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The first step in any Alarm system should be a question to yourself: what am I trying to do with this alarm? Are you worried about if you at home or away, or both. Once you have decided what your needs are then you can decide what to wire. The most secure system would be windows, doors, motions, glassbreaks all used in conjunction. Run a 22/2 to the ...


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I am a commercial electrician in the US and I'm not very familiar with UK standards or code, but I should be able to help a little. From what I understand, a typical household runs lighting on a 5A fused circuit. Watts = Volts*Amps = 230*5 = 1150 Watts maximum total on the lighting circuit. It the US we us a maximum of 80% of the rated load, which would ...


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to get the needed amp rating for the wiring and fuse you take the wattage of the bulbs divide by the voltage and multiply by number of bulbs. so 15 75W bulbs means 75W/230V*15 ~ 5 amps. this is much less than would need a dedicated circuit. (it's the same as a 1125W appliance).


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Rip the walls open. Unless someone had the sense (they almost certainly did not) to run the network cables in conduit, that's generally the only practical method to replace wires thoughout a house. It's messy and tedious and involves a lot of cleanup. Might be a lot less hassle to check for connector issues first - a 2007 house would almost certainly be ...


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You will need a double pole breaker, or two breakers connected by handle ties for a multi-wire branch circuit. If you're wiring outdoor receptacles, you'll likely want GFCI breakers, instead of AFCI. You should be able to shuffle breakers around in the panel, to accommodate the double pole breaker. All that said. It sounds like you are quite ...


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IMO in a commercial setting all receptacles, switches, jacks & the like should be installed at what is called counter height (about 48" to the top of the box). This not only satisfies ADA laws, but it keeps it all above most furniture, in sight for quick inventory, easy access, easy repair and upgrades. The days of crawling under desks and counters to ...


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Whoever told you the meter was the point of disconnect was dead wrong. The main panel or disconnect is the first means of overcurrent or disconnect. THIS is where your neutral bond must happen. 2011 NEC Article 250 Grounding and Bonding II. System Grounding 250.24 Grounding Service-Supplied Alternating-Current Systems (B) Main ...


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The grounded (neutral) conductor is bonded to ground in one location. It's common to bond the grounded (neutral) bus and the grounding bus in the panel, but it's not a requirement. The grounded (neutral) conductor can be bonded before the panel, but you'd then be required to keep the grounding and grounded (neutral) conductors separate after that point. So ...


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By FAR the best bet for billing questions and complaints is to call your POCO (power company). In my area they take high bill complaints very seriously and will send a representative out quickly. Also, things like this are absolutely NOT grounding/earthing issues. It is possible that it is a neutral problem and the grounding has become part of the issue ...


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What I would do, and I’m not kidding, I would find a large, nearby housing development, where they are currently building homes and pretend I’m interested in buying and have look at some samples. Hopefully the electrical services are in the basements and they’re unfinished. Study how the wires are installed for everything down there sump pump receptacles, ...


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Many switches that need a neutral have equivalent versions from other brands that do not need a neutral. You may be able to find a switch that has the functionality you want without doing additional wiring. While current code requires a neutral at switches, you are allowed to replace existing switches without rewiring if the neutral is not present. If that ...


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I have been planning to install receptacles in my home for 12 volt dc. I decided to use a 15 or 20 amp outlet that is designed for 277 volt, the configuration is nema 7-20R or 7-15R. It looks like a regular 120 volt receptacle but the hot and neutral slots are set at a 45 degree angle so I won't accident plug into 120-240 volt. use the silver terminal for ...


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Or: A completely different approach to the problem. If the compressor is really the only thing driving you to want more power in the garage, and the electrical service in the garage, as it stands, would suit your needs adequately otherwise...move the compressor. Build it a "doghouse" in the yard where you can run a dedicated (and shorter) electrical line ...


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tl;dr - if you are going to all the work, and a subpanel, you presumably want a bit more than 20 amps (think it needs to be 30 amps minimum for code these days, and 60 amps is probably better.) You'll have to dig a ditch. At that point, my opinionated opinion is that you should go ahead and put in conduit, and an additional conduit for any current or future ...


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I wan't able to find installation instructions from any of the major receptacle manufacturers. Though I was able to find this video from Leviton (a major manufacturer of electrical devices, in the United States). The video demonstrates how to install a receptacle (there's also a version on YouTube), and clearly shows the installer using both sets of ...


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Mike quotes the code (300.13B Device Removal) but misunderstands what it means. The paragraph's 1st sentence starts out, "In multiwire branch circuits,". That means where 2 or 3 circuits with 1 shared neutral wire are passing through a box. You'll probably never see this kind of wiring in a home, but if you have 2 or 3 circuits sharing a neutral in the same ...


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The way to learn how to handle high-current circuits (e.g. mains!) is to become an electrician. The people who design and create the sort of home-automation devices you seem to want to build have training and certification in all the relevant areas. That said, if you can find someone who is qualifies and does have experience, they can supervise you whilst ...


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There's these things known as Circuit Breakers, switch them off on the circuit you are working on. Working on live circuits is only for linemen working on the grid and eventually dead DIY people. All it takes is one little slipup and you've bought your halo.


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You got terrible advice. Head to a library, get a book on home repair. Head to a toy store, get an electronics kit for beginners. Experiment for a while. Happy April 1st, if you're celebrating.


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Terminals R and C are a 24V AC power supply, from a transformer on the control board in the furnace. The control board also has relays: one is for the fan, one is for heat. One side of the coils of these relays are connected to the G and W terminals respectively, and the other side is connected to C (one side of that 24V AC power). Your thermostat is ...


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I would: Take a photo Separate out the conductors enough I can get a quality tape over the flaw. Take a photo Wrap it all in tape. Write in sharpie a note on the cable. Show the photos and patch to the inspector. Do what the inspector says (if that's a junction box, then so be it).



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