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5

Long (18" and longer) drill bits do exist. If the hole is wide enough, bit extensions are also usable. However, there's also a simple-but-elegant cheat. Cut the piece lengthwise, rout a channel in one or both sides, glue back together. If you make a thin-kerf cut, and are careful during reassembly, the glue line can be nearly invisible -- especially on ...


4

It seems like you are actually asking several questions here, so I'll break down my answer: Is spruce appropriate? short answer: yes. A softwood like spruce will be relatively inexpensive, and plenty strong enough if you use thick enough pieces. Be aware that it may dent more easily than a hardwood. For a project like this, almost any kind of wood will be ...


4

"White wood" is a generic term for whatever fast-growing wood is cheapest at that time and in that place. It may be pine, fir, or occasionally even poplar (which is as fast-growing and soft as most "softwoods" despute being considered a hardwood). It will be a solid wood, though there may be cases where boards have been spliced to get useful sizes.


3

The building code does address the width, profile, and the rounding of the treads. From the 2009 IBC: R311.5.3.3 Profile. The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be no greater than 9/16 inch (14 mm). I believe the reason for rounding the leading edge of the tread with wood is to reduce the likelihood of splintering. Also, ...


3

From the picture you can tell that it is solid wood because you can see the annual rings, and they are continuous over the whole width of the stud, so nothing is glued together.


3

Using a thin cutoff disk in a rotary tool (Dremel), cut a slot in each screw that fits a medium-sized flat-blade screwdriver.


2

Was there originally a piece of molding along the bottom of that cabinet? It looks like there was, and it also looks like the "crack" is actually just the joint where two separate pieces of wood were put together to form the side of the cabinet. If this is true, I would presume that the molding along the bottom used to help hold the side pieces together. ...


2

The wood will swell slightly with higher humidity but if you don't have it in a frame and are mounting it like a sliding barn door then I wouldn't worry about expansion. The problem with expansion is mostly for doors and windows in frames that causes them to jam. Also, like the picture you posted, if the wood is cross-cut it will be less likely to expand ...


2

Here's a few tricks I've learned from cleaning up a few old wooden handplanes, where I wanted them to look nice without taking all the patina off: give it a rub-down with oil, either curing (e.g. linseed oil), or non-curing (e.g. mineral oil, camellia oil). If you use a curing oil, it's more permanent. This may even out the stains a little bit without ...


2

No, there's no problem doing so. In fact, you probably have the best substructure there. You'll find a 2x6 or larger header either directly above the window or below the top wall plate. You should also find "cripple" or "pin" studs on standard centers over or under the header. Be aware that some header designs leave a 1/2" or larger insulated gap between ...


2

It looks like it will press right back into place, so it really comes down to what type of glue to use, and how to clamp. Here's what I would do: Choose a glue: Any normal PVA ("wood glue") should be fine. Superglue might be quicker, but it can be fussy, so practice with it on another piece of wood if you go that route, so you know what to expect. ...


1

Mineral spirits won't work. You need something stronger like acetone. If you have ceramic tiles they won't be harmed.


1

I like these screw remover bits from sears They have saved me a ton of trouble and are not very expensive.


1

I recently put in a set of hardwood (oak) stairs and finished with a water based stain and water based coating (several coats until I liked the look). We have thousands of trips up and down and there is absolutely no visible wear. Not to say there won't be BUT it is impressive so far that there is no wear. Three dogs up and down with us most trips too!


1

The answer is simply No. PT wood will warp if you let it sit. It would have to be in an ultra controlled environment to dry and not warp horribly.


1

Yes, let it dry. Working with wet treated wood is a very bad idea unless you like shrinkage, cracks, gaps, squeaks, etc. Let your framing and decking dry out first. Here in Oregon that means buy the wood and store it in a DRY place. Building with wet wood only causes issue later.


1

First of all, if anything is rotted, there's a water problem. Make sure that's fixed first. As for the piece that's circled, if that is rotted, then I'm wondering if the water problem is bigger than we think. How's the floor in that area? As for replacing that one piece, there's no easy way to do that as it's likely screwed/nailed and glued. You can ...


1

A simply supported beam under a load W, with span L has a midspan deflection of: WL^3/EI * 5/384 if the load is distributed along the length WL^3/EI * 1/48 if the load is applied at midspan I for a rectangular section is breadth times depth cubed, all divided by 12 (I = bd^3/12). Your dimensions aren't clear, but I'll assume b = 11.5 inches and d = 1.25 ...


1

Short answer: it will sag a lot. Using The Sagulator I get a deflection of about 0.9" at the center, which will clearly be noticeable. (I'm assuming your "5/4 maple" is actually going to end up 1" thick when the finishing is done.) Also I'm not sure what you are going to be using the shelving for but if this is going to be for books you should probably ...


1

The only problem you may find is accidently kicking in the glass when using the exercise equipment. Other than that the wall studs are spaced 16" O/C only shorter above the header spanning the windows' width.



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