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0

Unfortunately, you'd have to completely rewire the fixture -- the four-pin base is a sign that the fixture has an integral fluorescent ballast and starter, which provide the current limited, high-ish voltage needed for a fluorescent tube (irrespective of what shape it's twisted into) to operate.


1

I decided that it could be hazardous for the heavy-duty wire from the breaker panel to be allowed to move when the stove is pulled out, because over time the insulation could be worn off at the hole in the floor. I was going to reinstall the junction box and hardwire the stove to it, but my local store doesn't sell 10 ga metal-sheathed electrical cord by ...


0

We ran into this with our Kitchen requiring two GFCI Circuits, we were using GFCI Breakers vs Outlets. The Neutral needs to be dedicated to the GFcI device so it can detect the fault. We ended up running two 12/2 circuits instead of the 12/3.


3

This sounds like an exercise in frustration. Even if you do manage to bond the wires together strongly enough, you will surely damage them by pulling them through staples or around corners. I have frequently seen damaged cables from being pulled through tight spaces. If you damage the outer sheath of a coax cable you will lose a lot of signal strength, and ...


1

As long as the circuits are 120V you can run a 3-waire cable. The only caveat is that you would then need to use a two-pole GFI breaker to protect the circuits. With two 2-wire circuits and single-pole GFI breaker (or devices) you can isolate the circuit for troubleshooting and maintenance.


2

First off. The only way to provide proper "grounding", is to install a grounding conductor from the panel to each outlet. Providing AFCI and GFCI protection to the circuits is helpful, but these devices will not provide "grounding". If you switch from 2-prong receptacles to 3-prong on these circuits, you should not connect anything to the grounding screw ...


2

In most modern fixtures that have multiple lamps, the wires are preconfigured going into the hood so that there is only one black (hot), one white (neutral) and one green or bare (ground) wire coming from the fixture to be attached to the wires in the box. If there are separate wires for the three lamps, all three black wires should be twisted together and ...


1

I'd recommend option 1 or 3 -- AFCI receptacles are much more limited in their functionality than CAFCI breakers are, due to the receptacle being further downstream in the circuit. Also, not all installations conform to the requirements for installing AFCI receptaclesEDIT: the Code I quoted is for new installs only, 210.12(B)(2) permits receptacle AFCIs in ...


0

You do not need to attach the green tail to the grounding wire in the box. By properly attaching this device to a properly grounded metallic box you are inherently providing an adequate grounding path. NEC 2011 404.9 Provisions for General-Use Snap Switches (B) Grounding. Snap switches, including dimmer and similar control switches, shall be ...


1

You would be best advised to shut off all live power feed to this box. Then pull the existing bare copper GND wires out of the back of the box and add an additional bare copper wire pigtail to the bunch. Then reattach to the box with the proper green grounding screw. The new pigtail will get wire nutted to the green wire on your new dimmer switch using an ...


0

I assume you want two switches, one for the fan, another for the light. From your description this would not be possible with the wiring you have. You are one wire short. In order to control both light and fan separately you need an individual hot wire going from switch to fan, and from other switch to light. I would recommend going with a fan with a remote. ...


1

Fluorescent fixtures can be rather tricky. With that many installed on the same circuit, what you might be seeing is an unbalanced load on the circuit, causing some of the fixtures to have full current and others, less, and quite simply a ballast, or any fluorescent will not work without full current. With the warm up times of older ballasts, combined with ...


1

The switch must be in a listed and labeled enclosure, or the switch itself must have a built-in enclosure. The switch should also be rated for the voltage, and current, to which it will be subjected. You'll also want to make sure the switch is attached in such a way, that normal use will not rip it from the enclosure. Pull chains can be subjected to a lot ...


3

If there's no permanent ladder or stairs leading to the attic, you may be able to simply lay the cable across the rafters. "Where this space is not accessible by permanent stairs or ladders, protection shall only be required within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the nearest edge of the scuttle hole or attic entrance.". National Electrical Code Chapter 3 ...


0

I'm not sure what type of relay you're using, but most relays have at least five terminals. two coil terminals, used to power the coil. One common (C) terminal, where the circuit to be controlled will connect. One normally closed (NC) terminal; which is as it sounds, the side of the switch that is closed when no power is supplied to the coil. And one ...


0

I would be concerned if the switchboard isn't rated for the voltage/current. You can circumvent this by having the pi control another relay that is rated for the job. This relay can be either near the pi or near the switch. Some relays have 2 switched outputs (one being the inverted of the other) (single pole double throw). This allows for a proper 3-way ...


0

The real truth is, there is no easy cheap way to do this.you are going to have to do a little of most of these suggestions. Cut access holes, use a drill bit extender, patch, tape, mud, texture, match paint or possibly repaint entire ceiling. If this overwhelms you, hire a contractor. Or Bose sells a surround sound that has only front speakers that use ...


0

When revising AC house wiring, never "assume" anything. Other then the old cliche, making the wrong assumption on house wiring could seriously harm yourself, others, and your house. First - Read the full instructions/user guide for the product, (hopefully you have, though you haven't indicated this). If needed here it is from the wink web site (PDF). ...


0

Based on the information you've provided; and without knowing what TL, TR, and BR stand for, I'd say your proposed wiring looks correct. However, this is assuming that TL is the feed, and that TR and BR are devices you want to turn on/off.


2

When it comes to extensions used for welding and high current draw, I would not factor the cord size based on amp draw alone. Essentially the biggest problem you will face is heat generated within the cord. This is increased if you keep your cord rolled up whilst using it (the electromagnetic effect leading to an induction field). What I am saying is that ...


2

You've asked several questions here. Checking if it's 24V AC First of all, by far the vast majority of furnaces use 24VAC for control wiring. However, it's always better to be sure rather than make assumptions, so there are several ways to do this: Look at the spec sheet or manual for your model Look for labels on the control board, probably where the ...


3

Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


1

Check out some of the hollow baseboard products-- I don't know if Plugmold makes one or not-- but it has duplex outlets along its length. I've seen pictures of 'standard' plugmold with the outlets every foot or so 'built in' to a standard baseboard-- a flat board the same depth as the plugmold, the plug mold on top, with decorative molding at the floor and ...


1

Already answered but assuming this is a US house you don't have 3 phase industrial power. Most likely you don't even have the other 2 phases on the utility pole. You have split phase residential power. A neutral isn't needed since it's balanced no current would flow thru it in the cook top. Basically one phase off the primary side with a center tap. The ...


1

They make a tool called a continuity tester. These also come in the form of a meter product that can also measure voltage and current. You can pick these up at most auto parts stores or hardware stores for a relatively low price. To use the continuity tester, you would connect the clip to one of the known wires, and then touch the end of the probe to ...


1

Green and bare wires are always ground. Ground is a means of short circuit protection, and all metal parts in electrical systems and fixtures are grounded. If a hot wire shorts out and touches the enclosure for some reason, it flows to ground and the circuit breaker/fuse trips (typically this happens in nanoseconds). Without ground, if there is a short, ...


0

I've had a similar problem in my basement fixtures. Check the contacts on the tubes for corrosion and remove it with sandpaper. You can also check the contacts on the fixtures and run some sandpaper in them but make sure the power is off first.


0

Can I install the timer in place of this switch and tie the load side of the timer with both travelers leaving the box? Yes (probably) and no. Unless the timer pulls an amount of current that would put the circuit over 80% of the 15 A supplied by the breaker (12 A) you can install the timer on the original circuit but don't tap the travelers together. ...


1

Green usually means ground, that it goes into the wire bundle may mean it grounds the lower part and the bare wire grounds the upper part (they are isolated from each other by the run). Pigtail the bare and green together with the ground.


3

It is NOT okay to have a 20A circuit breaker on a circuit that has any 14 gauge wire. If there's any #14 wire anywhere downstream, you must use a 15A breaker to protect that wire. It's about fire prevention. #14 wire is rated for 15A. Sure, it will carry more, but the N.E.C. ampacity ratings take into account the resistance of the wire insulation to heat ...


0

So figured out the error was not with my understanding of the wires (although i was lacking some knowledge)... The actual problem was a defective dimmer. I tried a different one, and it worked instantly.


6

In this case, you would simply not hook up the neutral wire. Instead you can just put a wirenut on it and tuck it neatly into the electrical box. Typically 240V appliances require the neutral wire so that they can run the electronics at 120v or provide a plug on the appliance. In this case, these devices are hooked up to one leg of the hot and the ...


2

Without knowing exactly what you've got going on, it's impossible to say for sure what you have to do. It's totally possible that there are no "neutrals" in the box at all, depending on when the house was wired (and by whom). Here's what the schematic should look like... Basically, any wire that comes "after" a load, and creates a low resistance path ...


2

Yes, that would be fine per 2011 NEC Article 334 Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Types NM (Romex), NMC, and NMS. (emphasis mine) 334.30 Securing and Supporting Non-metallic sheathed cable shall be supported and secured by staples, cable ties, straps, hangers, or similar fittings designed and installed so as not to damage the cable, at intervals not ...


0

We simply leave slack through a nm staple and bring the end to nail that is hammered into the corner of the stud. Dry wall guys do a good job at avoiding pinching the wire but if not just pull out the slack.


2

Yes, you can loop around a box provided you staple like you describe. I'd suggest having the cable not touch the box since someday the box may have to be removed and keeping the cable away from the box will prevent it getting damaged.


2

Accessible or not While you might call this area inaccessible because it's small, dark, and difficult to enter. In this case, the codes definition of accessible is whether or not there's permanent stairs or a ladder. Cable run across the top of joists If the attic is accessible by permanent stairs or ladder, any cable running across the top of joists ...


0

I'm no electrician, but this is my understand of how the various codes work together to protect all components of the circuit. Breakers protect wiring and trip on shorts The really important thing is your wire gauge matches your circuit breaker. The breaker is designed to protect the wiring, as well cut power in the event of a short. If you violate code ...


0

I was replacing an outlet and had the breaker turned off. There was still a small amount of current through the outlet. I had an electrician check it out and it turned out to be from a night light plugged into an outlet in another part of the house. He unplugged the night light, end of problem.


-1

The main rule you have to worry about is the rule about combining low voltage and high voltage wires in the same raceway (pipe). Even though the signal wire is 9volt, is has to be treated as if it had 120v on it. Whatever contraption you make has to isolate that voltage from outside it. So simply connecting a 9v wall-wart to it is no good - if there was ...


1

Sounds to me like an open neutral. This will give you a reading of voltage (to ground or with a pen tester) but the circuit will not work. You need to check the connections at every device on the circuit.


2

There are two considerations for this. Attics without permanent access stairs/ladder. You must protect cables located within 6' of the attic access hole. Attics with permanent access stairs/ladder. You must protect all cables running perpendicular and atop the joists. Ultimately, for type NM (Romex), this is directly referenced in the 2011 NEC ...


-1

The "average" electrician will just leave them unsecured (obviously dangerous). If you hire an expensive electrician, he will drill holes through the joists. The proper method is to use running boards, which are two, parallel 1x2 boards that are nailed into the joist on either side of the wire. Electricians will not do this because they are not carpenters. ...


1

It's tapped like that because that's the way it was supposed to be done when that work was done. Back in those days (<2011) if you had a single 2-wire feed (romex) to and fro a switch box. The white wire would, according to more recent codes prior to NEC 2011, and possibly then too but not followed, have been taped a solid color other than green to notify ...


1

The video is wired differently, because the power (feed) goes to the switch first in that situation. In your situation, the power (feed) is at the light. In your box, the feed comes in and the white grounded (neutral) conductor is connected to the grounded (neutral) conductor of the light, and presumably a feed to another branch of the circuit. The black ...


1

No - the breaker has to be sized for the conductor it protects. Your 10 gauge conductors have to be treated as the separate conductors they are. If one of the 10 gauge wires downstream was damaged, it could overheat without tripping the breaker.


1

Normally you would have two parallel runs that are perpendicular the ceiling joists. You want to space these runs over the load bearing walls on each side of the hosueb so that you can drop right in where needed. For most truss systems this will end up being close to on right on where your inverted V first hits floor on each side. The individual ...


3

I'll have to disagree with Tester101 here. A smoke detector, at least in my area, is NOT considered a "fire alarm", nor is it even implied in the name. It is extremely common to have smokes and CO detectors on a lighting circuit so they cannot be easily or conveniently turned off. IMO powering a receptacle for a router is fine since the router is a ...


6

No. The 2011 version of the National Electrical Code made this very clear. National Electrical Code 2011 Chapter 7 Special Conditions Article 760 Fire Alarm Systems 760.41 NPLFA Circuit Power Source Requirements (B) Branch Circuit. The branch circuit supplying the fire alarm equipment(s) shall supply no other loads. The location ...


1

Electrical appliances usually switch only the hot wire when turning on and off. So if the wires were swapped then if the appliance was off then a fault may cause the chassis of the machine to become hot if improperly grounded. If it was properly grounded it would result in a higher current to the ground wire.



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