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10

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


5

Thank you to everyone for your insight! I made a quick stop at the Lowes down the street and picked up a few inexpensive options you all mentioned. The one that absolutely stood out for my purposes was the drill rasp. As soon as I began I knew it was the one. I went back over 4 holes, each taking about 1-2 minutes to effectively widen and shape. I was ...


4

For starters, I am going to guess you used a water based urethane instead of an oil based product? I have never seen a good oil based product react as you described to simple spills. I have seen some damage caused by very hot items being placed on a urethane finish, but normally, liquids will bead up and not penetrate the finish. Even though the water based ...


4

I think your best bet is to use a sanding process to open up the hole. It may take a while but should get you there eventually. When I had a similar problem I took a piece of 1/2 inch diameter birch dowel rod (about nine inches long) and cut a slot across its end. Then inserted a folded over piece of sand paper to make a two sided flap sander. Chucked into ...


4

Three methods I can think of. Enlarge by friction Your idea of wrapping the bit in sandpaper isn't even bad. The only "right" way to do this is a different bit, and that's not even worht it. You just probably used the wrong sandpaper. Try some 80 grit and make sure to go in a back and forth pattern, roughly every half inch you plunge. There also exists ...


4

I have built a few and I used casting resin. i got it from a fiberglass boat builder. it set up very fast but is self leveling. we let it drip off the sides and cleaned up the edges after it cured with a router and 440 and 1600 paper. I have encased fishing lures, German coasters etc. it cures hard as stone and very transparent. It has to be poured ...


3

Less wiping. More time before sanding. Unless you go to something extreme like epoxy putty, it all shrinks. If you leave the filler proud of (sticking above) the hole, let it cure fully, and then sand it down, it should work. In extreme cases you may need to refill and let that cure, but that's adding more time to the program which is probably not good ...


2

I am not saying that this way is the best nor is it recommended on high-end finishes but I simply would maneuver the current bit around the hole until it was bigger. You will get to 1/16" quickly with this method. To make it more effective just keep the bit perpendicular to the board at all times and don't put a ton of force on the edges. I will also put ...


2

Regular framing lumber will do what you need. You will not want to place a ladder on individual 2Xs that make up your scaffolding. The deflection on one 2X will feel enormous when you are on the top of a ladder. 2X4s are cool as long as there are no large knots, and you fill the area. #2 grade 2X needs to be watched for this. Don't even use #3 grade. I have ...


1

Wood 2x4s should be adequate, especially since the ladder will be distributing the load to four points. However, to allow a reasonable amount of ladder walking, non-precise foot placement, and protect against random defects, earthquakes, etc., 2x6s or larger would be entirely appropriate. I bought a 20' 2x12 years ago for such a project and have made all ...


1

I recently replaced the door handle on my front door. There were two holes left from the old handle. I filled them with Plastic Wood, then sanded flush. Then, I took a awl and mimicked the grain pattern. It looks spectacular. After priming and painting, my mother could not even see where the hole was. You can do it!


1

You want spackle. It sticks, it doesn't shrink, and it can be sanded flush. For more detail, see this awesome article that turned me on to the technique: http://www.thejoyofmoldings.com/when-to-use-spackling-and-when-to-use-caulk-moldings/ Spackle is probably one of my favorite compounds; it just has so many uses!


1

I have always had good luck with pencil fillers such as the one below. It takes a little practice to get it to fill the hole evenly, but works great once you get the hang of it. It will also never shrink, since nothing is drying. These come in all sorts of colors: mostly various wood-shades, but also plain colors such as white.


1

Agreeing with Comintern. So long as you're up to code, greater stud distance and even screw spacing (yes, that's right) will give you a higher STC (sound transmission coefficient) by decreasing connection points for sound to travel through the wall. The screw spacing is more important for the second layer since it physically connects the studs to the outside ...



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