longer) drill bits do exist. If the hole is wide enough, bit extensions are also usable. However, there's also a simple-but-elegant cheat. Cut the piece lengthwise, rout a channel in one or both sides, glue back together. If you make a thin-kerf cut, and are careful during reassembly, the glue line can be nearly invisible -- especially on ...


0

Clear flakes are probably some type of varnish. I would sand the surface to remove the loose flakes and to make the surface as flat as possible, then refinish with a similar varnish. I would follow the instructions on the container very carefully. Preparation is important for a good result. You can buy tack-cloths to remove dust before applying varnish. ...


1

I like these screw remover bits from sears They have saved me a ton of trouble and are not very expensive.


3

Using a thin cutoff disk in a rotary tool (Dremel), cut a slot in each screw that fits a medium-sized flat-blade screwdriver.


1

The answer is simply No. PT wood will warp if you let it sit. It would have to be in an ultra controlled environment to dry and not warp horribly.


1

Yes, let it dry. Working with wet treated wood is a very bad idea unless you like shrinkage, cracks, gaps, squeaks, etc. Let your framing and decking dry out first. Here in Oregon that means buy the wood and store it in a DRY place. Building with wet wood only causes issue later.


0

Drill a small hole and use a nail to find out how much wood behind the metal. If little wood, do not use wood screws, or you will strip the metal or the screws. I would drill the holes slightly smaller than the diameter of the metal screws (finer thread) you will use. Then get an extra set of metal screws and file the tip a little into a taper. Use your ...


2

Was there originally a piece of molding along the bottom of that cabinet? It looks like there was, and it also looks like the "crack" is actually just the joint where two separate pieces of wood were put together to form the side of the cabinet. If this is true, I would presume that the molding along the bottom used to help hold the side pieces together. ...


2

The wood will swell slightly with higher humidity but if you don't have it in a frame and are mounting it like a sliding barn door then I wouldn't worry about expansion. The problem with expansion is mostly for doors and windows in frames that causes them to jam. Also, like the picture you posted, if the wood is cross-cut it will be less likely to expand ...


0

Some of this is a repeat of Tyler's post, but I just wanted to start from scratch and explain my take on it... The spacing of the supports for the bar will most likely fall in places where there is no framing. It would be a rare coincidence if it does. If you are going to use this as a pull up bar for exercise, you will need to install a large enough ...


0

Wooden wall? Pretty rare that walls are made of wood. Are you talking about the molding around the doorway? The following diagram shows a typical way that a door might be framed: Every door is a little different, so you need to determine how your door is framed. Your goal is to get the provided lag bolts to go at least 3.5 cm into solid wood. (I would ...


0

The circled part is known as the bottom rail; the vertical part is a stile; the assembled rails and stiles are the face frame. The stile could be joined to the rail with a simple butt joint, or pocket screws, or a mortise-and-tenon joint, etc.


1

First of all, if anything is rotted, there's a water problem. Make sure that's fixed first. As for the piece that's circled, if that is rotted, then I'm wondering if the water problem is bigger than we think. How's the floor in that area? As for replacing that one piece, there's no easy way to do that as it's likely screwed/nailed and glued. You can ...


0

If your cabinets are already painted (not stained), then I would absolutely recommend to just sand it and repaint it. Use an outdoor rated paint to resist water damage in the future.



Top 50 recent answers are included