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0

I don't have an answer but a question. I have the same situation. I am thinking of getting rid of the double switch and just putting in a toggle/on-off switch, thus eliminating the red wire altogether and not having it "hot". Will this work?


1

@AndyMcKenna No, the way you have the switches wired will not work correctly. If you look at your new switches there should have 3 terminal screws. There should be two copper looking screw(traveler wires), setting across from one another, and one dark screw(power in and power to the fixture) at the bottom of the switch by itself. Warning: You'll be ...


2

If there's no current to the fixture or switch, then the fault is upstream. The fact that it was flickering indicates a failing connection, possibly arcing somewhere, which can be a fire hazard. You should check all the junctions on this circuit from the switch back to the breaker until you locate one with a good hot, neutral, and ground connection. And then ...


3

If you have single phase 240V power, you connect hot to screws 1, 2 and 3. Neutral to screws 4 and 5. That is what the diagram is showing. And of course, ground to the ground screw.


1

PROBLEM RESOLVED! #5 was a switch connection from the timer. #1 was porch lights. #2 was main feed. #3 was living room outlets and #4 was no longer used


3

As suggested by Speedy Petey, I poked around further into the back of the wall box and it turns out there was in fact, some white wire. This gave me what I needed to match the diagrams on the Insteon sheet, the unit is now connected as diagrammed and functioning as intended.


2

On your switch that you bought the Black is the Line (Power coming in), the Red is the Load (Power to the Light), the White (which you do not have) is the Neutral and the bare copper wire is the ground. Insteon used to sale a 2-wire kit but the product is now unavailable. You are going to need to get neutral down to light switch(12/3 Romex) or look at ...


1

There is no way to tell what to connect to. It depends on how they wired it. I think it is safe to assume you should connect to the single black since it is in that box by itself like that. And yes, you would connect to the white and green with the other two wires. The instructions are not sparse, they show what you need to connect to. They do not know or ...


1

If photo #4 is the place you want to install the new light than wire the white wire from the new light to the two white wires and the black wire from the light to the single black wire. First attach the ground from the new light.


3

You'll have to leave at least one receptacle controlled by the switches, or you'd be violating 210.70(A)(1). National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits 210.70 Lighting Outlets Required. (A) Dwelling Units. (1) Habitable Rooms. At least one wall switch controlled lighting outlet shall ...


2

No, conduit is NOT required in attics. Not unless conduit is required in your area. There are other factors involved in wiring in attic spaces, but your question is a bit too vague to go into that.


1

You only have to put the wiring in conduit, if you have to protect it from physical damage. i.e. If you're pulling individual wires, or cables are run in such a way that protection is required. Without knowing what type of cable/wire you're installing, it's difficult to be more specific.


6

There's no problem connecting a bigger conductor, as long as the circuit breaker protects the smallest conductor in the circuit. In fact, that big wire will reduce voltage drop over that 100 foot run. Actually, it's 100 feet, plus the length of whatever wiring you run to the outlet and lights, plus the length of whatever extension cord(s) you plug into the ...


4

There's no problem using larger conductors in a circuit, other than it might be confusing to anybody that comes along later. You'd also be wasting money, if you're buying the larger cable.


0

There should be no problem running 4 ceiling fans on a single 15 ampere circuit, though it will depend on what else is on the circuit. Say a 52" fan is 90-100 watts (at high speed), plus three 60 watt bulbs. That puts each fixture at 280 watts or so. Which means four of them, would be 1120 watts. A 120 volt 15 ampere circuit, can supply 1880 watts (120 ...


1

There should be no problem running 3 ceiling fans on a single 15 ampere circuit, though it will depend on what else is on the circuit. Say a 52" fan is 90-100 watts (at high speed), plus three 60 watt bulbs. That puts each fixture at 280 watts or so. Which means three of them, would be 840 watts. A 120 volt 15 ampere circuit, can supply 1880 watts (120 ...


0

At my house, I was fortunate to have an exterior outlet, directly below where I wanted to mount my camera. I tapped into that outlet with a Romex cable, and ran it up the inside of the wall. I cut a large hole, and mounted a 3-gang electical box, and ran the Romex into it. I wire the Romex to a small DC power supply. I mounted the camera to a 3-gang ...


-3

You could wire a 20 amp breaker into the adapter. Something along these lines would be perfect. Easy to reset as well.


1

If you tap into the existing light box: Yes There you will have the switched power and neutral. If you try to tap into the triplex running from one of the switches: NO. There you will only have the travelers and a power.


4

It sounds like there's an ungrounded (hot) conductor shorted to ground somewhere. Finding the short is likely going to be a tedious task. Check your work Did you install grommets or clamps, where the wiring passed through knockout holes in boxes? If not, start by inspecting the wiring where it passes through the knockouts. The edges of these holes ...


2

You can use nonmetallic sheathed cable in basements, as long as you follow a few rules. If you're using 12 AWG cable, and you're installing the cable at angles to the joists. You'll have to pull the cable through bored holes, or along running boards. You cannot staple the cable along the bottom of the joist. When you come down the wall, you'll have to ...


3

1) Yes, your interpretation of the layout and markings seems to be correct. 2) No, it's not a problem, it's a very typical setup. You can have breakers totalling more than the total capacity of the unit, on the ground that you are unlikely to be running each circuit at or near capacity at the same time. A MCB (or RCD, fuse, etc) is designed (and sized) to ...


2

If you're measuring voltage by touching your probes to the terminals on a single 3-way switch, you're not accomplishing much. Your readings will come out as follows. From common to the closed traveler terminal, you'll read 0 volts. This is because common is electrically connected to this terminal, so they're at the same voltage potential. From common to ...


1

Usually red is switched, black is hot, white is neutral. However, you should verify this with either a test light or a multimeter ($5). So the easy way to do this is to connect white to white, red to black, and see what happens when you flip the switch. However, red might be a second circuit or part of a three way switch -- there's no easy way to tell ...


1

Updated solution per comment: The fire alarm should not be connected to a switch at all. It's likely that it is connected to the same switch as the light but with the wires reversed. The solution would be to remove the fire alarm black & white wires from the switch and splice them in the box to the cable that feeds the switch, but before it "hits" the ...


0

I encountered a similar issue, except that the root cause may have been the 3M radio stat (wifi enabled) thermostat ran out of batteries... which it uses instead of the input voltage (R) to control the thermostat. The manual says never let it run out of batteries (which seems impossible... bad design). In tracing the issue, I found a light on my furnace/air ...


1

To run it at 120v you'll need to have a 25 or 30A breaker and #10cu wire. Typical would be 10/2 cable. Don't forget everything on the circuit would need to be rated 30a, the breaker can be 25 or 30a.


3

That looks like a doorbell transformer. Those smaller wires should lead to your doorbell chime unit (assuming you have a doorbell). The junction box is there simply to provide power to the doorbell transformer. From the picture it looks like you have 12/3 and 14/2 in that box, but it is difficult to tell. How confident are you the larger wires are larger ...


0

Sir, replace the whole solenoid. they twist right off. Be sure to turn the main water value off. Once the solenoid is off go to Home depot with it and tell customer rep there you need a replacement solenoid. It will be in the irrigation department isle 26 where I live. LOL.


-3

Green to copper and green Red and black to blue and black White to white


4

No, you should not do this. Grounding wires must be kept separate from conducting wires in all cases. First, check if the circuit you are trying to extend is truly ungrounded. Does it use metal-clad cable and metal electrical boxes like this? If it does, the metal jacket may provide grounding for the circuit. You can try using a multimeter to measure AC ...


3

Lacking a model number to look up, I would try opening the device near the power cord and see if there is a jumper assembly or instructions for converting to other voltages and phase supplies.


0

If you've never had an outlet melt then you might believe you can use a 15A receptacle on a 20A line. I on the other hand believe if the line is rated at 20A the receptacles should be too. That said, 20A duplex receptacles provide 20A to the fixture, that is, to one or both plugs. If you plug two 12A devices in to the outlet and use them both (i.e. shop vac ...


5

You can't just fix this with wiring. You either need to get 3 phase supplied to your location and wired to the device, or you need a phase converter, such as what these guys sell: http://www.northamericaphaseconverters.com A possible alternative might be to use a VFD, such as this one: ...


0

If I had to guess I would say that the red/white pair go off to a separate (maybe replacement) transformer was added. Kind of like the transformer you often see sitting around in an attic or crawlspace that powers a doorbell. If you meter across those two wires, I'm guessing you will find around 24 volts AC. Such a transformer is usually built into the ...


3

The National Electrical Code defines a Multi-wire branch circuit as follows. Branch Circuit, Multiwire. A branch circuit that consists of two or more ungrounded conductors that have a voltage between them, and a grounded conductor that has equal voltage between it and each ungrounded conductor of the circuit and that is connected to the neutral or ...


3

You need to install a 20 ampere double pole GFCI breaker, instead of two single pole breakers.


1

What is a Multi-wire Branch Circuit? A multi-wire branch circuit is two or more circuits that is served by a a set of hot wires connected to different phases (all with the same voltage between them) and a common neutral wire (all of the hots also have the same voltage with respect to the neutral). This arrangement saves a bit on wire and can also save on ...


0

There isn't a way that you can use a GFCI breaker on this circuit. The way a GFCI works, roughly speaking, is by measuring the current leaving on the hot wire and comparing it to the current returning on the neutral. The two currents should be identical – any difference is indicative of current "escaping" via a different ground path, possibly through a ...


0

Swapping the hot and neutral wires on an appliance creates a risk for a "switched neutral". Typically, appliances switch the hot conductor to turn the appliance on and off. With the neutral switched, motors, elements, and other parts of the appliance may be energized from the hot wire. The external chassis of the appliance should be connected to the ground ...


0

That really depends and I am assuming you are in the USA, but most of it holds for elsewhere too. In order to obtain 230V, you have 3 wires + ground, 2 are 'hot', 1 is neutral. You can switch the two hots around if you have a 230V dryer, not a problem. You cannot switch ground to a non-ground or neutral to a non-neutral. Neutral is generally connected ...


3

Reversing "polarity"* (swapping the hot and grounded/neutral wires) presents no danger to the equipment on an AC circuit. In terms of electrical properties, the conductors are the same. The current switches direction 50 or 60 times each second, and the equipment simply cannot tell the difference between the two conductors. Here's an interesting article in ...


0

I have used flush mount led lights that look like can lights but are installed in a 4 inch electrical box. The trim can't be upgraded is the only downside I have with these.


2

Accessible is a somewhat relative concept. You need to fully remove a recessed fixture from a ceiling to access the connections. This is a bit more difficult than pulling a switch to get at the wires, or even dropping a canopy style fixture, but it does meet the criteria of accessible. But one of the main rationales for the rule seems to be to ensure a ...


0

Part of what Jeff wrote is true, check your local codes, but as a standard direct burial URD #4 would be the way to go. Just remember it has to be 24 inches below grade.


2

In this type of set-up, all load power is controlled by the electronic motion-sensing switch. If you use the mechanical switch to "turn on" the light, the motion sensor will turn it off when no motion is detected (after a certain time period, usually selected by the user/installer). If you look at the wiring instructions for the 3-way motion-sensing in-wall ...


3

To make a true 3-way motion detector switch -- as opposed to a motion detector with a remote, or a motion detector in series with a normal switch -- the motion detector has to be able to monitor whether power is being drawn through either of the travellers and which traveller it is currently connected to. If no power is now flowing, to turn on flip to the ...


1

Easy. Cap off the red at both locations. The remaining black wires at the wall will connect to a standard single pole switch, and the remaining wires in the ceiling will connect to the receiver as directed by the manufactures instructions.


2

Some dimmers use the ground to trickle a small amount of current for normal operation. If yours is working without it connected, I would say it doesn't fall into this category (although you could provide the model name/number to be certain). Most likely the ground connection is there simply because all residential switches, receptacles, etc. require a ...



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