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3

I would expect that most retail outlets do not offer to run wood through a shaper or do router work. What you really want to look for is a crafts-person that has the tools to do this for you. If your intent is to avoid having to pay someone to do a project like this then take the opportunity to figure out how you can do it yourself. There are a number of ...


3

Pine comes to mind immediately. Most big box home centers will carry a selection of 1"x pine- that is perfect for shelving. Another option would be poplar, though it's a bit more expensive (generally). Any softwood would do, but those two are the most common.


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I would be concerned. Have the general contractor figure out who is out of specification and have them fix it. (My guess is that the concrete is to blame, but I'm not there with a measuring tape.) I strongly suggest that you don't let the house be built out of square. Among other things, it'll cost a bit more at just about every step.


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If the sap is really hard, you should be able to knock it off with a quick swipe with a scraper. The finish underneath might be compromised, though. If its still a bit gooey, you might try hitting it with a spurt of compressed air from a can to cool it down.


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Some fences are never stained. Keep in mind that sunlight will "bleach" wood that is not protected from UV light. So, you can leave the fence as-is but it might significantly weather with no protection, depending on whether the pressure washing damages whatever existing finish is on it now. Also, you don't necessarily want it to be hot when applying an ...


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Sometimes concrete just doesn't cooperate. I'd say up to an inch out of play is the carpenter's job to deal with. Two and a half inches! is possibly a problem for lawyers... Had the distance been fudged to one and a quarter inches on both sides, (harrumph) maybe that'd be OK... I'd be interested in what the permissible 'fudge factor' for sill plates ...


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2x6 DF #2 Supported o the ends can handle about 11 lb. per Ln. Ft. total load. This would include snow. would recommend at least 2x8 if you are okay with sagging from wood creep after many years. 4x8, (2) 2x8, or 2x10 would be better.


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One possibility would be to get a piece of quarter-round and glue or otherwise affix it to the edges of a flat-sided piece of wood matching the non-rounded dimensions that you need. The corners will need to be dealt with, and could be cut with a lot of work with a random orbital sander. Another option is to shape the quarter-round by hand as suggested ...



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