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7

There are trim screws with very small heads. They come in stainless steel. The trim needs very little support so the small heads are not a structural problem. A woodworker's technique is to use a small sharp gouge (a curved chisel) to lift a small patch of surface from the wood, bend it back, drive a trim screw in the divot created by the gouge, and then ...


3

You can screw a thinner piece of plywood to the wall then glue the oak as a veneer over it. You can actually get very thin veneers of oak that are specifically for this purpose at specialty woodworking stores. Be sure to fill in the screwholes with putty before veneering as the screwholes will telegraph through the veneer over time.


2

I'll try to take your questions one-by-one. You have two easy options for leveling the chalk line. The first would be to use a carpenter's level; you'd measure 34" from the floor at one end of the bench-to-be, then hold a long 2x4 to the studs with one end right at the mark. Lay your level on the top of the 2x4 and tip the 2x4's other (not at a mark) end ...


2

The proper way to do what you want is to First, get a plug cutter of the appropriate size for your fastener, such as one of these Drill the hole(s) for the fasteners. Then, depending on the type of fastener you're using, either counterbore or countersink the fastener hole so the head of the fastener is sufficiently recessed. Set your fasteners. Cut face ...


1

It is inside the house in a controlled environment, the expansion/contraction of the wood should be fairly minimized. Use a flexible adhesive like clear silicone, make sure you get the type that says it cures crystal clear. Put a few nice big dollops and it will hold. Not sure I like the idea of a large unprotected sheet of glass around a couple of 7 year ...


1

Suction cups are used with success in this situation. Search for "glass table suction cups". The cups have a small cylindrical nub that sits in a hole you will have to drill for each cup. You should only need about four. With the suction cups, the table would be secure, would have some (minimal) give when struck, and would be easy to replace.


1

I think your two choices are make the shelf stiffer by making it thicker support the shelf more inventively. An example of the former would be to make the shelf into a T-beam (or use keshlam's suggestion of a torsion box) An example of the latter might be support wires up to the top of the wall or to the ceiling, or a glass-brick pillar, or a wooden ...


1

Your best bet is to first strip the opening with some pine boards that you can screw in place to the studs with whatever fasteners that are feasible and can be countersunk. Make sure these boards are nice and flat and even. Then install the oak finish trim on top the pine using a contact cement. This way you will have no fasteners showing at all.


1

Pocket screws are NEVER adequate for structural support. Something like this bed should be assembled with lags and carriage bolts, or better yet, Simpson brackets. Having said that, the most important joint in this piece is the connection between the bed rails and the posts so you could just use a combination of ship laps and bed bolts at those ...


1

When I built my similar workbench, I let the 2 x 4 around the outside stand 1/4" above the surface of the bench, and then cut a piece of masonite as a replaceable bench top. Masonite with a coat of clear varnish makes a nice surface and I have replaced it 2 or 3 times.


1

Try using oxalic acid - you may be able to buy it at the local hardware store as "wood bleach"; it comes in crystal form to be mixed with water. Pity, though, to take that marvelous color out of sapele! Good thing you didn't buy bloodwood (muninga) or redheart... 8)


1

The maximum load you can place on a relatively slender column such as a table leg is usually dictated by the buckling strength, rather than the compressive strength. The critical load can be calculated using Euler's formula applied to a fixed-free column: Pcr= (pi^2*EI)/(f*Le^2) where E is the modulus of elasticity I is the area moment of inertia ...


1

That's a hard thing to google. I can offer 2 possible approaches: 1.) I think you could do something like these doors with battens: http://www.appletree.me.uk/ledge&%20Brace1.GIF . You would have to turn the battens 90 degrees from the drawing since your facing boards are horizontal. The most important part would be the vertical battens on the left and ...



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