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5

What you described with the 45 degree bevel is called a french cleat. It's used for securing heavy items to walls and I've seen them used in upper kitchen cabinet installations. 1x6 hardwood cut in half on a 45 I think would suffice. I would consider putting one on the top and one on the bottom (mounted upside down) if you have enough room to slide the ...


4

My suggestion is to dump the use of the 18 gauge brads. There is absolutely no reason to use anything bigger than 3/4" x 3/4" material for this type of internal joint block. Use flat head wood screws placed into pre-drilled countersunk clearance holes in these glue blocks. Then apply glue to the block faces where it meets the cabinet sides and install the ...


3

You will not make the crack go away, at least not with out destroying the texture of the finish. If the core material is particle board, it will be even more difficult. You could, as mentioned in the comment put something over it to flatten it, but it will take a driving force to set it back flush, or near flush. This is where particle board will NOT treat ...


3

That is a very expensive podium, probably has a cost in the 20K range. You can do laminated wood and then cut into the curve (very expensive as it takes a large amount of high quality wood) or you can try some cheaper options using plywood. If you only need to do a slight curve, thin plywood has a lot of flex in it. Just nail/screw it onto a frame. If ...


3

As @OrgnicLawnDIY suggests, use french cleats. These are 1x4 or 1x6 boards cut on a 45 degree angle. The lower section has the short side against the wall and the upper section, attached to the item to be hung, lowers into the trough created to snug the piece into the wall. Many carpenters use strips of 3/4" or 1 " plywood instead of solid boards. You can ...


2

If you have a limited amount of woodworking tools you could use molding. It will cover the seams. Use an "external corner" molding. You can cut it with almost any wood saw. It is usually available in several species of wood. It will stain, paint or finish like the panels.


2

To the eye, wood grain is a change in color or evenness of the surface. It may take the form of subtle shading across a piece wide or narrow stripes running along or across darker or lighter colors around a blemish (such as a knot) in the wood strong figures, such as chevrons or swirls of a contrasting color small pits (open grain) running in broken lines ...


2

Hand-held jigsaws are not the right tool for cutting large notches in a 6x6 post. Yes, the blade must extend past the wood - they only cut on the front of the blade, not the bottom. And the blade will drift quite a bit going through 6 inches of lumber. Jigsaws are meant for fine detail work, not large straight cuts. However, a close cousin is the ...


2

There's a fair amount of detail work there, but I don't see anything hugely difficult. Curves: others have mentioned the standard approaches, eithr build up a blank from segments and then cut to shape or use wood-bending techniques. Correction yo my first thought: flat painted ring with bent/stained/varnished molding would achieve most of the effect at ...


2

If the raised bed is sitting on the ground no bottom is required. A bottom would only be required if you are protecting the surface below the raised bed. If the raised bed is set on a flat roof, a wooden deck, patio that would be subject to staining by the soil, etc. then you would want a bottom on it. You still need to allow for some drainage. A word of ...


2

In general, it's the final layer that determines the amount of gloss in the finish. Adding another layer of matte should do it. However, another layer of stain will deepen the color. I presume from your wording that you are actually using an all in one stain and poly finish (minwax?)... That's the hazard with using those - everything needs the same number ...


1

Coat the desk top with a UV resistant coating like a good marine spar varnish. Won't stop it completely but will slow it down significantly. If you get a desk top made of a real wood top (not a paper thin veneer over particle board) you can sand and restain in over and over when it fades too much.


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I don't know where you live, but in large areas there will be a plywood supplier and he almost certainly has pre-kerfed MDF and such.


1

I'm with Lawrence on this, where there is blame, there is a claim. If you want to have a go at fixing however then go to a ships chandler and get a good glue from them. However, the trick is to clamp the pieces tight. I don't mean but some books on it but use something that has a vice-like grip spread over 3 or 4 inches. All that said, if this is an area not ...


1

Z-clips are french cleats made from aluminum- they come in all kinds of lengths and keep the hanged piece about 3/16 from the wall- they will have holes to attach one piece to the wall/studs and the other to screw to the back-they can hold a lot of weight (we've hung whole mahogany wall panels with them) The item can easily slide left to right to center. ...


1

Utilize a big enough Flat panel TV mount. This would keep the mount itself hidden, keep it close to the wall, and provide the strength you need to keep it on the wall. You'd just need to find a way to affix the art to the mount without destroying the art ... If you are not afraid of what exactly is attached to the back, epoxy might do the trick. Applying ...


1

I would do this with multiple passes with a table saw, using a jig and standing the piece on its end to get the proper orientation. Carefully cutting it with a band saw would do pretty good to, but not everybody has a table or band saw. Compared to a jig saw, for this type of cut, you may do as good with a circular saw. It would not be the safe way to do it ...


1

At its most basic, wood grain is the variable density of the concentric growth rings caused by seasonal changes, moisture availability and growth environment. For decorative purposes, wood burl, bird's eye, ray fleck, color variation between heartwood/sapwood and other growth oddities also enter into the equation. How it affects wood use and finish depends ...


1

I had exactly the same problem on a varnished wood table and yesterday came up with my own solution, washing up liquid mixed to a paste with washing powder applied with a sponge in a circular motion, it removed an 8 inch stain in15 minutes without any damage at all to the finish on the gloss varnish



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