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1

I recently put in a set of hardwood (oak) stairs and finished with a water based stain and water based coating (several coats until I liked the look). We have thousands of trips up and down and there is absolutely no visible wear. Not to say there won't be BUT it is impressive so far that there is no wear. Three dogs up and down with us most trips too!


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Tried staining and sanding on a sample piece. It didn't come out as expected. There was very little difference between the engraved and the un-engraved portions. So , I decided to redo this with a plaque made of basswood instead of pine. This worked perfectly. The laser burnt the wood just right to provide a distinct contrast with the un-engraved regions.


3

Use a sanding block (ie, do not hand sand with your fingers) which will prevent the sandpaper from pressing into the grooves. 1 mm is huge, for anything reasonably described as fine sandpaper and not applied with excess enthusiasm. But, as is always the case, testing your complete proposed finishing process on a suitable piece of (in this case) ...


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What about filling the engraved area with a darker material, either colored wood filler or dark epoxy, scraping level before it hardens, and after it sets, just a very light sanding to remove any residual on the rest of the surface?


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It's impossible to say for sure from your picture since it is already stained. But generally speaking the approach to this is trial and error with scrap pieces. You'll want to make sure the piece of totally dry before comparing the colour and it can look quite a bit different when wet. It's unlikely you will get an exact match even using the exact same ...



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