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1

You could have cross polarity in the main board where the breaker is off but the neutral bar is feeding the board backwards, that's why you always test with a probe tester live to earth even when you know you have switched it off. Professionals always do this as there's somtimes no coming back from a good shock! ⚡️😄👍


2

If your entire branch circuit is using 12 AWG wire, then yes. Swap the old breaker with a new 20 Amp GFCI breaker.


0

The combination of a "bootleg ground" and reverse outlet polarity can cause this, as well as a hot-to-floating-"ground" short. The two can be distinguished using a non-contact detector and an outlet tester. The outlet tester will show a hot-to-floating-"ground" short with a normal neutral as an open ground wire (as there will be no potential across that ...


0

I just had a similar issue. Chances are a wire in the outlet is shorting another wire. You probably can't see it in that outlet because the short is from another outlet. Ie. Where the outlet is fed from. With a multimeter check the outlet and you will likely get strange voltages or as you said full line voltage on the ground. Check the voltage on the steel ...


0

That is why on the outside the USE those grey cable boxes, it allows protection of the cable coming up straight from the ground near the house, inside of it using an L connection for the bend, or just room to curve, and then enter the house. Any feed with out protection that doesn't come straight out near the house will get damaged eventually if not ...


0

From what you have described, I see no reason why you would not have adequate space in your sub panel. As far as wiring, you are correct in that you will have two hots (L1, L2), a ground, and no neutral. Without seeing the spec sheet for exact numbers, I can only suggest that you take the conservative approach and wire using a double-pole 30A breaker with ...


4

You are on the right track. As it comes from the store, the upper and lower sections of standard double outlets are connected by the small tab connecting the brass plates under the screws on either side. To separate those sections so that one half is constantly on and the other half is switched, break the tab on the hot side of the outlet. This is usually ...


1

Depends partly on the device. Some electric ranges/cooktops/driers have electronic controls which run on 120V even though they're controlling 240V; they get that 120V by connecting between one leg of the 240V supply and neutral. In that case, obviously, without neutral those controls don't run.


0

Cap the wires (done) and simply fold them into the box. Obtain the cover plate of your choice at the nearest home center. Electrical codes to not permit permanent covering of junction boxes, but there's a qualifier: if the circuit is disconnected at the panel (wires detached from breaker) then it doesn't count as a circuit anymore. But it is unlikely that a ...


0

In this particular case, the black wire WAS NOT getting triggered by the switch. For the fixtures in question, the red wire needed to connect to the Black fixture wire, while the black wires were the "extra hot leg" that needed to be capped off separately.


4

You can leave the ground wire bare, it's fine. As long as the other wires are capped off so that no bare metal is exposed, then those are fine, too. You can bend the wires and stuff them all into the box, then put a blank faceplate on the box. You cannot cover the box with sheetrock or anything. You have to leave it accessible.


4

Yes, you wired it wrong. :) The red wire is another hot leg. This is a common installation when the electrician is providing wires for a ceiling fan with lights (to be independently switched). The red wire shares a common neutral with the black wire, hence the three white wires. You should keep the white wires connected. Disconnect the red wire and cap ...


-3

Don't know if this reply is factual, but I have been informed by at least 2 sources, that starting load for refrigerators is quite high and that this quite often causes the GFI to trip on start-up. This also would cause any other GFI on any other circuit to also trip when the fridge is plugged into it. Also, I'm told that all GFI's are now made with a ...


0

Your sensor / switch device is designed to be mounted into an electrical box with permanent wiring. Your light fixture with its attached cord (with three prong plug) is meant to be connected into an outlet that is itself mounted in an electrical box with permanent wiring. The lamp itself, when configured this way could be considered a temporary connection ...


2

Your light fixture has hot, neutral, and ground. The diagram actually shows the switched hot and neutral connecting to the light - ground is or should be obvious, it's not shown probably to reduce clutter. As shown on the diagram, you connect the neutral from the wires supplying the location of the sensor to the fixture wire. It does not connect to the ...


0

http://www.kyleswitchplates.com/push-button-light-switches/ will get you what you are looking for


0

OEM builder grade anything is not the best. replace with a heavy duty switch and use the things on the side called screws. builder grade is meant to have a life time that exceeds the home warrantee but cheap enough so they feel that their profit margin was boosted enough so they con focus on other corners to cut. I know I installed thousands of them as a ...


0

Yes, you just have to buy the right dimmer. Here in the USA, most dimmers are compatible with 3-way circuits. I'm not sure if that's true in your area, so you'll have to verify when buying the dimmer. NOTE: In the USA we would call this type of circuit a 3-way, while other countries (yours included) refer to it as a 2-way circuit.


0

You will need FOUR conductors. A 50A RV circuit/receptacle is a 120/240V circuit which requires two hots, a neutral and a ground. Regardless of what you use, 6/2 would NOT be appropriate. I also agree, 500' is a LONG way for 120/240V. Not the best situation.


5

Simple. Replace the breaker for that oven with a 20A version since that's what the instructions call for. You're lucky that the wire is almost certainly large enough for 20A. Going down in breaker size is FINE. Going up rarely is.


3

OK, a bunch of stuff to respond to: Wire size There are really two considerations when picking wire size: Safety. You do not want the wire to overheat and catch fire. 6 gauge is fine for 50 amps, so you're good on this front. Voltage drop. Long wires cause the voltage to drop. Upsizing the wire will counteract this. Typically you want to keep the voltage ...


0

In addition to all the other comments, I would suspect you have reversed colour code- IOW, the wiring may have been installed using white as hot FROM THE BREAKER BOX. I knew of a house that was wired switched neutral all over the house BY A LICENSED CONTRACTOR. The woman's son died from this gross violation. Many licensed contractors hire untrained ...


0

OMG what a mess!!!, you are correct this is a switched neutral situation. the white wires are neutrals and should be tied together with out a switch. the black wires should go to the switches. a white wire can be used on a light switch or a switched plug... if it is then make sure it is the sire going to the load and not the hot side. black red blue ...


1

See this little tab here? Turn the power to this box off at the circuit breaker, and verify it's off. Then grab the little tab with a pair of needle nose pliers, and bend it back and forth until it breaks off. Once you restore power, half of the receptacle will be controlled by the switch, while the other will be always on. A couple other notes about ...


2

You are right to be concerned about switched neutrals. A dangerous situation. You can test it by using a non-contact tester similar to this one Turn on the breaker (after making sure no terminals are touching anything metal). Check the wires going to each of the switches. If wired correctly, one of each should be hot. If they are not, you have a ...


3

To make one outlet switched and one outlet on all the time, you need to break off that little brass tab on the outlet in between the where the black and red wires are screwed in. To make both outlets switched, you need to disconnect and cap the red wire that is screwed into the outlet and not break off that brass tab. Don't mess with the tab on the neutral ...


1

Since there's no grounding conductor in the box (i.e. the box is not grounded), touching a meter lead to metal is basically useless.Your COM probe should go to the grounded (neutral) (white wire in your case), then you can use the other probe to test for voltage. It sounds to me like there might be a problem with the wiring inside the fixture, since you ...


0

so I'm not sure if im too late for your answer, but an EMT connecter and Flex don't go together. You want to use a BX connecter to bond that flex on both sides and you need a red plug bushing on each side to protect the cables from being pinched. you can also use a few wraps of electrical tape around the conductors (push under the flex) if you cant find the ...


2

You inadvertently bypassed the switch loop that controls that light fixture. There will most likely be a cable with a white wire that is not connected to any other white wire -- that cable is the switch loop in all but the newest installations.


1

That's correct. If you're installing a 240 volt load, there's no need for the grounded (neutral) conductor. As you suggest, you will need a grounding conductor though.


0

In addition to what Alan said... A wire tracer to help trace wires behind walls. Shut off the circuit, connect the tone generator, follow it with the tracer. A breaker finder: Plug it into an outlet, or connect it to a wire pair. Use the finder to determine the breaker. You should also have an outlet tester to test outlets. Note: I have never used ...


0

I assume there must be a main breaker panel somewhere. Start by tripping all breakers, shutting off electricity to the whole house. Activate a single breaker. Walk all over the house, seeing what still seems to work. Note that on a (large) drawing. Make extensive notes. Deactivate this breaker. Activate another. Repeat until finished. This should give ...


1

I have a 240v 30amp welder wired in the way you described. Hot, Hot, Ground. Be sure to use the correct 2 pole breaker.


0

I ended up getting an outdoor extension cord for this. The cord is used for stuff like powering Christmas decorations and the like, and has a cover to shield the outlets from the elements.


2

I'm gonna go with tripped GFI somewhere you're not aware of.


2

I'm picking this up from our comments. So this isn't a GFCI. Although if it's in the kitchen, and isn't protected by an upstream GFCI receptacle, and isn't protected by a GFCI circuit breaker in the panel, maybe it should be a GFCI. Did the old receptacle work at all before you removed it, or had it stopped working completely? Was the hot-side (darker ...


2

You might consider using a surface-mount raceway. You could use something like this to run the wires along the inside corners of your shelving up to the bumped out wall above the fireplace, then punch through into that cavity. If you want to run HDMI (and maybe something like Ethernet), keep in mind that you cannot run line power and low-voltage cables ...


2

My guess is that when you pulled on the wires to get to them, the hot (red or black) wire feeding the circuit came loose. They should be pig-tied inside the j-box. Turn off the breaker for that circuit, pull apart the wires and make sure they're all secure. FWIW, the hot goes to the small side of the outlet and the neutral to the wide side (green or bare ...


0

IMO there is NO WAY you'll be able to run sideways without considerable damage, which also IMO would be crazy. Consider how set back the back of the bookcase is compared to the face of above the FP. Is there attic space above? I'd snake up from that receptacle to the attic (or find another acceptable power source) and then snake down to the TV location. ...


1

In the first place, having two pieces of equipment (the dryer and the aircon) that both need quite a bit of power, both on the same circuit is probably not a good idea. You have already noticed there is interference between them. So the first step would be to get one or the other onto a second circuit. I don't know how electrical codes are in your country ...


-3

one reason you don't put romex in conduit is because it creates more heat and is not advised in conduit if you have conduit you can run insulated wires instead it's probably cheaper. when you put romex inside conduit The Romex cannot breathe and retains too much heat.I always thought that it was okay. And I asked a licensed electrician. he looked at me ...


5

Definitely sounds like an open neutral. By the sounds of it, the bad/loose connection is in the box where the power strip was plugged in.


3

Read inside the box. If you install 14 AWG conductors to the new box, instead of 12 AWG conductors. You'd need at least a 22 cu.in. Box, or a 3" x 2" x 3 1/2" device box. 8 for current carrying conductors. 1 for grounding conductors. 2 for device fill. 11 total, times 2.00 cu.in. for 14 AWG conductors = 22 cu.in. However, since you're using 12 AWG, the ...


0

With GFCI Protection of Devices If you want to provide GFCI protection of the fixture, you'd feed the switches from the LOAD side of the GFCI device. Without GFCI Protection of Devices If you don't want to provide GFCI protection to the devices, you'd feed the switches from the incoming feeder. NOTE: I've labeled one of the dimmer terminals as "C" ...


0

Lutron Maestro line of switches can communicate wirelessly to multiple ceiling mounted occupy sensor that use a battery. The switches work the lights as normal if the sensors battery dies. I've installed them and give it a thumbs up. Battery Version


0

YES! Absolutely this is a problem. You CANNOT use a red wire for a neutral. Unless you are in Canada and have a "heating circuit" cable with only a red and black there should definitely be a white wire present.


1

You should use 12/2 if the 240v appliance requires two hot plus ground. If you can't find 12/2 wire that has black/red/ground... you can use the more common wire that has black/white/ground where both black and white are hot. If doing this you MUST identify the white wire as hot at the appliance (or outlet if used) and at the panel. I always use colored heat ...


1

First off, you likely want type UF cable for this application -- URD isn't even a recognized NEC type to begin with, and even URD/USE cable can't be run indoors as per 338.12(B)(1) as it lacks the fire-resistive insulation of NM, UF, and SE cables. Second -- while 2AWG copper USE has an ampacity of 115A as per the NEC, since you cannot use USE in this ...


4

This is one single branch circuit, and a very common wiring method. I've highlighted the ungrounded (hot) conductors in your image, to help you understand what's going on. The wires highlighted in red, represent the feed coming to the box from the panel. These wires are split, so as to provide power to both switches. If you were to measure between any of ...


5

That isn't three circuits, it's only two. The Romex on the left is the power coming in from your distribution box, and the other two are your two loads. Each switch is connected between the incoming power and one of the loads. I'm not sure why there are so many wirenuts on the supply side — it seems that if one wirenut can connect three wires, then ...



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