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4

It's good that you found this, in the worst case, this situation can lead to an electrical fire. Check Connections First thing to do is turn off the power, and check all the mechanical connections at the switch. If this is aluminum wiring please comment and I'll update the post, as there are other considerations if so. Are there wires doubled up on a ...


0

yes you can over ride the motion with a 3 way sw to work manual or go back in motion. you need a 14/3 and 14/2 going to motion flood hot going to direct motion and red on 14/3 going to light black going to red on motion all naturals together red on common screw of 3 way and hot on same side other screw of common and black of 3 way on other screw


6

Yes, all conductors protected by a 20 ampere circuit breaker must be at least 12 AWG copper. There are a few exceptions and loop holes, but none of them apply to your situation. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 240 Overcurrent Protection 240.4 Protection of Conductors. Conductors, other than flexible ...


1

Yup, I figured it out 10 minutes later. Single red to black from fixture, capped the blacks. All good, thanks!!!


1

A MWBC (multi-wire branch circuit, where two hots share a neutral) incorrectly wired to two single pole breakers, instead of properly using a 2-pole (tied handle) breaker, will only allow you to kill half of that Edison circuit by flipping one switch. You'll have to find its sister and kill that one too. If not, once you disconnect that neutral you can (and ...


0

10/3 copper NM is rated for 30A under the NEC, so the old oven was more than adequately wired, and it will support the new oven without difficulty as well. If you are of the unlucky type to have aluminum wire in your walls -- 10/3 aluminum NM will still handle 25A, so you will be fine. However, the load must be considered as the nameplate load (no demand ...


0

It sounds like a "three way" switch. There are two switches, one lamp and 14-3 cable with 3 conductors and a ground. The switches are wired do both must be on or off for the light to work. This is hard to explain in words. Look up three way switch wiring for examples. And careful, the white wires are hot in this arrangement.


1

You can do it -- you'll need a subpanel loadcenter in a NEMA 3R enclosure, though, as well as watertight conduit/raceway and fittings for the outdoor runs, which will be done using THWN in the conduits. You will want to put a 30A 2pole for the dryer and a 20A GFCI for the laundry outlets, as well as a spare 20A breaker (if you want a lighting circuit there, ...


0

Red should be switched power and you would cap off the black coming from the ceiling.


6

Both the black and red are likely ungrounded (hot) conductors. However, one or both of them are likely switched. That is, one or both of them are energized only when a switch is closed. Test the wires with your meter, and determine which one is controlled by the switch. Once you figure that out, connect only that wire to the black wire on the fixture. ...


-3

You wired the fixture hot to the hot supply AND the switched hot. Hardly surprising that it does not turn off. What the wiring should be is red (switched hot) to fixture black, white to white, and bare to green. The black should be connected wherever it was (or was not, but usually it was) before you rewired the thing - generally going to the switch, and ...


0

I would use 10 gauge wire and run new wire. You could use the old wire, but I would check it carefully for cracks. My experience is that old wire tends to get cracks in the insulation. Since you are replacing the breaker and oven, you may as well run fresh wire.


-1

Call an electrician. Don't kill your self. even if you say never, is there any possibility that you can? consider if before not after.


1

I can't speak to the regulatory side of this, other than to say I'd be very surprised if a custom-built circuit like you're describing would pass an inspection just for the fact that it's a non-UL/CSA approved device on a life safety circuit. Being in a private residence at least will relax the requirements compared to a commercial or multi-tenant building, ...


0

You could also just buy a replacement plug from a hardware store


6

Since it's a plug attached device, is not covered by code. However, you should still be concerned with safety while making the repair. The safest bet here, would be to completely replace the cord. This means locating where the existing cord connects to the couch, removing the old cord, and replacing it with a new one. You'll also want to find a cord that ...


4

Can you elaborate on what you mean by "reverse wired?" If you're saying you want to put the switch at the far end, near the last light,the most straightforward way to do that is to pull power into that switch box, then feed the lights from there (don't feed the lights directly from the panel). Or, I suppose you could pull 3-rope all the way through from ...


1

The standard solution would be to either run power and neutral to the switch and then run switched power and neutral back to the lights, or to run power/neutral to a box, run a "switch loop" from there to the switch and back, and then run switched power and neutral from box to lights. It sounds like you want to do something different ... which may or may ...


0

Not sure what model equipment you're using, but it seems like the new thermostat requires a neutral connection. If this is the case, you'll want to make the connections as follows: At the Thermostat Connect the black wire to the B terminal in your diagram. Connect the white wire to the N or neutral terminal. Connect the red wire to the Heat (and Cool if ...


2

This is OK provided that the wires to the fan control switch are treated as 120VAC wires as per 725.46: Class 1 Circuit Wiring Methods. Class I circuits shall be installed in accordance with Part I of Article 300 and with the wiring methods from the appropriate articles in Chapter 3. (i.e. run using NM and not communications-type cable/wire) and ...


4

Typically you'd run 14/2 to the vanity, and 14/3 to the fan/light combo. In the switch box, Connect all the grounded (neutral) conductors. Connect all the grounding conductors. Connect the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the vanity to the switch. Connect one of the ungrounded (hot) conductors from the light/fan to the switch. Connect the other ...


0

First thing you'll have to do is determine where the wire from the switch is going. I'm guessing that all those lights,fan, and receptacle are just daisy-chained with the switch interrupting the neutral inside a fixture box or separate junction box. (Why, why, why?) If you make the existing switch control only the ceiling fan, you'll of course, need to ...


1

No, you absolutely should NOT connect the grounded (neutral) conductor to the grounding (earth) conductor. If you have two ungrounded ( hot ) conductors, and you only want to use one. You can simply cap the unused conductor using a twist-on wire connector, or similar device. However, when two ungrounded conductors are run, there's almost always a reason. ...


2

To reduce material costs of the job. To reduce the number of holes bored through framing. To reduce the number of cables that have to be pulled.


8

No, that box can absolutely NOT be fixed. There are parts that are physically broken that are not replaceable, aside from that fact that it is generally in poor shape. Plus, I see evidence that that right-hand line side screw has overheated. Even if it could, as Aloysius said, it is really not worth it. Someone, probably a home inspector, will see it and ...


6

Unless you're in a real estate market so hot that people are doing drive-by-buying, just spend a few bucks to get a replacement panel. They're not expensive; labor won't be excessive, and then it won't be an impediment to sale. Even if the existing one was fixed, your potential buyer will be calculating money off to replace it.


2

If the on/off panel was done correctly, and it probably was, it has a main bonding jumper installed. I can't see any reason why you'd want to change that. So, yes; it's a sub-panel and the gounded/ing conductors should not be bonded together in the new one. If you want to verify it you'll have to remove the cover on the present panel.


2

There are (at least) two problems with this, and the solution to both is to change to THWN (or another wet-rated labeled conductor) when you change to conduit. Problem one is that stripped NM is not labeled and not acceptable per code for that reason, as @Speedy Petey said. The second is that you are running to an external location, which means that the ...


-1

i am assuming this is a USA install. once you remove the cable sheath you install it just like single wires if they are properly rated (at least as high as your peak voltage, usually 300 or 600 volts). there is no need to leave parts of the sheath on. if these wires are not rated or are not sufficient then you need to use real THHN singles or install it ...


0

Yes, you need to run a separate neutral wire. No, you may not fake a neutral or a ground by bridging them at your "cabinet".


3

I would recommend cleaning the knockouts first. Sand them completely free of any paint or rust. Then scrape clean the circular groove of the knockout on both sides using a sharp pointed tool like an awl. After doing this, the knockout should come out with a sharp block from a ball peen hammer and screwdriver. If this does not work, the next step would be ...


0

You can use petroleum jelly. It's cheap and easy to find. Or wrap the cables in duct tape, duct tape is sturdy and has good gliding properties. Sex lube will not work because it dries out and is not viscous enough.


4

Lubrication is generally only useful when pulling through conduit. If you are pulling through open walls, usually the issues are obstructions, bends, small holes between framing members, etc. All cables will stretch slightly when you pull them, the goal is to not pull so hard as to wreck the cable. Different cable types tolerate this better than others. ...


1

I can't imagine how hard you pulled the cable to snap one of the wires. I suggest you reinstall the connectors. You probably just missed the conductor while putting them on. If that doesn't work, pull the cable back out and look for any damage. It may have been snagged on a nail or something. Measure out where the damaged point would be in the wall and ...


0

I have worked in the Caribbean on a couple of projects and I feel your pain on getting the right product to do the job, but I have to ask: What are your walls made of? Solid Block? Hollow with Studs? What are you putting the cable in? Conduit? Free Air? How many Cables in the run? 1,2,3 Are you using a pull string of some sort? Everyone wants to use ...


0

They make special lubricants that are used to pull wires and cables. Here's one example. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-Tools-32-oz-Premium-Synthetic-Clear-Lubricant-51028/100660159


4

When someone says soap you have to take in consideration their experience. They may very well mean soap, as it is slippery and would probably work. If, however, they're from the electrical/low voltage field they more likely mean Yellow-77 - or a similar variation available today. A gel-ish type is what you'll likely find at a big-box store. Personally, I ...


2

Where can the problem be? The problem might be that you didn't take into account that neutral is usually tied to ground/earth. In the US this typically occurs at the point the supply enters the building.


1

The white wire (neutral) coming in should be directly connected to the white wire on the lamp. The black wire coming in is the hot line. The toggle switch is used to either break or connect the hot line. The black wire coming in to the lamp should be connected to one of the black wires of the switch. The other black wire from the switch should be connected ...


1

You can use twist-on wire connectors (or other approved connector), to create a "pigtail". Turn off the power. Remove the LOAD side wires from the GFCI. Using a twist-on wire connector, connect the white wire you removed from the GFCI with the white wire feeding your new receptacle and a short bit of the same size wire (6-8" should do). Do the same with ...


0

When wiring a grounded power cord to an appliance: The SMOOTH (right) side is hot = connect to BLACK. The GROOVED (left) side is neutral = connect to WHITE. Sound correct?


0

A GFCI is an automatic device that offers personal protection against lethal electrical shock or electrocution. Three types of GFCIs are commonly used in homes – the GFCI outlet, the GFI circuit breaker and the portable GFCI. All of these GFCIs perform the same function but each has different applications and limitations. More Detail of ...


4

A wire from the receptacle to the box is still no ground at all - the box isnt grounded. You need to either replace the wire all the way back to the electrical panel to make a properly grounded outlet, or replace the outlet with a GFCI, which provides the protection a ground wire would. You are also supposed to label the outlet with a "No Equipment Ground" ...


4

The tip I got from an electrician was to just buy the big boxes; the cost difference is minor, it's easier to work in bigger boxes, and then you don't have to work about it.


3

Every 14 ga. wire entering (or exiting) the box needs 2 cubic inches. Every 12 ga. needs 2.25 cubic inches. All grounds together count as 1 wire, as do internal clamps. Every device (such as a switch or a receptacle on a single strap) counts as double the wire size it connects to. Rough add-up (" standing for cubic inches): One 14/2 cable in (2x2"), two ...


2

Assuming that the S's represent switches to control the lights, here are my thoughts... Generally, you do not want your lighting on the same circuit as outlets in the same room. That way if you trip a breaker with a plugged in device, your lights don't go out. This is especially helpful when trying to do the wiring itself because if the outlets and lights ...


1

As noted, this is not an entry level project. (And drywall is the enemy, but fear not.) Safety notes: turn off circuits that you're messing with. Have a tester that tells you if a wire is hot. Don't assume that wire colors mean anything. If you think there's a chance that you'll hit plumbing/ gas/ other wires/ etc when drilling, then open up the drywall and ...


0

You could (spend money) replace the controller and the switch. Or remove the controller and just wire everything to the fan switch (free). Either way, if the wire is in conduit and you have to pull the fan down, just run another wire.


1

Yes you can, as long as you keep the conductors separated. However, you should likely avoid it if possible. Common practice is to keep power and communications circuits in separate stub bays. National Electrical Code allows you to put power and communication circuits in the same box, as long as all the conductors are separated by a permanent barrier or ...


1

You wouldn't install a GFCI receptacle in each receptacle location, you'd install a single GFCI device at the "beginning" of the circuit. This GFCI device could even be a GFCI breaker, or a GFCI device that doesn't have receptacles on it. If you have split receptacles now (top always hot, bottom switched), you won't be able to simply replace them with a ...



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