New answers tagged

0

If the breaker pops when you turn on a specific burner, even if the cartridge is not plugged in, chances are that burner control switch has gone bad. The power on those units goes through the four burner controls before going out to the cartridge sockets. I had one that if turned on to any setting, would just run the burner on high. If you can depower the ...


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I do not think running the wire above ground, or under is matter. The most important is to make sure the wire won't get cut or damage by any means. Place the wire under ground is most recommended since it is hidden, not get cut, safe but if it is mandated. I have the timer in the garage, the valves are in two zones, one on the back of house, other are on the ...


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That outlet protrusion may very well be one of these adapter units plugged into a normal single wide electrical outlet. Here are representative examples of what I am talking about. A center screw typically goes into the original outlet cover screw hole to hold the adapter against the wall. If it is one of these and you do not like the protrusion just ...


2

From what I can see in the fuzzy pic, someone wanted a double-gang outlet where there was a single-gang box. They apparently didn't want to cut the wall at all. There's probably no concern as far as safety, but pop an outlet tester into it to be sure.


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The wire on the pump is not rated to be exposed or cord connected. You will need to mount the pump inside an enclosure such as a Hoffman box or equivalent. Then you can terminate a raceway or cable to the enclosure and the wiring will be protected inside. Since RV's are covered by the National Electrical Code, this will satisfy the NEC. Good luck!


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If all the breakers on every other row go out, you lost one of your phases. That's not as bad as losing a neutral, in which case each 120V leg can go as high as 240V, blowing stuff up and starting fires. All that to say, if it proves to be a wire connection problem, check your neutral too! If both breakers in a single row go out, you may have a burned up ...


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I think the point here should be never take electrical advice from a General Contractor. Get your advice from an experienced electrician. There is absolutely no reason to replace all the wiring in the house. Upgrading or moving the service does not require a complete re-wire. Fire is about the only thing that requires a re-wire. If you want to keep the ...


1

Yes. I fit steel junction boxes in places the old wires can reach. Then run EMT conduit between the panel and those boxes. No more than 3 circuits (MWBC counts as 1) in each conduit and use 3/4" conduit, for easy pulling and future expansion. NEC limits each conduit run to 9 conductors (4 circuits: grounds and MWBC neutrals do not count) unless you upsize ...


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The + is yellow, and the- is blue in your case (technically common, or C). The dog could have blown the fuse. There is a 3amp fuse on the furnace control board that protects the low voltage side. If you don't get anything to come one, check that fuse.


2

No problem. As long as you install a double pole breaker, make the white wire an ungrounded conductor (including marking as you describe), and change all the receptacles and devices to 240 volt devices.


-1

Your dealing with low voltage AC so you don't have to be concerned with getting the + and - backwards. Assuming the yellow and blue wires connect to the coil on the contactor, you can safely connect the two wires from the house to the two wires in the outdoor unit. Prior to doing any work with the wires, verify you have 1) the power off to the furnace/air ...


3

Wire colors with HVAC wiring are non-standardized, so the colors themselves don't help much. Your furance/air handler should have a control board with terminals labelled R, W, Y, G and C. There should be an existing wire that connects to all of these (though maybe not C) that goes to your thermostat. If anything is different in your setup, please update ...


3

If space permits, you could also run an additional isolated neutral buss bar (connected to the existing neutral bar, and isolated from the box/ground.) My main panel has 3 interconnected ground buss bars (left, top, right - power entry at bottom) to keep it convenient. Small change in the grand scheme of things. Use adequately sized wire for the ...


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My guess about the wire nuts is that a load center is not a junction box. My inspector passed me with the same issue.


2

You can always use larger size wire, however, you may run into a few problems doing so. Terminal size The fist problem you'll have, is that the 6 AWG wire cannot be directly terminated at the new 20 ampere breaker. 20 ampere breakers tend to only accept 14 AWG to 8 AWG wire, though this may vary a bit by brand. To solve this, you're going to have to use ...


6

The AFCI wire needs to connect to the neutral bus. Put it on the other side, or add on to the length of the wire with a wirenut.


2

Unfortunatly, a 20 amp breaker is not rated for #6 wire but you could pigtail the wire with #12. Not very pretty but actually legal by the code. You will then have to pigtail the receptacle with #12 also. Here is the problem, with 3 #6s and a pigtailed receptacle you would need at least 19.5 cubic inches of box space. Even a deep device box is only 18 ...


5

Yes, you can use that circuit to feed an outdoor outlet. However, there are several challenges which depend upon the choices you make. The easiest would be to reuse the yard end cutoff switchbox as a subpanel. That way it can easily accommodate #6 wire. If it was wired as 240 volts with a neutral (white wire besides red, black, and bare or green), it ...


6

Sure, you're always allowed to use oversize wire. You are designating the circuit 20A, you could use anything 12 gauge and up. This is absolutely fine, there is nothing wrong with this, in fact it's a good idea if it's a long run and copper is no object. You just have to contend with physical issues: the outlet (and possibly the breaker) is not listed to ...


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It's not the best idea but it is perfectly legal. Make sure your boxes are all rated to handle the capacity of all the #6 wire in it along with the receptacle(s). This is one of the reasons it is not the best idea, too many issues like box fill to take into account. It may be easier to splice the cable to a length of 12/2 inside and feed that to an outside ...


0

On 3-ways, the two gold terminals are the travelers. The one black by itself is a "hot" if you will. On one switch, this hot needs to be attached to power. The other will go to the light hot (black) wire. In your switch box, it looks like what was your neutral is not used. The circuit neutral is picked up in the light box. You need to get that neutral to ...


0

Sound like you need to replace the pipe supports with J-hooks and either zip-ties or Velcro straps. Here is an example of a J-hook. Notice the rounded edges to prevent cable sheath damage. These supports are required for structured cabling (Cat5) bundles to prevent wire distortion and damage. But would also work well for your application.


2

There are basically two types of wire tracer: audible frequency transmitter and receiver often used with telephone wires to detect them in floors, walls, etc. It is expected the receiver can be placed within a few inches of where the traced wire potentially is. low frequency RF (400–500 kHz) intended for detecting buried wires or inside structures ...


0

Most likely a loose or corroded neutral connection. Normally neural has zero volts to a couple of volts on it, as it is just the power return for the "Hot" wire. Check for loose wire nuts, or a junction where one wire is aluminum and the other is copper. There is still aluminum wire out there and should be replaced with copper if possible, as copper and ...


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you probably have the dip switches set differently in the transmitter compared to the receiver. you just need to open the receiver housing, check the switches and make sure they are set the same in the transmitter (assuming same model, frequency, etc is correct)


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Without being able to test and troubleshoot your coils it is difficult to say but it appears your coils are two 120 volt coils with a center common to both coils. The white wire marked "Com". You would need to take a voltage reading on the two outside terminals of the coils to see if you get 240 volts. If that is the case, then a two wire heating element ...


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Wire nut all black wires.use meter. It's safer than letting them stay open and hot. To be honest I'd check the rest of ur sockets. The arc flash burns in box is a dangerous sign


2

The simplest thing to do is to turn the breaker on and figure out which black wire is supplying the current. (This is arguably one of the more dangerous approaches, but it is safe if you follow precautions like have someone guarding the wires so they are not touched while the power is on.) Use a multimeter and test the voltage between the ground wire and ...


1

I am guessing that if you apply a meter you will find that the single black and white on the right address power coming into this switch box, and the wires on the left run to the lights. If so the switch installs between the left black and the right blacks, to interrupt the hot line, the whites are all tied together to provide the neutral connection (as ...


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I think you misunderstand the design of the switch in the circuit. A single pole switch in a circuit just makes or breaks a single wire. When it is off, one of the wires is a hot feed from the main panel and the other goes to the light. When you turn it on, it connects the two together and acts as if the wire was one continuous wire. That is why there is no ...


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"Just to clarify- the wire IS in conduit outside, but for the 6" or so it runs inside the walls, it is just bare wire." Bare naked ground conductor is perfect fine in certain space. The reason the CODE requires the ground conductor to be inside the conduit is for protecting the conductor from being damaged by any mechanical means e.g., gardener weed ...


0

The "Ufer" ground can be used as the grounding electrode at a second building but it does not replace the requirement to run a separate equipment ground to the sub panel. If the two panels are in the same building the second grounding electrode is not required.


2

You have to run a separate grounding conductor between the panels. If the second panel is in another building, you need to install a grounding electrode at that building as well. At least that's how it's done in the US, if you're covered by NEC.


0

It is ok to change it into a ring and add a spur or socket onto this ring. There is nothing in the regs forbidding it however if your outdoor circuit develops a fault your going to loose your heating. It's also advisable to put it onto an RCBO as opposed to RCD


4

The gauge of wire you use depends on: how much voltage drop is acceptable. You can use a voltage drop calculator to estimate this. Voltage drop depends on the voltage, current, length of wire, and resistance of wire (i.e. the wire gauge, material, construction). how much heat is acceptable. This depends partly on the specific application, and also the ...


0

Why not grab some interior standard outlet (120VAC), plug a 3 VDC transformer/converter in, and feed the battery connections directly inside the keypad? That guarantees plenty of power and avoids a rather messy job (installing a mechanical momentary keyswitch).


1

We're on DIY.stackexchange, so the context here is house repair. For architectural wiring, 10 AWG is required by code. However on projects, UL deems 12 gauge acceptable in short runs inside equipment. Check the guidelines. You may want to go higher still if you are going long distances and don't want to lose a lot of your voltage to Ohm's Law. In some ...


1

#10 AWG is code compliant for 30 amp circuits.


0

To hardwire this -- assuming your opener has thge terminals fgor doing so -- you would want either a double-momentary keyswitch, or a housing which takes a lock cylinder and uses its tailpiece to actuate a pair of momentary switches, plus appropriate mounting hardware and wires. The latter gives you more flexibility in picking a cylinder that, eg, matches ...


0

From your description it sounds like you have the intelligence to understand this stuff, but are simply lacking certain nuggets of information. You'll want to read up a lot on "switch loops" and particularly "3-way switches". It will all make sense pretty quickly, then. Oh, and one more thing that's a bit harder to uncover: In America, wire colors do ...


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Just because a wire is white doesn't mean it is being used as a neutral especially in an old house. ( I can't tell exactly from your pictures but in the top picture if you have a black, red, and white all attached to a switch then the white wire is most likely a traveler not a neutral. It should be re-identified black, red, or blue.) 3 wire cable in ...


-2

Call a licensed electrician. How GFCI's work... https://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/118853/099.pdf


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The original question seems to suggest one leg is not connected. But the comments clarify that 240 volt appliances still work. This happened so long ago, the OP must have identified the cause by now. But I would open the panel and see if all the buses are connected. If half don't work, then the connection from the main breaker to one of the sides must be ...


0

2011 code has nothing on the subject. However it is clear the purpose of the rules therein is to keep you from draping cords across sinks. That seems like a very good idea. Code requires outlets anywhere there's a 12" or wider section of countertop - because that space will inevitably draw a coffeemaker or George Foreman. It's possible the inspector is ...


2

You don't have a 30 amp circuit. Your wire is 12 gauge, so you have a 20 amp circuit with the wrong breaker. Replace the breaker with 20A Feel free to install your 15 or 20 amp GFCI since they are legal on 20A circuits For that matter, you could just install a GFCI breaker. Price both ways. Gadgets which run on 120V/30A are almost nonexistent. Nobody ...


0

In addition to Tester's answer, the 12 gauge wire you have on a 30 amp breaker is a code violation. You should change the breaker to a 20 amp breaker. 12 gauge wire is not rated for a 30 amp breaker.


2

No. You cannot install a 20 ampere receptacle on a 30 ampere circuit. Section 210.21(B)(3) of the National Electrical Code, says that a receptacle on a 30 ampere branch circuit with multiple outlets must be rated for 30 amperes. Therefore, installing a 20 ampere receptacle would be a violation. If you think about this, it makes complete sense. If the ...


4

Neutral and ground should only be bonded at the service equipment. This could be at the service drop, the meter, or the service disconnect (250.24(A)(1)). Looks like the neutral is bonded in your main panel, via the bonding screw. The second panel is then fed using four wires, to keep ground and neutral separate.


2

This is a "lost neutral" and it is very dangerous and should be dealt with swiftly. Your house has 240V power with "neutral" in the middle. That gives you two sides. The neutral from the transformer forces each side to be 120V. What if it didn't? Then each side would be "whatever" in voltage! (but they would add up to 240V.) That is happening. The ...


4

Sounds like you might have a bad neutral. Contact the utility, and have them check it. This is a dangerous situation, that need immediate attention. Voltage swings can wreak havoc on sensitive electronics, so you may want to use UPS to protect them.



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