Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

That is maple. Plain old, flat sawn rock maple. There's no way to tell from the pictures if its engineered or solid but if you knock on it the sound will tell you. Solid sounds very dull, like knocking on a sidewalk. Engineered hardwood, even if its installed very well, sounds a bit hollow. You might not notice it when you walk across the room but if you tap ...


8

Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight ...


6

Speculation: I'm going to go with it is the panel just behind the drivers seat in a RV that makes a bed and covers the battery and the generator, as it has a fire coating applied by either Almex or Fritz Industries for a recreational vehicle probably manufactured in Canada.


6

Here's a low-tech method that's worked well for me: Attach a loop of rope around the bottom corners and pull it up in the middle on the outside with your arm going over it and your other arm holding it stable in your armpit.


5

The attached pieces and legs may have exacerbated the effects by not moving with the seat but a piece of pine of that size was probably destined to crack regardless. You can try to weep glue down into it (run a line of yellow glue over the crack then blow it down into the void with an air nozzle) and then clamp out the space but it probably won't be ...


4

You might find that spending a little time and effort upgrading your 1/4 mile path, potentially even building some small bridges for the water hazards, pays large benefits in the ease of hauling materials to your building site. You could probably also customize a wheelbarrow for the panel-carrying job - ideally starting with one that needs a new pan, or else ...


4

In many cases that is epoxy, mixed with lamp black or another colorant. (There are tints which can be used to more closely match the color of the surrounding wood, but in fact black usually looks pretty reasonable.)


4

How do I connect [1x4 wood] together at 90 degrees while maintaining a solid connection? If you can obtain a hand-saw (e.g. tenon-saw/back-saw), some sandpaper and some wood glue, you can make lap-joints. I find they are the easiest way for me to make rigid joints in wood. To join wood the other way, for a strong joint I'd try a simple finger joint ...


3

I would just drill pilot holes and screw it together, you don't need to do fancy cuts in the wood. If you need extra stability, put in a diagonal (diagonal cuts all the way across a board are much easier than notching). I would put in a small diagonal brace on each corner, although it would be easier to just use a large one across the whole frame. I built a ...


3

I would find it hard to believe that someone would sand a wood floor but then neglect to put a protective finish on it (unless this is a very rustic building like a barn?). It's possible there's varnish there but it's not a glossy type. An unfinished wood floor seems like a negligent decision by the landlord and a bad investment on their part. I would check ...


2

Another traditional approach to reinforcing cracked wood is to install a "butterfly key" (also known as "bowtie key"). This is essentially an inlaid piece that acts as a pair of dovetail joints to tie the two sides together. Keys can be as larger or small as desired, in similar wood or contrasting wood ... the latter is a bit more common since the key's ...


2

There's a good product that I have used before called 'Ronseal Multipurpose Wood Filler Tub - Dark' you can pick it up for about £6 from the likes of Homebase etc. It gives a nice finish to fill the wood cracks and it dries dark. Can also be used for exterior furniture


2

Which way is the 90 degrees connection going? ie are the pieces of wood in the same plane (a flat joint)? If they are, you could use a use a half-lap joint (or perhaps a mitre). Or are the pieces of wood in different planes? This gives you various options for the joint, for example: Rebated joint. Mitre Biscuit joint (possibly also with a mitre) Box / ...


2

It works for pole barns, it will work for your deck. However, be careful of the quality and/or treatment of your PT lumber - I've seen pressure treated lumber rot off in the ground despite being pressure treated. I think the thicker sections (such as 6x6) are rather difficult to get throughly treated all the way through. I've seen some pole barns use 3 2x6 ...


1

Flat sawn (note the cathedral pattern), but more than that? Meh. Likely maple, but there are a bunch of central / south american woods that are cheap and similar in appearance. Definitely not bamboo, which is a monocot, and has a distinctive appearance.


1

If the base is hollow and open at the bottom, I would try making it slide around something heavy. Make a concrete block or something that will fit fairly tightly inside the base. Make it a bit shorter than the base to ensure the table goes all the way to the floor. Then when you setup the table you sit the block on the floor, lift up the table and slide ...


1

If you can dig down 4 feet, it's really easy to put a sonotube down and fill it with concrete and put the 6x6 (you might only need 4x4...depends on deck dimensions) on that. source: that's what I did.


1

Some woods, especially softwoods such as pine/fir/spruce, are notorious for taking stain oddly. The usual solution is to "condition" the wood before staining, to reduce absorbancy overall and make them behave more like we would expect. There are products sold specifically for the purpose, or dewaxed shellac can be used. Many discussions of this exist on ...


1

The usual answer for repeatability is "make a jig". Build a frame out of 2x4s, attach it to the sheet that you want to cut, and then set the base of the circular saw inside the frame. That will give you a very repeatable hole.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible