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7

Most mills do not produce and sell treated wood rated for contact with the ground, so any wood in your deck that will be in contact with the ground should be treated, and gotten wherever it is to be got. Buying wood from a mill is often cheaper, though it is not always. A smaller operation with a smaller economic influence (like most mills open to the ...


6

There's no way to answer this (what will the shelf hold, weight-wise) without knowing what your garage ceiling joists are, if they are part of a truss or just joists, how long the span is, and really, what they were designed to hold up in the first place - many garage ceiling joists are barely in spec to hold drywall, much less a load... A FAR better ...


3

First you need to decide if you want one drill to do everything. It isn't always the best choice but it can be a good choice if drilling into brick or concrete is rare. Functional types Drill Driver - should include separate settings for drilling and driving. There will be a variable torque setting that avoids tearing the heads of screws. Combi Drill - ...


3

If you want the boards to look brand spanking new again, you will want to go with method one. I'd use a heat gun to do it, and not the harsh chemical strippers. Either method takes about as long as the other and the heat gun method is less toxic, and, you either already have a heat gun and don't need to spend money, or you'll buy one and have it for a long ...


2

If this is for studwork, i.e. constructing internal wood-framed walls, doorways etc, a 22" 7tpi saw should be suitable. You would use a finer-toothed saw if you need a better finish with less tear-out/splintering, or if cross-cutting very narrow pieces. Unless you are sawing large logs, the saw should be ok for a variety of uses.


2

This may be a good question for the new woodworking forum, since it is furniture related. What you have there is good enough to support a small playhouse or shed, definitely good for mattresses and occupants. Your main concern will be the side to side stresses, the fastening of the posts to the sides, and what it would take to make a "quiet" joint. I am ...


1

You could try a steam iron over a linen cloth it works on dents on solid wood. I appears on the picture your dent might be a break in the wood. Give the steam a try.


1

The 45 miter will be your best bet into the corner. Aside from that, please do consider where you want your joints carefully. I would keep them separated as much as possible, yet not in an area where I am going to work at, unless, you are going to sand and finish the top in place and you are certain that you can get the joint relatively flat and smooth. In ...


1

The pressure treated material will need to set unpainted for about 6 months. Not only is it excessively wet from the treatment process, it will leach some of the treatment through the surface for a time. In essence giving no surface the primer or paint to grip on. There may be water based stains that will work, but no opaque paints, especially oil based. ...


1

You can get vinyl sheets really cheap especially if you don't care how they look. I have picked up a decent sized sheet for $20 on craigslist. Your other option is polyurethane. 2-3 coats will give you a decent barrier for the water.


1

Under no circumstances wooden columns should be placed on the ground. Connection between ground and column should be small metal element like this: It would be best if you could make small concrete foundation which would be connected with this metal element with some anchor bolts


1

I got a huge stain on my hardwood floors from a plastic shopping bag. I sprayed Green Works all purpose cleaner on the stain then read this post. I was about to make the mayo and baking soda mixture so I decided to wipe up the all purpose cleaner and the stain came right off. The cleaner sat on the stain for 3-4 minutes. My wood looks perfectly fine and ...


1

On the risers (the vertical part between treads) you can see a faint shadow of the same pattern. It looks like maybe there was once a "stair runner"; a strip of carpet or other material that ran down the middle of the stairway. Sand more, try wood bleach (oxalic acid) as suggested, then use a darker stain to blend. Finish off with varnish.



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