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-1

I think the best way for a layman to understand this common question is to look at it from the appliance perspective - that is, what's being plugged INTO the receptacle? ANY appliance that draws more than 15A but less than 20A by code MUST have a 20A rated plug on it. You can't insert at 20A plug into a 15A receptacle because a 20A plug has one sideways ...


1

According to the schematic, the B terminal does appear to be connected to the transformer. I'd actually trace the wiring in the unit just to confirm, but based on the schematic it looks good. You'll want to make sure the transformer has enough power to supply the additional load of the new thermostat, but typically it isn't a problem. If you hook up ...


1

@Aaron, what you propose is fine. Remember, splices inside conduit are not allowed, so your plan to remove the j-box, extend the conduit, and pull new wire is perfect.


0

I don't know why everyone is saying this is okay, and trivializing the matter of "confusing future electricians". This is a big deal. You should not mix gauges of wires in the same circuit. Regardless of what code says, I guarantee this will not pass inspection in some jurisdictions and depending on how bad a day the inspector is having. Not ...


0

The Hubbell single AC video/HDMI/audi gang box can be found here


0

Thank you, it worked! I capped the striped, attached the red to the wire with the lighter grey coating and the black to the dark grey coated wire. The green I attached to nothing as the box isn't grounded. As it's an old house(obviously), I wore rubber boots even though I turned the breaker off, and when I turned it back on everything worked. I don't know ...


4

If you are using #10 stranded under a screw using a crimp terminal will be the easiest and safest connection. For that size and application you'd want to use a yellow fork terminal. Here is a good tutorial: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/working-with-wire/how-to-crimp-an-electrical-connector


2

Not sure what make and model dimmer you're trying to install, so I'll describe a common installation. Wire colors could vary, depending on manufacturer. Black is the common terminal, and is attached to the ungrounded (hot) conductor feeding the switch. Red is the switched lead (or a traveler in a 3-way installation), and is attached to the switched hot ...


1

No. Definitely NO way to make that receptacle switched in any way without running new wire. Sorry. Looks like those two switches were intended to control a fan and light separately. Notice how the black and red are in the same cable? That cable goes up to the fan/light.


0

The water alone was NOT what tripped the breaker. Water alone does not cause shorts and arcs. You have another issue somewhere in that cable run. Check every connection, box, splice, etc. And yes, you could be doing more damage to the wire or breaker by repeatedly trying the breaker and tripping it so many times. On another note, if you only have 12/3 ...


0

I have the same prob with the flash on start up. I replaced the first bulb with an incandescent and the flash went away. Not sure why.


1

No. No, you cannot. Also, if you're talking about Alternating Current (AC) it's not a negative wire, it's a grounded conductor or "neutral" wire.


2

You've pretty much got it. If you can twist wires with wire nuts and connect them to a switch you have the technical skills needed. The hardest part is usually pulling the wire from the wall into the ceiling. Get an "old work" ceiling/light box. Cut a hole in the desired ceiling location, ensuring no joist will interfere with anchoring the old work box ...


-1

I would look for a ceiling light that is mounted with regular expansion plug screws (or whatever kind of screw is applicable to your ceiling material) instead of older methods such as hooks or threaded pipe. Then it's just a matter of running the wires (or rather, some proper electrical conduit such as corrugated tubing) from your switch to that spot over ...


1

If there is no indication whatsoever then no, it doesn't matter. That looks like an internationally universal ballast, so in the US you'd have two hots @ 240V/60Hz, and in a place like the UK you'd have a hot and a neutral @ 230V/50Hz.


1

Are you in the USA? If so, then you won't have a neutral because it requires 230 volts.


0

Wires that run through conduit must be complete and unbroken. So if you have to splice the wires together with wire nuts or whatever is appropriate for your jurisdiction, then no, you can just just join the conduit together. Some other options: Cover the junction box with a blank cover and paint it to match your ceiling. Get an in-wall rated splice. ...


1

Based on your description, you cannot do what you want unless you run additional conductors. It sounds like all you have in the box is a switch loop. Meaning you have a wire coming "from" the fan, and a wire returning "to" the fan. The wire "from" the fan will be electrified, while the other wire will only be electrified when it's connected to the ...


1

If you're not planning on installing an electrical panel in the garage, the installation is quite straight forward. You can basically treat the garage circuit, just like any other branch circuit. If you do plan on installing a panel in the garage, the following information is not for you. Overview You'll install a 20 ampere breaker, in the panel in the ...


5

If one switch is overriding the other in a three-way circuit, that usually means one of the switches has been hooked up incorrectly. If you get the common and one of the travellers exchanged, you will see exactly this behavior. Double-check each switch to make sure you know which contacts are the common and the two selectable terminals, and double-check ...


0

You can't do what you want with GFCI receptacles. You'll have to buy a couple regular duplex receptacles, and write them exactly as the old ones were wired. And don't forget to break off the tab between the terminals, on the "hot" side of the receptacles.


5

"The bridge between the screws was not broken" Are you 100% sure of that? Because the common use for black and red wires and a two-pole breaker in a kitchen outlet circuit is for a common neutral circuit (multiwire branch circuit), and shorting the two phases together with the new outlet would produce exactly the symptoms you have seen. So I'm going to ...


0

Whatever that red wire runs to appears to have a short circuit to neutral or ground. Were it mine, I'd experiment with capping off the red wire by itself and using only the black/white/bare wires to the new receptacle, then see if anything else in the area fails to work. If everything else has power, you're finished.


0

It is hard to figure out what you are saying, but I assume you mean there are two 14/2 or 12/2 cables coming to your existing vent fan. The way it was probably wired before was one of the white wires is the neutral, and the rest of them were all switched hot wires. If you have already taken the wiring loose you are going to have to figure out which cable ...


0

Not counting the ground wires, you have four insulated conductors. One could be the supply hot, each of the others could be switched hot leads. The presumption would be that the neutral is in the ceiling box and not present in the wall box. Totally possible. If this is true, please mark the switched hot leads appropriately.


0

One switch originally controlled the light and vent, and the other originally controlled the heater? Or did only one switch control everything? Clearly you don't have three separate switched wires and a neutral and a ground. It's barely possible that the ground was used as a neutral before, and the white was used as a switch leg, but that's a seriously bad ...


1

If you live in the USA, that's a perfectly fine ballast for your purposes, Lori. Some manufacturers bring the yellow wires out the same end, some bring them out the opposite end. That ballast is rated to handle two 40W T12 tubes. If you live in a country with 240V municipal power, though, that ballast won't work for you; it's built to be connected only to ...


0

"INSTALLING MULTIPLE G.F.C.I. ON THE SAME FEED LINE" However to install multiple gfci on the same feed wire it's necessary to wire the gfci's a little differently. You actually don't connect "any wire" to the load side of the 1st - 2nd - 3rd and so on to all the gfci on the same feed line. It's necessary to connect the green or hot to the same line (gold ...


1

A WR GFI uses stainless components and screws. GFI's are notorious for rusting, especially at the mounting screws. The one that went bad was probably older, before WR's were even available. Yes, you need a WR GFI, and an in-use cover. In fact, I'd venture to bet that much of your installation is not up to code. IF it is that close to the pool the receptacle ...


0

This is problematic. The most obvious: Your PV panels will be generating power all day, while you're likely to want to operate lights all night but not so much during the day. That means your PVs will need to feed a battery bank through a PV controller/charger (which is usually contained inside the inverter anyway), and said battery bank will need to be in a ...


5

GU10 sockets are symmetrical: So there is no need to pay attention to where you hook the live and neutral wires, because the lamp can be inserted either way. As the wiring is AC the main reason to wire it up one way or another is for safety considerations. If you are wiring the switch too, put it on the live wire if possible, so that changing the lamp ...


0

There can only be one point in the system where neutral and ground wires are joined, and this is usually in the main panel. Therefore, you must lift the bond from the generator, or disconnect the ground wire from the generator to the transfer switch. If you lift the bond on the generator, you can run both ground and an insulated neutral back to the ...


3

As @Tester101 says, with conventional dimmers, you can only have one dimmer in a circuit if the fixture (or set of fixtures) is being controlled from more than one location. If you are switching from two locations, you also need to use 3-way switches for both the plain switches and dimmers (many dimmers are 3-way compatible). There are specialized ...


2

You can only have one dimmer per group. You can put the dimmer at either location, but not both locations. There are "companion" dimmers available from some companies, that allow you to place additional dimmers in the circuit. But you'll have to use compatible equipment, which may or may not be available at your local big box store.



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