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8

If the wood is prone to splitting, it'll still split when you don't drill pilot holes, impact drill or not.


3

Many solid wood doors are not "solid wood" in the usual sense - they are "Solid particle board" with wood veneer skins. That will not look good when routed. Clear, in focus pictures of the edges and ends would help in diagnosing this .vs. "solid wood, as in a plank, that came from a tree"


2

The first part of your question was addressed well over on woodworking.SE, at this link. For the second part, there are a few reasons that I might not want to do a decorative detail on a piece of wood- 1. The wood and/or project isn't worth the effort, 2. The wood is hard on tools, or 3. The wood is hard on the wood worker. Routing decorative detail can be ...


2

Pre-drilling is not just about wood-splitting. It fundamentally changes the nature of the joint. Take the example of screwing decking to joists. If you were to pre-drill the deck board so the hole was WIDER than the screw but the screw is allowed to bite into the joist. The joint becomes much like a nut-and-bolt where the entire joint is held in place by ...


1

White or yellow PVA (Poly Vinyl Acetate) wood glue (elmers/titebond) and some new wood. Gluing in a few toothpicks is one method; drilling out the hole and gluing in a section of dowel is another.


1

That wire wheel might help if there are nooks and crannys, like fine detail. But I am afraid what you will need is a lot of elbow grease and sandpaper. Starting with coarse and working down to fine, using steel wool and/or wire bushes for the detail work. Good quality chemical strippers are helpful if you are able to cope with the mess/smell/health hazards. ...


1

The reason the hole is drilled is to remove excess material so that when the screw bites in, it does not rip the wood (or whatever) apart. It's simple physics. When the screw does in, if there is no hole, then the wood volume occupied by the shank of the screw is displaced. Where do you think that wood goes? Outer space? Forcing screws into wood using an ...


1

If those refinished stair treads are a common type type of hardwood such as oak, maple or beech you can get 1/4 inch thick plywood with an hardwood veneer on one or both sides. Looks like one sheet of the material would be more than enough to to make your riser skins. Precut the pieces to fit without fastening right away. When you cut them you will want ...


1

Painter's putty would work, but I don't know if it'd be your best option. First of all you'd need a ton of it to fill between every piece of flooring. Also, unless your going to use it after you put the finish on your floor, I'm not sure that the stain or lacquer wouldn't dissolve the putty. Unfortunately, I don't know what would be your best option, but I ...


1

I ended up hiring a professional repair person who works for Steinway to make the repair. He used a polyester filler. The results are very good but not perfect. I will post a picture soon.


1

How many? A regular hand saw will do the job nicely if you don't need 30 of the things. Do two straight cuts, a couple diagonals, and a little work with a wood chisel to finish off the bottom.



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