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10

Buy another 2x4 that is straight. If it is for a workbench top you should be buying the best quality you can find which might cost $2 more.


10

You can't figure this out without knowing how many boards your circle will have; once you choose the number of boards, just divide 360 by the number of bevels (one for each end of each board) and that's how far from 90° each end should be. So, if you have 4 boards (a square): 4 * 2 = 8 bevelled ends 360° / 8 = 45° each end should have a 45° bevel on it: ...


4

It means sapwood (lighter colored) is permitted in the grading of the board,so it's not guaranteed to be a full-face of "black" walnut (which is the most common walnut to run into that terminology for.) If the's been steamed, the color may not be all that noticeable, since that migrates color into the sapwood from the heartwood - for air dried there is a ...


4

If you can get a rough cut with a Recopicating saw, you can use a handheld power planer to finish the cut and get the right angle. Just attach a scrap piece, cut at the correct angle, to the planer fence.


3

It looks like the answer is "probably not." If this calculator from the American Wood Council is to be believed (and if my assumptions about your materials and load are correct), the max span is about 10ft for a pine 2x6. This table agrees that 10-12ft is the max span for typical grade lumber, at typical spacings, for a 5psf dead load. While your ...


3

I would definitely assume the wall is supporting that beam. Get a structural engineer's advice to be sure, and to find out what your options might be. Solutions often exist, but may not be DIYable... and this is emphatically not something you want to risk getting wrong. For comparison: My contractor was able to open a 15-foot-wide passageway through a ...


2

I think there is some confusion going on, pressure treated lumber for ground contact and yard / deck use is a completely different animal than the pressure treated radiata pine product that is used for trim, fascia, and barge rafters. This material is kiln dried and as a contractor since 1989 and a carpenter since 1978 the pressure treated resawn pine is ...


2

It's not uncommon for a softwood frame built independently of any support structure to have a twist. It's usually resolved when you add your top sheet and anchor the assembly to walls, legs, etc. Gravity helps over time as well. I wouldn't bother taking anything apart unless it's convenient.


2

I agree that for cutting 2 x 4's you absolutely do not want to use a jig saw. While a jig saw is handy to have. As Ed mentioned, you cannot get square cuts and are generally used for thin material and scroll work unless you shell out the money for a professional model with massive power. A compound miter saw is a better choice than a chop saw. I believe ...


1

I use a heat gun rather than chemical strippers. It's easier and usually all old paint can be scraped off. Heat guns do have their own set of special considerations and safety precautions but overall it is a better way IMO. That being said, even if you remove all the old paint it is common to be left with a surface far from perfect. I use exterior grade ...


1

Wow that was a long question! First welcome to the stack exchange , now to try to answer your questions. First if you want to spend just a little $ and do trim and framing Don't get a jig saw! Your cuts will not be square. A chop saw that can tilt can be purchased for a few more $ and it can cut square 2x4's and miter cuts. Chop saws cannot rip lumber and I ...


1

Charcoal (if not burned) is forever, more or less (ask an archeologist if you doubt that.) As such I'd have to doubt that cleaning which does not go so far as to remove the charred surface will help, nor will time and weather do much. Linseed oil would be a reasonable approach for a building exterior, though I'd certainly test that before proceeding.


1

I have very good results filling lock bores and hinge mortises on doors, and latch holes in jambs, using 2 part wood filler. It's polyester resin filler similar to automobile body filler: bonds tightly, easily shaped with "cheese grater" planes and sandpaper, cures hard, will not shrink, can be drilled/screwed into/chiseled, etc. Works great as long as you ...


1

1/8th" Luaun plywood from the big box store and a good chisel should let you cut out very tight fitting patch pieces with some practice. That'll get it into paint shape. For a stain finish, you would have to try to match the grain and color, which would be a bit harder.


1

A handsaw will do the job and is the cheapest tool that will if you need to buy something for this. A sharp ripsaw would be best - the coarser side of the low-end pull saws is probably the easiest way to find one of those in the current market.


1

[planer fence 1You will have to get creative with the fence. I have added a few pics to help. You will want to use a much shorter piece to ride along the flat part of the header and you will have a little part on the ends that will need to be finished by hand. The pics were done very quickly and are just to give you the idea.


1

I believe you should contact a licensed exterminator. My experience with hard to reach burrowing insects or worms was dealt with by an exterminator who has access to products we do not. For example we have had problems with carpenter bees which travelled long distances through the beams. With a puff of some powder" which the creature carries back to the ...


1

I'm not sure what preservative-treated means. [Edit: lower in the page it specifically reads "pressure-treated".] Around here, pressure-treated lumber is soaking wet and not suitable for stain/sealer until it's dried at least an entire season. If it's truly kiln-dried, you're free to apply a stain/sealer at any time. To preserve color and prevent surface ...



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