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7

When you apply multiple coats of urethane, any dust or small flaws will be amplified with each new coat. If you want the smoothest finish possible, then wait until it is dry, very lightly sand with very fine paper (220 or finer) to remove any dust bumps, wipe it clean with a slightly damp cloth or tact rag, let it dry or buff it dry with a dry cloth, then ...


6

It can be a problem when drying conditions are too fast for the finish to release the bubbles. Here are some strategies to try. Good quality brush, china bristle (boar) for oil Slight thinning (up to 10%). Drying extenders (retarders): Floetrol for latex, Penetrol for oil based paints and stains Don't shake your finish, stir only (to prevent mixing ...


4

I generally spray-finish when I want to have a true satin sheen. I find that it's much easier to manage the application when I'm trying for a Satin finish, even if I'm just using a rattlecan, especially for the final coat. I might just suck with a brush, but I tend to find that I leave either brush strokes, tiny bubbles, or areas of uneven thickness that ...


3

It seems like a new finish of any kind is going to be somewhat at odds with a weathered, distressed look. That said... A water based urethane finish should change the color less than an oil based one, but there will still be a change. A final coat of satin sheen finish over the initial coats might be simpler than the steel wool and less likely to change ...


3

At 100 years old, there's a good chance that the finish on that piano is Shellac. The stuff can get sticky over time. As the linked article points out, the stuff is soluble in alcohol. I've use a cloth soaked in denatured ethanol to swab away sticky spots on a few of my hundred year old oak doors. Doing so gently, not scrubbing so hard so as to remove all ...


2

A trip to the hire shop is in order. One floor sander and an edge sander. A selection of medium and fine grit belts-the hire shop will probably credit you for unused materials. Get all the windows open and wipe the floor over with isopropyl alcohol to remove as much old wax as possible, this will save a lot of clogging of the sanding medium. First sand ...


2

I hate to be critical of other contractors, but from the clues you have given in your question, I think I know what happened. First, pine is a much softer wood than oak and needs to be sanded very smooth before the first coat of urethane. The first coat raises the grain of the pine and almost always is somewhat rough regardless of how good the initial prep ...


2

Yes, by all means. You might want to test a spot (not for "will it work" - it will - but for any possible color issues.) As for what you have read, consider it an opinion, nothing more - if you like what you have, boiled linseed is just fine. Apart from some potential risk to tree nut allergy sufferers, walnut oil also works nicely and is a drying oil. ...


2

All exterior wood finishes that are "suitable for sun exposure" still slowly degrade in the sun (it's worse than water, actually) and need to be renewed - Just ask the folks with wooden boats. So whether or not the current finish is "weather resistant" (since "weather proof" is not really accurate) it will need to be renewed. The simplest approach is to ...


2

UV light is actually probably a bigger concern than water. All but the most delicate finishes will provide decent water resistance, but UV light will break down anything not specifically designed for it. An exterior door should be finished with something outdoor-rated, like spar varnish. I'm not sure there's any way for you to tell by looking at it, but ...


1

Most likely you have spots of contamination such as oil or wax impregnated into the wood. As much as you may not want to hear this, I fear you may need to strip the table top again and sand the surface more completely. When the surface is clean and sanded, you can mist the surface with a little water to see if any areas repel the water. Don't let the water ...


1

As far as I know doors don't have a weather rating - they do have a fire rating and sometimes have a rating for insulation. Since you have a varnish I am assuming you have a wood door. How well it stands up to the weather depends on how well you small porch shelters it, the outer coating, the type of wood, and if it is solid or not. If it is a solid ...


1

As @bib says in his comment, the purpose of the finish is really dependent on what the wood is being used for. Most wood finishes will provided at least a little protection from drying and abrasion, but other than that it's really application specific. (By the way you use the word "varnish", which is a specific category of wood finishes, but there are many ...


1

Generally speaking, varnish makes the wood look pretty and shiny and protects it from water although the protection is not perfect. A much better explanation can be found in the book Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner. It has been through several editions so your local public library should have a copy. He debunks a lot of myths and is pretty ...


1

There are a number of solvents out there that will remove that with no more effort than applying it to the spot. I use lacquer thinner for many problem spots, Goof-off may work, Goo-be-gone, things of that nature that will not even begin to harm the stainless steel. Do not use a steel wool pad!!!! Or anything of that nature, a solvent will do it. To try ...


1

Actually, 'Pumpkin pine' IS (or can be) a natural, aged color of pine. Painting is the easiest recourse. Formby's or similar 'refinisher' will strip wood (of varnishes) and leave some patina, after which, a wood bleach (an oxalic acid based, like Savogran wood bleach) would be called for. Then, sand and coat with a u/v blocking clear finish. Repeat in ...


1

One answer points out the gold standard - inserting a plug or patch of exactly matching wood. YES. (But hard.) Several answers point out using fillers stained to come as close as possible to match the wood. (Practical, but usually far from invisible.) A major problem is the grain. One solution is to fill and stain as close as possible. Then tease up the ...


1

Pre finish: Filling with sawdust and carpenters glue (PVA) is the standard. It has the drawback of not accepting stain evenly. Hardening putties can be blended for color match (don't fully blend them for a more natural look). I doubt either technique will look good under an oil finish. A film finish (varnish, urethanes) would look better. Post Finish: ...


1

If you are cleaning something that can be washed, you can neutralize the pH with water. After using HCl on bricks, I would just hose them off. The acid will become very dilute quickly. pH just measures the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution, so if you add a bunch of water (neutral pH) the pH will approach neutral. I also don't think you need to ...


1

I, too, would be leery of making too nice a table to work on. I recommend a layer of Masonite for a top. It is cheap, takes paint well, and easy to replace when you spill glue or paint on it. Truth be told this is my plan, but I haven't quite gotten there. My workbench is covered by cardboard. Too busy working to make a workspace.


1

Glossy or not, a smooth finish feels wonderful and protects better. Especially on something as abused as a table top. If those dust nibs you didn't sand out get knocked or scratched out at some point, it may result in a hole all the way down to the bare wood. Once moisture enters such a hole, well... you obviously have problems. Assuming that convinces ...



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