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9

It has to do more with the quality of the the 2x6s vs the 4x6. A 4x6 x 12 board would have to be clear all the way through, with no cracks or knots. Most softwood logs won't produce this board, and if it cracks, it is likely to break more easily vs the 2x6. On the other hand, drilling a bunch of holes in a 2x6 does it no favors, though because the two ...


7

Boards that are laminated in some fashion get an overall durability increase (not necessarily net strength increase) because they no longer suffer from a single grain dimension through the thickness. Primarily, in the case you describe a split or warp will not impact the whole board, only half of it. A properly laminated beam (like VersaLam or Glulam) does ...


5

The Scout Pioneering website contains information on how to build several bridges. I am guessing that most of these are more complicated than what you had in mind, so if you want something simpler, you can attempt flat span bridge using 2x12's for a span between 14 and 18 feet. On the latter page the author goes on to say that "[i]f you are thinking of ...


4

It sounds like you have solid 13/16" thick plywood for a wall. If that is the case, I'd drill holes matching holes in the mount all the way through, get four metal bolts, four matching nuts and eight washers, and hang the mount on the wall, securing with nuts from the opposite side of the wall and using threadlocker on bolt threads. You would have nuts ...


4

You say a dark stain, which is good, but the peanut oil has already filled some of the space where the stain can soak in. That's bad. You don't want visibly lighter handprints on your steps. I'd go with rags liberally moistened with mineral spirits. Let them sit on the spots for half an hour or so, then scrub vigorously. You'll know if you succeeded when the ...


3

If you used a set of simple pulleys similar to these: And then used 5/16" type screw eyes that were inserted into studs or ceiling joists using the proper sized pilot holes: This should lead to strong and robust bike hoist system. Open the loop of the screw eye with the aid of a vice to hook the pulley on. Then squeeze the eye shut again using the ...


3

In architecture we use laminated timber in order to reach long distances. It would be impossible otherwise. Here is just to reduce weak spots. By the way, that is not a real laminated timber but just a pair of beam. laminated beam are mated differently: ___________ ____________ ___________ _____ ___________ ___________ ______ ___________ ____________ ...


3

It depends on the filler material used, but the most likely candidates would be caulk or wood filler/putty. Caulk remains somewhat flexible after drying. It will probably be white. You can trim it with a razor blade to remove the excess. Assuming the caulk is a paintable type, you can then apply primer and paint your trim to conceal the patch. If you need ...


2

I would use "Post spikes" for this. They'll last longer than wood below ground.


2

I've always just held the decking back from the skirt (which is fastened tight to framing) to create a gap, but this obviously results in an undrained channel. I can see the benefit of your plan for allowing small tree debris and other dirt to drop out. Rip some 5mm strips of your decking material from scrap and cut them just shorter than the height of the ...


2

Unless height is an issue, why limit yourself to a 6" deep timber? It's the height that's going to give the beam its rigidity. Why not look at an 8" or 9" deep floor joists? We use 9" x 2" and even 9" x 3" floor joists all the time. Although, the last bridge we made (over a stream to a rough old fishing pond so aesthetics wasn't an issue) we used 'open ...


2

Here is the answer to my actual question: http://awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc Edit: Sorry if I'm not on the same wavelengths as anyone else. I already know about insurance and inspectors, and that was not at all what I was asking about. I just wanted to know what length of wood would span a certain distance given various ...


2

"Is it paint or stain?"- neither, that fence is made of plastic. It is manufactured that color. "Can cedar be prepared to look like it?" - the grain uniformity and absence of knots and defects is unrealistic, natural cedar will have natural imperfections. If you choose your lumber carefully you can select pieces that look nicest to you. A high quality ...


1

I had a similar stain on a counter top with a gloss acrylic type finish that appeared to absorb the printing from a plastic shopping bag. I knew from past experience that any kind of strong base solvent (acetone) will quickly dissolve and strip it, and harsh abrasives scratch. Several ordinary household cleaners did nothing. I tried a simple mix of olive ...


1

Use 2x material... it's probably cheaper, stronger, and gives you more surface to screw into. (edit: this was based on the original question -- 'use 1x or 2x material?') 1/2" ply would probably be fine, but I'd suggest you upgrade to at least 5/8" ply (or whatever the horrible version of that is in the box stores -- 19/32"?!?) to skin the exterior. ...


1

If you've removed the stained project material, the vapor will clear out as soon as you allow it to through adequate ventilation. Some slight lingering odor may remain, but it shouldn't be enough to cause health concerns.


1

Since you posted the picture, I can see that the wall is actually normal, and there most-likely are studs in it. The stud finder may be having difficulty finding the studs through the panelling; it takes some skill to use a stud finder, especially with panelling, more especially if the panelling is thick (like 3/4"). But (based on the picture) you appear to ...


1

Stain soaks in and dries to the touch in a fairly short time, though stain isn't a single thing. It's a broad class of products. Perhaps you're actually asking about sealers. There again, there are substantial differences in products, and your local climate play a role. In any case, that would depend on the expected storage duration. I wouldn't expect the ...


1

Yes it's normal to hit pitch pockets in douglas fir. You can remove it by wiping it with mineral spirits but that's only going to clear the surface and more will weep out; you could be fighting it for years. Because of the pitch (among other reasons), doug fir is not the best choice for furniture. If the wood is prepped correctly by sufficient kiln drying it ...


1

Polyurethane is the modern standby product. Water-based is easier to work with, but oil-based is more durable. One coat, steel wool, another coat or two. Keep 'em light to minimize runs.


1

I'd think you could drill a hole of the desired size in a piece of scrap, clamp it where the hole in the scrap is centered on the small hole you're trying to enlarge, then drill the new hole with the hole in the scrap acting as a guide to locate the bit/hole saw.



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