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0

It's not the wiring. It's the LEDs themselves. LEDs have a characteristic delay when turning them on which may be more than you're used to from a lifetime of incandescent bulbs. Swap the LEDs from one position to another, and the problem should move with the bulb. Replace the LED with the equivalent incandescent (temporarily) and it should go away ...


-1

Whether or not I could get away with it, I would first off NEVER put 15a receptacles on a 20a line. I've personally witnessed a receptacle melt in this fashion when a 10+ a heater on a 15a line cooked a 10a outlet. Same principle applies to a 15a outlet on a 20a line. Very unsafe.


4

Sounds like you have one black hot wire coming into the box (probably that bottom one), which passed through a hot over to your bedroom switch. So my guess would be that you should have two of the blacks wirenutted together -- that would be the hot wire coming in to the box, and the passthrough to the bedroom light. Also in that bundle should be two ...


0

For a 200A residential service in the US or Cananda typical would be 4/0-4/0-2/0AL or 2/0-2/0-1/0CU conductors. Either combination would normally be run in 2" conduit. This is only scratching the surface of what you need to know to do this project. Are you aware and knowledgeable of all the other requirements/codes/etc???


0

Some approved insulations (such as polystyrene) have a lower heat rating than standard NM cable. Since all conventional insulations can touch an IC rated fixture, cable should be no problem.


0

I have no internet at this location (rural) and had to leave before I had an answer to the question. I replaced the box and the outlet. I wired the outlet normally - hot to hot, neutral to neutral, ground to ground - and then used a polarized non-grounded plug to test it. Everything worked fine but, since I did not have the question yet answered I flipped ...


2

The old boxes in their current location will be decommissioned. Whether they get caps, or are removed and the holes patched over is an aesthetic question and up to you (as @Kris says). Since you have access from the attic, you have two choices as expressed in your question leave existing wire and boxes connected, shift them, and add wiring and a third box ...


1

Caveat: Definitely take the advice of a local professional electrician. Yes, You're Okay Doing This This is assuming that your dimmer is rated for your household current and that you don't attach any loads to the dimmer that exceed the capacity of the wire, and your circuit breaker protects the wire either way. This actually strikes me as an interesting ...


3

There's no technical reason that he can't move the boxes. It would certainly be more elegant. My best guess is that your electrician doesn't like drywall repair/ painting. If the ceiling is textured, that's a strong disincentive, as matching texture is hard. He'll definitely save you money with his approach.


0

Option 1 A less expensive option if you don't mind having a plate behind the refrigerator is to put a 3 gang blank plate over the existing 3 gang switch box. Then feed out of it with the necessary wires to the other side. The electrical is pretty basic as all you would be doing is extending the switch loops/legs to the new 3 gang box. You do not ...


6

This is NOT okay. Use a multimeter (or voltmeter) to test the grounded (neutral) conductor, to see if you're getting the proper voltage between it and the ungrounded (hot) conductor. If it tests okay, wire the receptacle up the way it's supposed to. If not, you'll have to trace back through the circuit, and try to figure out what's wrong.


4

I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


3

Yes, that is precisely correct. Though I prefer red tape, but that's a preference, not a requirement to go buy a roll. Nicer (IMHO) because you can easily mark switched hots whether they be black or white.


1

An intermittent problem like that is almost always a broken switch or a loose connection. Often, you can "feel" when a switch is broken, so if it feels normal to you, then a loose connection might be the issue. Either way, you need to pull the switch out and check it out. If you are lucky and it is a loose wire, you'll just need to tighten the screw holding ...


2

According to National Electrical Code, the water piping must be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service (service "neutral"), the grounding electrode conductor (where large enough), or directly to one or more of the grounding electrodes. The bonding jumper is to be sized using Table 250.66. For 200 ampere service, ...


-3

Having a big ground does not matter if all the other wires are tiny because they will melt before the ground does. As long as the ground is bigger than any of the wires in the house, then it is sufficient. Usually the biggest wire is the one going to the oven or a dryer. The amperage rating of the box does not matter at all. For example, the box is 500 amps ...


1

You can buy connectors made specifically to join stranded and unstranded wires For example Wago lighting connectors can be used in nearly all electrical connections where a connection between solid and fine-stranded conductors is required for household and similar purposes in buildings. Applications can be, for example, automated blinds or awnings, ...


9

It's probably just a broken switch. My guess would be that the switch contact is worn out to the point that it does not make contact, but jiggling it a bit (by turning off and on again) may solve the problem, at least for a little while. Replacing a light switch is a pretty simple matter for a DIYer. I recommend swapping it out and seeing if that solves ...


2

It sounds like you are converting from a fan that did not have a remote control to one that does. In many older fan/light setups, power came to the wall switch with just two wires, hot (black) and neutral (white). There usually was also a ground wire, most commonly bare, but sometimes green. In many cases the incoming hot line was connected to two switches, ...


3

To do this properly, You'll likely have to run a new circuit. Since you haven't posted the make, model, or nameplates of the equipment, it's impossible to say for sure if these two devices can be on the same circuit. If they can, the solution is to extend the circuit using approved methods and materials. If they can't, the solution is to run a new circuit. ...


2

I started this as a comment on Speedy Petey's answer and ran out of room. He's completely correct. I was just going to comment that GFCI protection can be implemented with GFCI circuit breakers in the panel, in which case you would install regular receptacles, and protection extends to everything downstream from the GFCI device on the same circuit. The same ...


3

From the information that you gave so far it would seem pretty conclusive that the red wire has broken open between your test outlet box and the power panel. Did the red wire circuit outlets ever work? If they did work at one time can you think of any key events that may have occurred between them working and not working? Think about things like ...


0

For my switches to work, once I connected the blue wires for the lights together, I also had to connect those two blue wires to the black wire coming from the ceiling in order for the light to have power.


4

If this area is an unfinished area of a basement or crawl space then GFI protection is definitely required for ALL 120V, 15A & 20A receptacles. No exceptions, other than for fire or burglar alarm systems. The furnace must be dedicated and should NOT have a cord and plug. 2011/14 NEC 422.12 Central Heating Equipment Central heating equipment ...


1

Alway trun off the power. I use Klein Linemans/Pliers to twist the solid wires together, making sure that all the plastic covering of the wires line up. Next I strip the stranded wire, a little longer then the solid wire, and that the plastic covering of the wire lines up and twist the stranded wire around the solid wire with the pliers. Next using the ...


2

Is this for AC wiring (more permanent house wiring, that needs to meet code, or for something else? If I were you, I would look into wire nuts, they may be able to get it done the cheapest/most effective. Also check out the splices used in this question about grounding Grounding wires


5

If that was installed in 1958, the wire may or may not have PVC insulation. If it's the old rubber insulation, it's going to be brittle. Bending the wires could crack and compromise the insulation. Also, it's virtually guaranteed that there is no ground wire in that fixture. You should check local electrical code to make sure that replacing the fixture ...


2

The decision as to whether you have to remove and replace the existing light box rests on a number of factors. The electrical wire hookup to the existing light box appears that it may be under the access lid toward the rear part of the box in your picture. There will be a question as to whether the existing wiring will be long enough to make it to the ...


0

Inside that small access hatch in your picture you will likely find the original wire connections in a small box. Make sure that power is turned OFF either at the switch (tape the switch in the off position and put a note there so nobody turns it on while you are working) or at the circuit breaker/fuse panel. Open the access hatch and disconnect the power to ...


3

It sounds like the two black wire with the pigtail are the incoming hot and a branch hot to another location, such as the outlet. The other black attached to the switch is probably the switched hot that goes to the fixture being controlled. You can verify this by turning the switch to off, making sure all the wires and terminals are clear and not touching ...


2

It sounds like two of your red wires form a switch loop to one of your switches. The remaining red wire is the hot (I believe called active in Australia?) coming into your ceiling. By connecting them all together, you have wired your light (and switch) directly to your unswitched power, which is why it stays on. You'll need a multimeter, voltage tester, or ...


0

You'll need a transformer to step down mains voltage, to 24 volts that the thermostat can use. And you'll need a relay that can work with 24 volts. You'll wire it up something like this. When the thermostat calls for heat, the relay contact will be pulled closed. This will signal the fireplace to turn on. NOTE: the three contacts used on the ...


3

For anyone wanting the code reference as to why using a red (or black) conductor as a neutral is not allowed: 2014 National Electric Code 200.6 Means of Identifying Grounded Conductors. (A) Sizes 6 AWG or Smaller. An insulated grounded conductor of 6 AWG or smaller shall be identified by one of the following means: (1) A continuous white ...


0

A) Transformer. B) Relay or electronic relay, 24V in switching whatever on the output side.


3

What is the wattage rating of the switch? Many dimmers are 300 watts (or less if they are trimmed to fit in crowded boxes). You are burning 390 watts. You may be overloading the switch. Your instincts about LEDs is correct, assuming the switch is LED compatible. You also need to be sure to select dimmable LED bulbs.


4

Leave just enough "extra" wire to route the wire along the edge of the board so it looks clean like the image below. Otherwise, do not bother leaving extra wire. You can splice more wire within the panel if you need to move things around later. Leaving a lot of additional coiled wire to try to account for the future could result in excess heat build-up and ...


0

You are correct the Black or Color wire should be the hot/power and the white is the neutral, but as long as the wire is marked with black tape is was okay. Now you stated that you turned off the switch and you still had power at the fixture, that is because whom every wired this fixture may have switched the neutral and not the hot/power, which is no longer ...


6

So, the box in the ceiling has two pair coming into it. Two black white pair. One comes from the power source. Think of that one as Line and Neutral. The other one runs to the light switch wherever that is. ( If you open the switch, you should find a black and white on the two screws. ) Therefore, the two black wires are connected and beep your ...


1

Doesn't seem that strange at all. I'm not there, and can't probe the wiring to confirm, but this is a common wiring method when power comes to the fixture outlet first. Power comes to the fixture outlet on one of the black wires, then goes to the switch on the other. Power comes back from the switch on a white wire, and goes back to the breaker on the ...


3

I'd just install a small sub panel. What if you end up wanting another circuit for a fridge, or a ridiculous home entertainment system, or computer or music equipment, a small instant-on water heater, a handy outdoor outlet or two for electric yard tools or something else in the man cave? But my biggest excuse for suggesting the subpanel is that, as ...


2

What you are describing is called a Multi-wire Branch Circuit, and it is completely legal (given that it's done properly). The first problem, is that it doesn't should like the breakers feeding this circuit are handle tied together. It should be feed by a double pole breaker, or the two breakers handles should be tied together. You should not be able to ...


9

National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 1 General Article 100 Definitions Disconnecting Means. A device, or group of devices, or other means by which the conductors of a circuit can be disconnected from their source of supply. This can include a switch, a circuit breaker, a cord and plug connection (sometimes), or a group of the ...


5

Toggle switches can be used as disconnects (typically in cases like 225.39(A) below). A very literal interpretation of the code below would allow for properly rated toggle switches to serve as your disconnect if your circuits are being fed directly from your main panel (because a sub panel would negate the need for another disconnect), but in the case of ...


4

As far as I understand it, since the 2002 version of National Electrical Code, only a single branch circuit or feeder is allowed to supply a building (225.30). Though it's possible that your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) allows it under one of the exceptions, or there are local amendments. There's also the consideration that the NEC requires a ...


2

Extension cords are not supposed to be used for permanent fixtures. These fixtures are supposed to be hard wired or directly plugged into a permanent outlet. A common approach to solve this problem would be to install a switched outlet on the ceiling near the fluorescent lights. In many jurisdictions, you could use non-metallic cable to run the outlet and ...


0

You need four wires no 6 for 50 amps to 60. You might get away using three sixs and a eight if Your running 6 thnn copper. Thnn 6 copper will carrey the current up to about 180 feet 8 will not and is rated about 45 amps at a short run. And a ground Rod with a fifth wire by building with a ground rod to panel box on new building 8 feet in ground. But the code ...


1

I would double check how you are using your circuit finder. I use circuit finders all the time. They can be quite sensitive and can register on multiple breakers at the same time. That might explain why it led you to the wrong breaker. What I do to scan the panel is first I drag the finder across all the breakers. If it beeps on multiple ones, I try again ...


2

You may upgrade the breaker to 20 A if the wire is 12 AWG copper, but you may not if the wire is 12 AWG aluminum per Table 310.15(B)(16) (quote is from NEC:2011) -- Note, aluminum wiring for 12 AWG is uncommon in homes constructed within the past 30 years: You will also need to upgrade the outlet if it is the only receptacle on the circuit per ...


0

This really isn't that odd and yes you can replace them with GFCI's. It is common with multi-wire branch circuits, or in cases where one outlet is switched and another isn't. In the case of the black and red wire, one is hot and one is neutral. You can identify which one is hot with a multi-meter or non-contact tester (though NC testers can sometimes be ...


-1

In a 200amp main service most boxes have a jumper from neutral bar to ground. A wire makes a dead short. So everthing becomes one. If you put the ground wire on bus bar as close as you can it still seeing neutral so in english to a garage or a shed you run four wires to hots two nuturals. That balances out the load on two one ten lines equal current transfer ...



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