New answers tagged

1

You didn't say where you live, but the National Electrical Code applies to most areas of the USA. Check your state and local codes for any modification to this. The NEC is clear on this subject. If the re-bar is not connected by tie wires to the rest of the re-bar and is less than 20 feet long you will need another grounding electrode. It also needs to be ...


1

DVM's have a problem. Unlike traditional voltmeters which use a tiny amount of current from the circuit to move the needle in the meter, DVM's are self-powered and draw essentially no current. If you lay two wires in parallel and energize one, the floating, unattached wire will "pick up" a voltage by induction (well, capacitance). This is useless and ...


1

Never gonna work. Take the dimmer back and get the right thing. It won't be the first one the shop has taken back for that reason. But, know this -- a dimmer switch that works with an old-style 3-way** is a hard problem. The device that can solve it is sophisticated. Basically it has to be able to power itself off either of the two travelers, supply ...


-1

The trade size, also known as lotsize, is the quantity of the purchase. Take it as a minimum order size.


2

what have i done wrong? Your wiring looks correct for the last light in a UK radial lighting circuit wired with the connections in the ceiling rose. See Ceilling light wont switch off after a new installation You could Check that all the screws are fully tightened down. The circuit-breaker in the consumer-unit has not tripped out (or fuse blown). This ...


1

The 23rd edition of the Canadian Electrical Code allows 2AWG aluminum service conductors for a 100A service if the conductor insulation is rated to 90˚C and the conductors terminate on equipment with maximum conductor termination temp of 75˚C (which includes all modern circuit breakers). These service conductors must also be carried in a minimum 1.25" ...


0

While the observed behavior does not correspond with your conjectured wiring description -- it does correspond with your suggestion that the fan and light switches were interchanged. Based on your diagram, the following wiring should work: Black from house nuts with White to the light switch (tag this wire with a piece of electrical tape!) and one of the ...


4

The 225A welder would draw 50A @ 240V on it's maximum setting. The 17,000 BTU/hr heater is electrically equivalent to 5kW, so about 21A @ 240V. If you want to operate both simultaneously plus lights (not much power required for those, however), you need a 100A subfeed to your garage.. 60A will not cut it. A 100A subfeed to the garage requires 3/3 AWG NMD if ...


2

Add up the wattage on the lights, the stereo gear, the fan, and the TV, then divide by 120 and see if it's more than 20 -- although unless you have a monster amp on your stereo, I doubt you'll run into trouble there. As to the receptacle itself, it's fine -- Code only apportions 180VA per receptacle yoke or lighting outlet.


2

It has to be at least 2" away from the top, or bottom of the joist. As far as distance from the ends, there are no rules: Holes: Do not bore holes closer than 2" from joist edges, nor make them larger than 1/3 the depth of the joist. –engineering.purdue.edu, PDF If you look at the document, it clearly states and depicts the top or bottom, with no ...


1

You most likely have an AFCI (Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter) not a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) on this circuit. Although it's not impossible that the breaker is bad, I think this is unlikely. It's more likely that there is an arc fault somewhere in the circuit. These can be hard to find, but worth the effort. I had a similar experience wiring a ...


0

What happened is that the white from the top switch is a neutral, while the white from the bottom switch is a traveler. Hence, one of the travelers is connected directly to both the common wire and the light, and the other traveler coming from the second switch is shorted to the neutral -- which explains the weird behavior and tripped breakers. Now that ...


6

It simply means what the item is referred to in size, .vs. what any actual dimension may be. "Nominal" size means the same thing. So, 1/2" EMT (for example) is 0.706" on the outside and 0.622" on the inside, and 0.500" nowhere.


1

I wouldn't follow that recommendation by Mr. Solar due to safety and it's overkill. You don't want the potential to power both High and Low speeds at the same time plus the 3PDT relay is not required for anything, keep the DPDT. The standard method is to use a SPDT contact to change speeds so that voltage is only applied to either the Low or the High but ...


2

You'll need a double pole breaker. You'll connect the neutral to the neutral bar, the grounding conductor to the grounding bar, one ungrounded (hot) conductor to one terminal of the breaker, and the other ungrounded (hot) conductor to the other breaker terminal. At the panel in the shed, you'll connect the neutral to the neutral bar, the grounding ...


3

They make VR rated tires rated at 130 mph. That is only a max rating -- you're not required to drive 130 mph! Simlarly, you're not required to feed 60A to a 60A-rated panel. In fact I encourage you to use a 100, 125 or 200A panel, because those have more breaker spaces than a 60A. If you want to feed any of them with a 40A breaker in the main panel, ...


2

The feeders and sub-panel need to be sized large enough to carry the calculated load. 3VA's per square foot plus the equipment. There are several sample load calculations in the Annexes in the back of the code book. Or pick up a copy of the text book Code Calculations from the NJATC. If you calculate it at 40 amps then that is your minimum. You can always ...


1

I agree that more knowledge is a good thing, and more knowledge is obtainable - hit one of those big-box home improvement stores' bookshelf section (they only thing they're good for) and paw through "how to wire a house" books til you find one that you vibe with. Or hit a library but those books may not reflect current code. This is learnable. Now, ...


2

No, they do not need to be grounded. If the box contained household voltages, then yes, it would need to be grounded.


4

Since this would be a sub-panel install, ground and neutral are NOT connected - they are isolated. There is but one bond between them per code, and that one already exists in the system that the power is coming from. I'd tend to agree with S.P. that your prior experience is either too long ago or too unrelated to what you are doing for it to seem a great ...


3

According to the National Electrical Code, yes it should be a 20 ampere branch circuit. This circuit should also not have any other outlets, other than the ones for "laundry equipment". So keep the 15 ampere circuit for your general use receptacles, and run a new 20 ampere circuit for the "laundry equipment". Also note that the receptacles in the laundry ...


0

From the looks of your updated photo, your house was wired with a 50s/60s type of NM that carried an undersized (16AWG) "ground"-but-not-really-a-ground with it. The common practice with these wires was to fold them back into or screw them to the cableclamps instead of bringing them into the box and pigtailing them to a ground screw on the box. In this ...


0

I believe you crossed the neutral wires when you replaced the GFCI plug. Switch the 2 white wires, and see what happens.


1

You appear to have older 14-2 without ground coming in from 4 directions, and each of those (or at least three of them) has a separate uninsulated ground alongside. If you combine them and pigtail to the box and your fixture, in theory everything will be protected.


1

Agree with Kris in the earlier post. Look at one of the main wires coming through the conduit in the upper left. It looks like there's a very clearly-cut ground wire that was cut close to the entrance into the box.


2

Here's my best guess at the wiring based on the photo. Looks like you've got one hot/neutral coming into the box from the panel (or another switch/outlet), and you've got 2 hot/neutrals going out of the box to other switches/outlets. Since these are all joined together, it doesn't really matter which one is coming in and which two are going out. Then it ...


0

The good news -- this is UF cable, so it being left outdoors wasn't a total sin compared to the case if this was NM. The bad news -- UL's database is drawing a total blank when I try to plug the file number on your cable into it -- and I can't tell from the markings shown if the cable is sunlight resistant (it will say so if it is), so I have to assume for ...


2

Answer is no...I have the same setup as you. I tried adding 9th camera (wireless) It recognizes it but i can only add it if i remove one of the existing cameras so it looks like they put a limit on how many streams it can take and it could be because hardware limitation.


1

Use a pigtail from the 10AWG wire to the strip light connector: (this is just a representative image, not sure if these will fit your strip lights) Just use wire-nuts to connect the 10AWG wires to the wires that go to the strip light connectors. Or solder and tape them. If you have strip light connectors that aren't pre-wired, then create short jumpers ...


0

You're going to want to use some more appropriately sized wire as pigtails, to transition from the 10 AWG wire to the LED strip.


0

Turn off the corresponding breaker. Remove the receptacles. Turn the breaker back on an test the wires for electricity. If there's no electricity, you have a wiring problem. If there is electricity, your receptacles are bad - replace them.


0

Guatemala uses the same power standards as the USA. Anyone can do anything, but I'd expect to see US style wiring colors, and not old UK style. In the US: Ground = green or bare (green screw) Neutral = white or gray (silver screw) Hot = any other color (brass screw) Ever buy a new smart phone and the buttons and headphone jack are in totally ...


2

You're over-thinking this. Get a replacement plug from the hardware store. Disconnect the "downstream" lights and put the plug on to that wire. Then use an extension cord.


1

The correct answer is: look up the code in your area. In some parts of the USA you can't get insurance on your house unless a licenced electrician does the work -- quite possibly with a construction permit! If there is no code, then as a minimum I would: 1) get a hammer drill and make a proper sub-ground hole in the foundation large enough for a conduit ...


5

If the manufacturer of the hot tub recommends a maximum circuit size of 50 amps then you should change the breaker to 50 amps. The conductors can stay the same. If the 50 amps is a minimum rating for the hot tub then you can leave the 70 amp breaker and conductors. You should always follow the manufacturer's instructions. The National Electrical Code ...


2

Not only does perpendicularity eliminate interference, but also an important point of coaxial design is that any interference affects the core and shield equally, but in opposite polarity. For the second question, yes. Hook up the coax to an oscilloscope and view the waveforms on different settings.


4

Long story short, if you have no proper source of ground, then the proper choice is to use a GFCI with no ground bonded at all. Why this is okay is interesting though: Suppose you have a metal tool with a ground fault. If you are totally isolated from any grounding conductor while using the tool, you will never know it has a fault. Once you become ...


5

Although the neutral wire will generally be near ground potential, there are some situations where it might not be. For example, when switching on a large motor, the voltage on the neutral wire may jump briefly but significantly. Further, if the neutral wire breaks between a device and the panel, it will very likely end up with full line voltage on it. If ...


4

Short answer: NO Bonding the neutral and the ground anywhere but the service is prohibited. This puts neutral current on the ground wire that people expect to be safe under normal conditions. I know they go the same place, but they serve two completely different functions. Good luck!


12

If you cross perpendicular to the power there will be no problems no matter how many cables you cross each cable basically cancels when perpendicular.


2

Rejoice in the conduit. It makes modifications easy - for instance if you ever install a smart switch that needs neutral, you can just add a neutral. You only think of white and black because those are the colors in Romex. Since you're in conduit, that's not a factor. It's a mark of quality for an electrician to use a multitude of colors in an apparent ...


2

First off -- the only guarantees found in North American electrical code are that neutrals are white or grey (but not all whites are neutral) and grounds are green, green/yellow striped, or bare. Things that are neither ground nor neutral can be any other color -- the reason black, red, and to a lesser extent blue are common is because those colors are what ...


1

Always attach a ground to a light fixture regardless if someone can touch it. what happens if the fixture has a short in it but it doesn't blow fuse becaus there's no ground, it'll catch on fire and continue to burn, please consult a licensed electrician. As an electricia n I wouldn't even install a light fixture on a knob and tube box nor would I replace a ...


4

Approved Installations The NEC often states "Approved method" of installation, which in other words is what the manufacture instructs. In the case of the non metallic NM wire connector, Halex© offers an online manual. Other Items That Should Be Fixed The metal stud looks to be 3.5" inch and Code requires no less than 1.25" from the edge of the stud. In ...


4

My SOP is to do switches or outlets one by one, in the sequence I find convenient. I turn off the one circuit it's on. And then I handle it as if it's energized. (Electrocution requires a path through your body, so you are particularly in danger if your body is also in contact with some other wire or object such as a pipe that is grounded) that would ...


1

As the drawing shows at each fan: Red to blue on fan Switched Black to black on fan White to white on fan. Blacks tied to one white are permanently hot, keep them tied back and do not wire to fan. Not shown: Bare copper to green. Assuming the wiring at the switches and outlets was not altered, that should be good.


2

That is a Belden IBDN QCBIX1A4 BIX Distribution Strip with 4 pair markings. A datasheet can be found here. This product line was originally owned by Nortel, so you might see Nortel labels in your panel. It's essentially a 4-pair splicing strip with 110 style punch down terminals - every pair of wires punched down on one side are extended to the other side ...


1

That is a "110" punch-down strip. You need a punch-down tool to terminate to it. I can't see if there is a color code pattern on that strip but there will be an area for each 4-pair cable to terminate. Something like this is a bit easier to follow. T568B is pretty much industry standard for things like a home network. Thing is, you cannot use that ...


0

Concurring with Archon here -- it's probably best/easiest to tackle such a large project circuit-by-circuit, this keeps the inconvenience factor down vs. trying to switch off the entire house and do it all at once. (It also means you can do it over the course of time instead of having to try to redo every device in the house in one fell swoop.) One ...


1

For example, should I simply shut off the mains and do ALL of the fixtures then test everything at once or do it room-by-room? I would tackle the job circuit by circuit. That way you can test as you go. Finding a problem in one room will be much easier than in the whole house. Also, you will have power for a work light if you need one. Ideally, you could ...



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