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4

Answer: yes, if scraping and thorough sanding (coarse, then medium, then fine grit) until smooth does not remove the old paint than feel free to prime and paint right over it. Do not pay attention to those that say "you must test for compatibility with the new paint" or "don't paint it with latex (water-based) paint if it might be old alkyd (oil-based) ...


3

Cutting a miter like that is best done on a table saw with a crosscut sled, or with a well tuned miter saw, or (failing either of those options) rough cutting the miter with a hand or circular saw and then dressing them with a hand plane or large disk sander. Given the dimensions your best option at this point is to use what's called a "donkey ear shooting ...


2

Backyard boatbuilders often work with epoxy and polyester resin like Mr. Homes mentions. Saran Wrap and waxed paper are popular and common materials for creating surfaces for containing these resins. Masking tape will not be easily removed. When selecting your resin, keep in mind that you may have some control over how fast it sets. Some resins are made to ...


2

To clean and de-wax the old floor, as well as smooth out the areas that are worn with those that are not, use #1 steel wool and a 50/50 mixture of denatured alcohol and lacquer thinner to clean the floor. It's a laborious process, but if you do the entire floor working from the non-worn edges into the center, it will brighten the entire floor and clean it of ...


2

Sanding The core of the sanding must be done before you finish your work; in other words, just after stripping. Most paint strippers won't do a perfect job, sanding will help you remove the leftovers. Sanding can also be used to remove any existing scratches or dents. Raising the grain (Optional) Once your piece is perfect (no visible scratches and ...


2

It looks like you neither sanded with the grain or used a fine enough sandpaper in order to prepare for staining. I think you have to go sand it down and start over. Those likely would have been visible before staining.


1

Try using oxalic acid - you may be able to buy it at the local hardware store as "wood bleach"; it comes in crystal form to be mixed with water. Pity, though, to take that marvelous color out of sapele! Good thing you didn't buy bloodwood (muninga) or redheart... 8)


1

The maximum load you can place on a relatively slender column such as a table leg is usually dictated by the buckling strength, rather than the compressive strength. The critical load can be calculated using Euler's formula applied to a fixed-free column: Pcr= (pi^2*EI)/(f*Le^2) where E is the modulus of elasticity I is the area moment of inertia ...


1

For any load bearing construction, you want wood-on-wood carrying the load, rather than lateral bolts carrying a shearing load. Give your bed some legs. You can still screw it to the wall, but the load should be going from the wood frame, to wood legs, to floor.


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Cleaning the piece is a good start. You should use a cleaner intended for furniture that does not leave any wax or polish behind, such as Simple Green (there are many others). Some of the light colored marks may come off. Since it is an older piece and you don't want to do an overall refinishing, you can touch up the lighter spots and the small gouges with ...


1

Since the piece is already distressed I'd say just go with it. Lightly sand out any rough spots with 280, clean off the white marks with whatever works and then take a gel stain that matches the color of the distressed edges (the lighter reddish color). Once that's dry (3-4 hours, longer if its cold and humid, no harm in waiting overnight) take a low sheen ...


1

You need to figure out what the finish is before you do anything. I suspect it is some kind of solid stain or paint with a polyurethane clear coat, but it could be epoxy or any other number of combinations. The type of wood doesn't matter much in your case. Here's one resource to help with your analysis. Keep googling. And check the back and bottom for ...


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We had a conference room table at my work with a polyurethane finish on it that was flaking off. Since I am a nerd, I measured the thickness of one of these flakes: .003 inches. FWIW. I also measured the thickness of a few other things to compare this to: a thin planer shaving was .001". A noticeably thick planer shaving: .01" In a recent blog post at ...


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Finish is very different from paint in this regard, paint (particularly latex) builds much heavier and never really cures as hard as a good finish so it always feels grabby on sliding surfaces. The first coat of any finish doesn't really add any thickness as it mostly soaks into the would fiber. And unless you plan on adding some very heavy or numerous ...


1

Wet and dry surface coating film thickness calculations are complicated and dependent on several factors (varnish/paint solids content, applicator, application method), an "average" per coat thickness, if one was pressed to give it, would be 35 microns dry thickness for alkyd varnish. Paints vary widely. Why do you not paint or varnish after assembly?


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I agree with James. Use paint stripper, and give it a thorough rinsing. The can of stripper will have the instructions on rinsing. After that, then have at it with the sanding. The reason being, the finish will sand differently than the bare wood and the bare wood will lose, dishing it out slightly before the finish is removed. The stripper will allow the ...


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In general, finish coats will not absorb any stain. The finish seals the pores of the wood preventing anything from penetrating. True stain can only be put on wood that does not have a sealer on it. Where you sanded, you removed the sealing finish coat. That let the stain penetrate and darken the wood more than the surrounding areas. The only real fix now ...



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