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1

Position the rack so you can screw into the studs. If that is not practical then mount a sheet of decent thickness plywood onto the wall surface and fasten that to the studs wherever possible. The rack can then mount onto the plywood. If you use a plywood that is 3/4' inch (19 or 20mm) thick then the screws for the rack need not even penetrate the drywall at ...


0

I had some help from a friend and I think I have the mess worked out.


1

In almost every scenario the answer would be no. If the receptacles you are talking about are general use or serving the counter areas in the kitchen then the answer is definitely no.


0

Yes, it does, under 2014 code. You may find outdated articles claiming it does not - they are outdated. 210.8(A)(7) Any 125V 15 or 20 A receptacle within 6 feet of the outside edge of a sink (shortest path) requires GFCI protection Used to have an exception for dwelling kitchens (up to 2011) does not now (2014 forward.) Other than dwellings was required ...


0

Yes, it can use a pigtail as long as the pigtail fits the application you are able to do so.


3

It can use a pigtail, unless it's a GFCI receptacle and you want the light to have GFCI protection.


0

Nest states their thermostats do not require a Common 24 volt leg of control power to be provided to the Nest, However there are some situations where the Nest will not stay charged after a bit thus requiring a Common leg of the 24 volt power sent to it, they allege the Common leg back feeds to the thermostat by unused circuits and it does in many if not ...


0

this turned out to be a bad thermostat. The manufacturer sent me a new one and it works great with the C wire attached. One test they had me do was attach just the C and R wires. When I attached the old thermostat, the fuse blew.


1

Not for many appliances, but for some that are sensitive it could cause problems.


3

Hot1 and Neutral1 are the feed from the panel. Hot2 and Neutral2 feed the next receptacle in the chain. If you connect Hot1 and Neutral1 to the receptacle, this receptacle will work. If you also connect Hot2 and Neutral2 to the receptacle, all the devices downstream will also work. Depending on the new receptacle you're installing, you should wire it ...


1

You will need to install a NEMA 14-50 outlet for your new stove. Connect the black wire to L1, the red wire to L2, the white wire to N, and the copper wire to G, then plug your stove in.


1

Take the 3-wire cord off of your old dryer and use it. When you look at it, it should be flat with the three wires. These should line up with the three main connectors on your new dryer. Put the center one into the center connector, while the other two can go to either side. Make sure everything is snug. Have no fear as this is done all of the time. Your ...


0

Your tester shows you 120V from Hot1 to Hot2? What country are you in? Are you sure you're not reading 240V (more or less) between Hot1 and Hot2? If you do not have an independent (typically bare copper) ground wire in the box, and the ground terminals on your receptacles are just pig-tailed to the neutrals, then you should either disconnect the pigtail ...


0

First, the 14/2 wire will need to be upgraded to 12/2 wire or you need to downgrade the breaker to 15 amps to protect that section 14/2 wire from possibly overheating/causing a fire. The vanity typically does not need to be on the GFCI but if the light/exhaust fan is close enough to the shower/tub that you can touch it (if you are not tall enough, image if ...


0

Sounds like you used a double throw switch and connected the lights to two different terminals on the switch. You need to connect the positive wires for the LED strip to the same terminal on the switch.


2

Does this all sound right and I should just not worry about it? If it is causing you concern, you could pay another electrician for a second opinion. I wouldn't bother but you may feel it worthwhile. do I need to start tearing down walls to figure out where the cut wire came from? If you must know where the wire leads to, that might eventually be ...


4

From your diagram it looks like the grounded (neutral) conductor connected to the light (that trips the GFCI), does not come from the GFCI device. It looks like the grounded (neutral) wire is coming from the feeder to the circuit, instead. Because of this, you'll have current flow through the GFCI device on the ungrounded (hot) conductor that does not ...


-1

You should never do a home security system yourself. Hire a professional that has been in the business a while. It's not that expensive for the most part. Unless you know specifications on mounting height on motions and how a glass break works, what frequency to set it to etc, you are really setting yourself up for false alarms, which can add up. In ...


6

No it is not safe. A 15 ampere rated receptacle should not be installed on a circuit protected by a 30 ampere breaker. You should not be plugging devices that draw more than 15 amperes, into a 15 ampere rated receptacle. The receptacle in your photo is a 20 ampere receptacle, so you shouldn't have a problem plugging in a 20 ampere device. They make ...


1

There is NO neutral in a NEMA L6-?? circuit. That is a straight 240V circuit/receptacle. I have no idea what an "L609" is. There is no such NEMA number, but you CANNOT simply run a loose or separate neutral for this circuit. It MUST be run with the circuit conductors in the same cable or conduit/raceway. It must also be correctly sized based on the required ...


3

I can't speak to code directly, but generally things like pumps are placed on non-switched circuits to prevent someone from accidentally turning off the pump and then flooding the house. Imagine a scenario where someone is trying to figure out what the switch does because they can't/won't follow the cable. They flip the switch a few times and nothing ...


0

This was something the builder just did (I wouldn't even call it convenience/cost, for that matter). We start with 210.52(B)(1): (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all ...


1

I'm guessing it's the opposite (or same) reason as this question. Some libraries have a listing room, you could try that but I don't think it's going to work. You have to be 'getting ready for bedtime'. Until your brain shuts down enough, it strains to adapt its sensitivity to the room level. I'd say this happens to everyone, except I'm biased as a ...


0

The reason that wiring devices have grounding connections that accept only one wire is that otherwise, if two ground wires were connected to the device, then if someone later removed that wiring device and then re-applied power without wire-nutting the grounding conductors, there would be a break in the ground path for the downstream wiring but perhaps not ...


0

This is an unfortunately-all-too-common wiring error, even without a 12/2/2 cable to further confuse things. Most folks (even electricians) think "I'll just nut the neutrals together" since that's what works when everything in a box comes from one branch circuit, which is the case 99.9% of the time -- in the 0.1% case, such as yours, though -- this rule ...


1

I determined that my power source was no good. I don't know exactly what is going on, but it seems to be coming from a switched outlet system in another part of the house. Easiest solution, tie up the old power source and find a different one that is cleaner. I found another circuit nearby that was barely used and is actually more spatially related to ...


1

Similar type devices are used in homes of folks suffering from Alzheimer's or Dementia. This Caring Home.org has reviews of a few such devices. Cookstop review Cookstop site HomeSense review HomeSense site Stove Guard Stove Guard site Most of the devices are easy to install, requiring only a screwdriver for installation. I do not personally ...


0

A very quick search on ebay found me this 30 amp timer: http://www.ebay.com/itm/DIGITAL-TIMER-SWITCH-24-HOURS-7-DAYS-17-EVENTS-30-AMP-OUTPUT-fr-POOL-SPA-HOT-TUB-/111390645188?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19ef665bc4


1

You may not be able to find a timer that's designed to directly switch that much, but you can find a timer that switches a lot less, and use it to switch the coil of a relay that can switch whatever load you require. Relay coils take very little power to switch, and relay contacts can be had as large as you could possible need, or larger. However, if you ...


0

Someone I know brought an old, working fridge from an old house to a new flat, where it would frequently trip the circuit breaker. The electrician said that this is fairly common with old fridges and modern (i.e. switched rather than a fuse wire) circuit breakers. There are simpler switched circuit breakers (e.g. without ground leak detection?) that might ...


2

This can be done using a multi-way fan/light controller system such as the Lutron Maestro series. You (or your electrician) will need a MA-LFQM package, which includes the master wall module and the canopy module, and two MA-ALFQ35 accessory controls, as well as normal wiring supplies (two and three conductor cable of the appropriate gauge, wire ...


0

You do need the RPLS530A from the second link you gave for your application -- the unit comes with wiring instructions, but in short, connect the wires labeled C and 2 to the power coming in from the line, and the wire labeled 1 to the wire going out to the load (provided you're replacing a single pole switch, i.e. one with two brass screws and one green ...


0

I'm not sure exactly what's going on with the wiring, since in the one photo there's a giant ball of wires and cables, and in another there's extra wires hooked up. Here's what I see in the photos you've posted. In this photo, you'll notice the cable with a red and white wire. That cable should go between the furnace and the A/C unit. The white wire from ...


0

You are correct in that the RPLS740B is not directly compatible with a three-way circuit; however, since this timer uses a neutral wire for its return instead of returning via the load, you can use it to drive a SPDT relay that replaces one of the three-way switches. Another option, of course, would be to take your existing timer back and install a RPLS540A ...


1

No. The device you have requires a grounded (neutral) conductor to be connected to function. There's no other way to hook it up. I believe Honeywell offers timers that don't require a grounded (neutral) connection. You might want to purchase one of those instead.


0

GFCI Protection of Switch and Receptacle If you want to provide GFCI protection to the entire combination device (both switch and receptacle), you'll want to provide a single feed from the load side of the GFCI to the device. Connect a short bit of black wire to the brass colored LOAD terminal on the GFCI. Connect the other end of that black wire to ...


2

I don't know your "switch/outlet" combination in detail, but I'd guess there might be a connection by default (ie, the switch is tied to the outlet unless you break a tab) that's getting upset by the switch being fed from the line side and the outlet being fed from the load side of the GFCI. In any case, the disposal probably ought to be connected to the ...


1

You need more than a "transformer" - you require a DC power supply for most bare LEDs. A transformer is only part of such a supply. If you are running the LEDs in parallel, resistors are essential - otherwise one unit will end up with "more of the current" and die from it. LEDs are very sensitive to and require precise control of current - the voltage can ...


0

You could rewire it with stranded wire pigtails, this would add flexibility and relieve stress.


1

Unless the specific device requires it, there's no requirement to use the back wire terminals. It's simply a personal preference to do it that way. If you're having trouble using the back wire terminals, it's probably safer for you to not use them (unless of course the device requires it). You'll also want to check the markings on the device, and read ...


3

I'm going to leave minimal for someone else and answer smart.... Put the lights on their own 15A breaker. Put receptacles on a couple of 20 amp breakers. If you MUST share (or think you must) put half the lights and some receptacles on one circuit (probably 15 amp unless you really want to run 12 gauge to lights) and half the lights and some other ...


2

I'd have to suspect that you are perhaps not always getting the part where the wire actually ends up between the plates right - to Quote @shirlocks answer "Just be sure to tip the device so the grab plates open before inserting the wires." If the wires are in the right place and the screws are tight THIS flavor of back wiring is VERY secure (as distinct from ...


3

It can be and frequently is replaced piecemeal, but I'd certainly be in favor of wholesale replacement if it were my house. If we accept "1880s-1930s" as the range of its general use (wikipedia, not any particularly great research effort) it's 80-130 years old. And any impact it's having on your insurance rates won't end until it's all gone. Plus, you ...


1

Sure, within limits - it may depend where the GFCI is and where in the world you are - if the prevailing electrical code requires a circuit dedicated to one room, and you extend it beyond that room, you would be violating code. Other than THAT, yes, it's certainly possible - connect from the LOAD terminals on the GFCI to the first outlet, from the first ...


1

In general, yes. GFCI outlets have LINE and LOAD terminals. You can connect several more outlets on the LOAD terminals, and they will also be protected from ground faults. You can also add a switch, though bear in mind that highly inductive loads (like a large motor) can cause nuisance tripping of the GFCI.


2

There's no problem installing the fan without a switch. In many cases folks replace a switched ceiling light fixture with a fan, so the fan uses the switch that used to control the light. In other cases the ceiling is too high, so controlling the fan via the pull chain is inconvenient. If you install the fan without a switch, you could always add a ...


-3

You can use 8awg on 50amps. Refer to NEC 310.15 (B) (16)) Personally I use 6awg, but it can be done


2

Of the options you are considering, I'd think option 2 makes more sense, and 4-5 feet of conduit - in most cases the conduit will just be continuous from the junction box right through the wall, no particular fuss "as it enters the house" - Come down the wall, put on an LB, drill a hole in the wall, insert conduit, connect to junction box, connect to LB; ...


3

Yes, you can use 10 AWG copper conductors with a 20 ampere breaker. The smallest size conductors you could use with a 20 ampere breaker, are 12 AWG copper conductors. There's no problem using larger conductors, other than cost to you, and difficulties associated with working with thicker conductors.


0

According to the documentation for the switch you're using, a grounded (neutral) conductor is not required. The wiring diagram for your device looks like this If your device isn't working, it's possible that you've reversed the wires. Make sure the black wire from the switch is connected to the line wire, and the red wire is connected to the load wire. ...



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