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This is problematic. The most obvious: Your PV panels will be generating power all day, while you're likely to want to operate lights all night but not so much during the day. That means your PVs will need to feed a battery bank through a PV controller/charger (which is usually contained inside the inverter anyway), and said battery bank will need to be in a ...


5

GU10 sockets are symmetrical: so there is no need to pay attention to where you hook the live and neutral wires, because the lamp will work, and will be inserted, in either ways. If you are wiring the switch too put it on the live wire, if possible, so that changing the lamp with the switch off is actually safe. The socket looks pretty safe to me anyway. ...


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There can only be one point in the system where neutral and ground wires are joined, and this is usually in the main panel. Therefore, you must lift the bond from the generator, or disconnect the ground wire from the generator to the transfer switch. If you lift the bond on the generator, you can run both ground and an insulated neutral back to the ...


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As @Tester101 says, with conventional dimmers, you can only have one dimmer in a circuit if the fixture (or set of fixtures) is being controlled from more than one location. If you are switching from two locations, you also need to use 3-way switches for both the plain switches and dimmers (many dimmers are 3-way compatible). There are specialized ...


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You can only have one dimmer per group. You can put the dimmer at either location, but not both locations. There are "companion" dimmers available from some companies, that allow you to place additional dimmers in the circuit. But you'll have to use compatible equipment, which may or may not be available at your local big box store.


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I moved the wiring for my rear speakers from the wall to the ceiling, when I bought new surround speakers. I just cut a 1" channel to span the corner, rather than try to drill through the headers. With all the changes I have made in my 3 houses, I have gotten very good at sheetrock "invisible mending". Getting the wall smooth enough is easy, then I brush on ...


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My personal experience. I plugged in a radiant heater into a 20A receptacle in my garage. It ran for about 3 hours before the breaker tripped. Also a burnt plastic melt smell. The entire garage was dead. I did a LFS (Look for stuff) and noticed the receptacle that the garage door was plugged into had a black soot color coming from under the receptacle cover. ...


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Based on the Lusa Lighting Model #33000 which are sold under Hampton Bay brand #148652 (For the 3 Bulb White kit), these are not LED lights. They are straight Halogen Light Fixtures. Each of the Light is a standard 120V Halogen Bulb in a fixture, wired with a standard 2-prong outlet plug. The kit comes with a basic 3 to 1 power strip. If you have 4 lights, ...


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Do you want the new light to be switched with the 3ways? If you want it to be independent, no problem. If you want it to work in tandem with the other light, BIG problem - one perhaps best solved by the use of a "wireless switch".


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You CANNOT do this without rewiring. This is a common request that most folks think is no problem. It simply cannot be done with your existing wiring. The simplest thing is to get a wire from the existing light to the new one.


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Your question is a little unclear a diagram and pictures would help. If you want to add a light to a 3 way set up the easiest way is to run a 2 wire of the same size as the others in the circuit from the existing switched light to your new one and connect the wires color to color.


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With that many red and black wires at the fan box you could have travelers for a 3 way in that box. If the switch is a 3 way and you cannot duplicate all of the original connections have an electrican wire it for you.


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360W 50 Hz transformer is big and expensive. Conductive losses on 30A will be large at 12V. A reasonable approach is consider 5% losses in distribution max. For this you need the average length of cable carrying 30A from source to load. They should not be daisy chained more than 50W per FPC cable unless otherwise suggested by supplier. Lets assume 10m ...


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Is this approach correct? Basically, yes. 1mm2 twin and earth cable (I presume that is what you are proposing) could carry up to 16A, depending on where it runs, so 1.5A is well within the headroom (assuming that you aren't talking such long runs that voltage drop becomes an issue). For lighting, however, I tend to use 1.5mm2 in preference to cable ...


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One red wire on one screw, right? And two black wires under the other screw (or poked into those dang quick-connect holes I hate so much)? If so, that's an ordinary switch, not a three-way. If it actually has three screws on the body of the switch, though, it's a three-way... and given your description of things, there's no really good reason for that. If ...


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First check the Bulb as it is the easiest thing to check. Next would to verify the wiring to the fixture. And last, check the fixture itself. Since it looks like what you have is a fixture/bulb, you might need to move it to another location and see if it exhibits the same behavior.


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If the old fixture worked, at least one of the white wires is hot. The easiest way to check which is hot is to use a non-contact tester. If the fixture is already removed, leave the two wires bundled together with a wire nut over the end. Put a wire nut on the single white wire. Turn the breaker back on. Only one of those should register on tester. That is ...


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It makes absolutely NO difference. Even if the water pipes broke and flooded the stud bay the cable would not typically be damaged or harmed. NOR would it"short out" even in the slightest, even if it got into a device box. Worrying about having electric and plumbing in the wall together is tantamount to worrying about having gas in the gas tank of your car ...


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It sounds as if the cable going to the switch just requires a feed. I am not sure how you intend to bring power to the gazebo from the main house, but basically you would wire both 12/2 cables to the #12 feed wire and wire it color for color; white to white, black to black, ground to ground. The GFI would get wired to the LINE terminals only. Please ...


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You should have capped it, or connected it to either the black or blue from the ceiling fan only. The remote receiver takes power from the switch (black and white input leads), and outputs power to the light (blue output lead), the fan (black output lead), or both. With the black wire from the ceiling connected to the receiver, one of the switches will ...


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I would think in a perfect world I would always have electric above plumbing so that if you have any floods or leaks that there isn't a short. The chances of it mattering are almost zero since electric is insulated. The water would basically have to come in around the outlet. Since you cannot always pick the height of your outlet (you won't have normal ...


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If the wire for the switch and the bell that is in the existing conduit is carrying 110V, the answer is NO. You can not mix High & Low Voltage in the same conduit, so you will need to run an additional conduit to connect to the second set of terminals. Is this for your residence or for a business? I question this as you are "playing with fire", in ...


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It's definitely a interpretation issue with the local inspectors. You can improve the installation in the picture by following the guidelines in 110.26 they may allow the wire within the working space about the panel to be not subject to damage but the water line should be rerouted to be outside the working space described in 110.26 also the wire should be ...


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You have some pretty weird wiring to the light fitting. It looks like at the light fitting (fed from top-right romex at box) you would find the "ground" wire (green or bare copper in the US?) is being used as a neutral return from the light bulb. the "hot" (black) is a switched hot to the light bulb. the "neutral wire (white) is being used as a permanent ...


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The C wire, not to be confused with R or RC is the return path. Think of it as a ground, though technically not. Based on the information above, none of the wires O, B, W, G, R, Y, will work for C. So they can not be jumped over to the C connection. The C wire, usually the brown wire on the transformer, the low voltage (24v) is the common. However, no ...


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Electrical Metallic Tubing (Type EMT) Pros Protection from physical damage Larger internal area (1/2" EMT = 0.622 in. ID) Available in sizes over 2" Easy to push through closed walls and bored holes. Can be used as equipment grounding conductor Cons Requires fittings Costs slightly more ($0.256/ft.) More difficult to cut More difficult to bend ...


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The answer is yes; it was a problem. The wiring wasn't done correctly. I had an HVAC guy come out. He suspected that whoever installed my thermostat cheated by using some lower grade wire and doubling them up. Sure enough when he untwisted the wires from the old thermostat and checked the voltage with a multimeter we saw that the pair would give us the ...


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I asked the local inspector, and he said SCH 40 is fine for both above and below ground. I ended up using 2-2-2-4 Aluminum (marketed as mobile home feeder) to support the 60 amp service.


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I would use a pigtail (short piece of wire) between the building wiring and the socket, attached with a wire nut. The reason is pretty simple - every time you replace the socket you probably need to cut off and restrip the end of the wire. Eventually that wire gets so short that its difficult or impossible to attach the socket to. If you use the wire nuts ...


2

I WOULD NOT attach the building wiring directly to the socket. I would use some #16 or #18ga stranded leads from the socket. There needs to be some flexibility between the socket and the house wiring since even something as simple as changing lamps will move the socket around a bit, as well as expansion and contraction from the extreme heat generated by ...


0

The metal casing of the iPod caused the power strip to short out. The breaker did it's job in tripping when it sensed two much current on the line. The iPod might live, might not. But it is safe to see if it does. The power strip, even it if works, is dead. Throw it out. The circuit should be safe to turn back on. I say should, because if was wired ...


1

I would suspect your daughters iPod charging port has shorted. It is not uncommon, and a known issue with late model 4-5 phones and pods, but heavily denied by Apple. While her room's circuit is off, unplug the iPod and power strip. Then turn the circuit on and test it out with something that is known to work well, a lamp, or if you want something to pull ...


1

Toss the power strip and turn the breaker back on - you'll almost certainly be fine. The circuit breaker did its job by tripping, and you can reasonably expect it to do the same thing if you get another short or arc fault. When you replace the power strip itself, make sure that the one you get has its own over-current protection.


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As long as the wiring is copper, there should be no problem using the screw terminals. If you're in the US, black (hot) to brass, white (neutral) to silver.


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The answer is it depends on the applaince. As long as the appliance does not expressly forbid using it on a 30A circuit you should be fine. You'll be able to change the plug and put on a 14-30P plug, just ignore the silver terminal (neutral).


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Generally, an appliance wired with a 6-20P plug calls for maximum 20A over current protection. The reason why different plugs exist and adapters do not. You need a 20A breaker if you install a 6-20R receptacle. The neutral would be caped at the outlet. NEMA 6 (3 prong) is for appliances that don't need 120v for secondary devices. NEC article 406.7: ...



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