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1

I recently replaced the door handle on my front door. There were two holes left from the old handle. I filled them with Plastic Wood, then sanded flush. Then, I took a awl and mimicked the grain pattern. It looks spectacular. After priming and painting, my mother could not even see where the hole was. You can do it!


0

Spar varnish, no exposed natural wood. Stain doesn't cut it, they hate gnawing through paint. We use a couple red or incense cedar chunks in various places like you use Zinc sacrificial anodes for marine electrolysis control.


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The only thing I use is lightweight Spackle. First fill is fast with your finger. In 20 mins clean off the excess with a damp sponge. 15 minutes later put on a second coat to fill any indents. Again, after 20 mins sponge it off very gently. After an hour sand it if needed and it will be perfect. Minor touch up if needed until you get the nack. I have ...


0

Spackle is best. It's cheap, easy, water clean up and you can completely remove it if need be any time later before you paint. And it can't hurt anything, because there's nothing you can't clean it off of or out of at any time later too. First screw, nail and/or glue anything that has movement. fill in all cracks and imperfections, trim to wall and trim to ...


1

You want spackle. It sticks, it doesn't shrink, and it can be sanded flush. For more detail, see this awesome article that turned me on to the technique: http://www.thejoyofmoldings.com/when-to-use-spackling-and-when-to-use-caulk-moldings/ Spackle is probably one of my favorite compounds; it just has so many uses!


1

I have always had good luck with pencil fillers such as the one below. It takes a little practice to get it to fill the hole evenly, but works great once you get the hang of it. It will also never shrink, since nothing is drying. These come in all sorts of colors: mostly various wood-shades, but also plain colors such as white.


3

Less wiping. More time before sanding. Unless you go to something extreme like epoxy putty, it all shrinks. If you leave the filler proud of (sticking above) the hole, let it cure fully, and then sand it down, it should work. In extreme cases you may need to refill and let that cure, but that's adding more time to the program which is probably not good ...


0

Regular framing lumber in good condition held together with boards running perpendicular every 2' or less would work well. Have the boards underneath in "on edge" position would work best. Here you can see a different version where we have 2x10 planks with a 2x6 "strong-back" (on edge) screwed to the bottom to keep the deflection to a minimum: And from ...


2

Regular framing lumber will do what you need. You will not want to place a ladder on individual 2Xs that make up your scaffolding. The deflection on one 2X will feel enormous when you are on the top of a ladder. 2X4s are cool as long as there are no large knots, and you fill the area. #2 grade 2X needs to be watched for this. Don't even use #3 grade. I have ...


1

Wood 2x4s should be adequate, especially since the ladder will be distributing the load to four points. However, to allow a reasonable amount of ladder walking, non-precise foot placement, and protect against random defects, earthquakes, etc., 2x6s or larger would be entirely appropriate. I bought a 20' 2x12 years ago for such a project and have made all ...


1

You should try using electrical tape. I have successfully used electrical tape a multitude of times as a "cusp" around glass capillary tubing. The tape peels off easily after the epoxy has set


5

Thank you to everyone for your insight! I made a quick stop at the Lowes down the street and picked up a few inexpensive options you all mentioned. The one that absolutely stood out for my purposes was the drill rasp. As soon as I began I knew it was the one. I went back over 4 holes, each taking about 1-2 minutes to effectively widen and shape. I was ...


4

I have built a few and I used casting resin. i got it from a fiberglass boat builder. it set up very fast but is self leveling. we let it drip off the sides and cleaned up the edges after it cured with a router and 440 and 1600 paper. I have encased fishing lures, German coasters etc. it cures hard as stone and very transparent. It has to be poured ...


0

I have not actually done this sort of top - I grew out of love with the idea before I got around to making one. I have seen descriptions of building a temporary edge with wide masking tape. You might want to reinforce that with a band clamp. Of course, the little metal bottle caps are supposed to be nailed upside down on the floor, to give you the sensation ...


4

Three methods I can think of. Enlarge by friction Your idea of wrapping the bit in sandpaper isn't even bad. The only "right" way to do this is a different bit, and that's not even worht it. You just probably used the wrong sandpaper. Try some 80 grit and make sure to go in a back and forth pattern, roughly every half inch you plunge. There also exists ...


2

I am not saying that this way is the best nor is it recommended on high-end finishes but I simply would maneuver the current bit around the hole until it was bigger. You will get to 1/16" quickly with this method. To make it more effective just keep the bit perpendicular to the board at all times and don't put a ton of force on the edges. I will also put ...


10

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


4

I think your best bet is to use a sanding process to open up the hole. It may take a while but should get you there eventually. When I had a similar problem I took a piece of 1/2 inch diameter birch dowel rod (about nine inches long) and cut a slot across its end. Then inserted a folded over piece of sand paper to make a two sided flap sander. Chucked into ...


1

Agreeing with Comintern. So long as you're up to code, greater stud distance and even screw spacing (yes, that's right) will give you a higher STC (sound transmission coefficient) by decreasing connection points for sound to travel through the wall. The screw spacing is more important for the second layer since it physically connects the studs to the outside ...


0

How about replacing the strips of hardwood you removed? This is an easy project for any finishing carpenter and most general handymen. You could either try to match the rest of the flooring—which isn't that hard. Or us a dark wood, maybe dark stained wood for some contrast.


0

Buy a small bag of concrete floor patch: it mixes like pancake batter and sets a light gray. This is what you fill that gap with. It gets hard as concrete and will adhere to the existing stone. If you don't want it to stick to the wood then mask off the wood before. It also helps to protect the top of the wood with masking tape. If you need more of a curb ...



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