New answers tagged

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You can get away with running 12/2 and accomplish what you want to. Depending on the voltage current requirements of the lighting fixtures you might even be able to get away with 14/2. The biggest problem (as long as the lights don't draw more than 10-15 amps) is the voltage drop that can happen over long runs of wire. If you've already got the 12/2, go ...


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If you take one long 12/2 wire directly from the source to the switch and then connect from there to every receptacle, then it can all be done with 12/2. However, if you plan to take the wire from the breaker to an outlet first and then eventually the switch, you'd have to run 12/3 between everything but to the breaker and wire nut the hot together all the ...


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In some installations, there will be two switches for a fan - one for the fan and another for the light. The ceiling fan would have four wires (blue is common color for the 4th wire), and they are normally labeled Light, Fan, Common, and Ground. One wall switch will control the black wire, and the second switch will control red. Your new fan either ...


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As TFK mentioned, this is likely not going to be an easy task. It will surely require installing new wiring, and modifying the existing wiring. However, you have not provided anywhere near the detail required, for somebody on the other side of the internet to tell you how to do it. If you're not experienced with electrical work, you're likely going to have ...


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There are too many unknowns here for us to help you out. We don't know which switches you intend to use afterwards (locations), what access you have to joining the circuits together, or what the possibilities of joining them would be without knowing of your personal setup. Your setup, roughly as described to us is... <--- S --- S --- Kitchen Lights ...


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If this is a simple 115 volt system then running the wire from your switch is the wrong way of doing it unless the two wire power supply goes into the switch box to use. The answer telling you to extend the power and nutural wires plus ground from the light to the fan is the only way to control the light and fan together, that's a plus for Tester101


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The tab ( a little piece of metal that connects the two brass screws) on the hot side of the receptacle should be broke out of the new receptacle. (I assume when you say re-wiring you mean replacing receptacles. Then one brass screw gets an always hot wire (usually black) and the other brass screw gets the wire from the switch (could be black or red). If ...


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It sounds like you're looking to end up with something like this Notice the white wire that's been repurposed, is marked at both ends with black tape/marker/paint. And that the tab between the top and bottom receptacles, is broken on the "hot" side of the device. Also notice that a pigtail is used, instead of connecting more than one wire to a terminal on ...


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You need to swap the cord on your range for a 3-pin range cord (NEMA 10-50) and configure the bonding jumper appropriately, then install a NEMA 10-50 receptacle for your stove. (This is allowed for existing branch circuits, just not new ones.)


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There are two approaches to this problem: use dual pole switches to control the fan and each light simultaneously -- this is the best approach if the lights and fan all are on the same circuit from the panel use a dual relay to control the fan circuit from the light circuits -- this is the best approach if the fan and lights are on separate circuits, or if ...


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Maybe you CAN do this. You cannot send current up one cable and down another. Wires are grouped for a reason, so magnetic fields cancel out. Anything inside a loop of wire becomes the core of a toroid, which is much more powerful than you think, especially if there is any metal inside. Are you saying both 12/3’s power a circuit on their black wire, and ...


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You got it. Just make sure to separate the neutral and the ground on the dryer and use a 4-wire dryer whip and receptacle. Sounds like a plan. Good luck!


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You should definitely pull a new cable for the washing machine circuit. Problems with your solution You can't use a red wire as a neutral (See NEC 200.6(A)). Circuit conductors (wires) must be contained in the same "raceway, auxiliary gutter, cable tray, cablebus assembly, trench, cable, or cord" (See NEC 300.3(B)). You have not clearly described where ...


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This would be called a multi wire branch circuit. The circuit breaker for the red and black wires must be on adjacent circuit breakers for it to be legal. The red black also need to be identified so the wiring doesn’t get separated at a later date as that would undersize your neutral. This is legal because 1 wire is on L1 and 1 wire is on L2 the return ...


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Based on what you've provided, I made this diagram to go along with what all you will need for the new installation and how to accomplish it. This is the only working solution without first running a new neutral from the existing light down to the existing switch. You will have to pull power from the light, not from the switch. Also, as you had mentioned, ...


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If the wall switch only has 2 wires, it is called a switch loop. The closet light and switch cannot be extended from the current switch. The closet switch and light need a neutral, and that seems to end at the lighting fixture. If you can run a two wire cable from the fixture to the closet switch and then to the closet fixture, the setup is simple: Connect ...


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I'm a little confused by the dimmer switch based on your post, so hopefully you'll correct that and I'll finish this answer. However, to start you off on a new front that you might not have considered: go ahead and draw in 3-wire cabling between every item. You already know the layout that they have to be in and the maximum wires. Although it's for bonus ...


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I'd first check if someone incorrectly wired a single half switched receptacle. To do this, you're going to need to check the outlets for a hot and then determine how the circuit is run through the walls for the switch. Turn off the switch and check outlets to see if there's still a hot connection anywhere. I'd try with a non-contact tester first, and if ...


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The following assumes that only one switch controls the outlets. Turn the breaker off to the outlets. Confirm there is no power with an outlet tester. Remove the switch cover. Loosen the switch. Confirm there is no power to the switch using a no-contact tester. Remove the two wires attached to the switch (should be a combination of black, red or white). ...


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First, just to prevent any confusion, it's a "3-way" switch setup, not 2-way. 3-way switches take power in (or let it out) through a singular wire, which then is switched between two 'traveler' wires. It's referred to as a 3-way switch for the same reason as a 3-way intersection - there are 3 paths in/out of the switch. Next, you need to ensure that the ...


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also those NON-contact voltage detectors are all different, even identical model/brand. i've always found that alot of them detect voltage from 1-inch and greater distances. i've gotten lucky with a pair of Klien ones that won't detect until your actually touching the wires insulation. i recently bought a really nice looking one with a vibration motor and ...


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Typically there are two hot wires coming into a fan box that has separate switches for the fan and light kit. Typically the black is used for the fan, and the red is for the light kit. That said, other color combinations are possible. Typically, the blue wire from your fan/light combo supplies the light kit. Whichever of the two hot wires was connected to ...


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Thanks for the update. First, you have raw smarts but you are scattered, not able to describe what you want succinctly - and you seem to have no knowledge of code electrical, this stuff can kill you and burn your house down (with the lemons). You need to learn its pecularities (there are many) before you attempt to homebrew anything like this. Like I say, ...


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It is an OR device; not an XOR device. Direct connections to do this are a bad idea and I assume prohibited by code. An automatic transfer switch might work if this usage meets manufacturer specs and is allowed by code in your jurisdiction, but it is expensive just for this. I question whether it would be allowed by code and strongly suggest checking with ...


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Four-wire is used for "two-way" circuits, and for cases where two circuits are running to the same place (independent control of a ceiling fan and its lights, for example). In the US color coding conventions, red is the "second hot" needed for these applications.


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The code doesn't allow 240v circuits to have 120v loads on them. For instance putting a receptacle on a water heater or Air Conditioning circuit is not allowed. The heater needs to be moved to a separate two pole breaker sized at 125% of the heater load. A GFCI is not require for a space heater.


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Everything downstream of the GFCI has to be connected to both the Hot and Neutral from the Load side of the GFCI. The way you've wired it, when the heater kicks on, current is flowing from the Load side of the GFCI through the heater and back to the panel without returning through the GFCI's neutral connection, so the GFCI sees an imbalance and trips. I ...


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Am I allowed to add new sockets onto lighting circuit nowadays? Yes. Do I need to worry about lighting per square foot? Other than for your own personal preference since it's your own home, not really. Overloading the lights - well I only use LED lights, but someone in the future might stick something else in, right? What do I tell the ...


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According to Table 250.122 of the National Electrical Code, a 10 AWG copper conductor is fine as an equipment grounding conductor for circuits with up to 60 ampere protection. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 250 Grounding and Bonding 250.122 Size of Equipment Grounding Conductors. (A) General. ...


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dont know where you are but in scotland we dont have transfer switches,but i use a generater for the same reason mines is prob smaller and I move it from room to room so what i have done is put an earth wire from the machine and wired it to the earth pin in the plug so i just plug it into any socket and thats it earthed via the house supply.Dont know what ...


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Much obliged to those who gave answers and comments. They were all very useful. I ended up getting the manlift to work just fine by recharging its battery (there was only 1, it turns out) as if it were a car battery. It ended up working just fine. Thanks again for all your suggestions.


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First, are they wet cell lead-acid batteries? Most (but not all) lead-acid batteries in common use are either 6 volts or 12 volts. You can recharge a 12 volt battery in all the conventional ways you'd recharge a car battery. For 6 volt batteries, place 2 in series. You can also clean up the batteries and check electrolyte levels in the usual way. ...


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Yes and no, some testing is possible but it won't reveal all possible faults. What you can do with a multimeter You can measure the resistance of insulation but the test voltage will be low so certain types of fault will be missed. You can measure the resistance of conductive pathways (both those intended to carry current and those intended to be ...


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I had this problem a while back - simple, use a two gang 2-way switch and wire the fan up as if it was a 2-way lighting circuit, one switch controls the fan, the other controls the light - no backfeed, fans operate when needed (client will have no automatic control however, unless you install a flush PIR in between switch and fan) Dont forget your 3-pole ...


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It could be the charger is broke or one or more of the batteries has a dead cell(s). You could remove each battery and try to charge them one at a time. If any of them are seriously degraded they will fail to charge or not hold a charge. They may never get to more than 10 volts if they have a dead cell. Then you could replace the batteries and repair the ...


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C is the unswitched line from the transformer. 2 wires come from the transformer, look for the one that connects direcctly to one side of every load and find its terminal. The switched line is the other line from the transformer and goes to all the controls. Most systems use C. Trane/ American Std use B.


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In thermostat wiring, C stands for Common. Look for a terminal labeled Com, which is another abbreviation for common. I did not look up your thermostat, however it is likely that it needs the common wire to work properly. Many thermostats don't really need a common wire but it is almost always recommended to have one especially with these "smarter" ...


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You don't need a bulb at all to test the fixture. There should be one main "neutral", and one main "hot" wire coming out of the fixture. If there's more than one of each, you can tie each set all together, or test each one individually. The following procedure assumes a single "hot", and single "neutral". First, set the multimeter to test continuity , or ...


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If it is for incandescent lamps there is little that can go wrong with it but if you screw a good lamp into each socket and use your multimeter in continuity or ohms you should be able to test each socket individually. The resistance of a 40 watt 120 volt lamp is about 360 ohms. Without any lamps screwed in you should get ~infinite resistance or no ...


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Multimeter probably isn't going to tell you much For a light fixture that takes incandescent bulbs, about the only thing that you can do is put known-good bulbs in the fixture and measure the resistance between the two wires. If there is infinite resistance, the wiring connections are bad somewhere, and if the resistance is lower than the resistance of a ...


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Well, I just came upon this similar kind of problem yesterday, and had a whole afternoon-evening struggle on finding the problem's cure. So I write my own solution here as I, or others might encounter the same problem again later. (Ungrounded electrical outlets in the room, Creative t6100 5.1 system, connected to PC via integrated Realtek soundcard, Win10) ...


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Make sure that the nuetral wire is isolated. In other words the nuetral wire servicing that gfci only serves that outlet and is not shared with or wire nutted together with another. The electrical storm may have slightly damaged something on a circuit that shared the same nuetral. Just a thought.


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At the end of the day it's about safety. So it pays to account for the user's force-of-will. If a code violation of one type or another is inevitable, it is a matter of least harm. My first read of "Continuous outer covering" was "more than the usual band of black tape you find on switch loops", e.g. covering the wire with many spiraling loops of ...


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To my understanding, no. 250.119 Identification of Equipment Grounding Conductors. Unless required elsewhere in this Code, equipment grounding conductors shall be permitted to be bare, covered, or insulated. Individually covered or insulated equipment grounding conductors shall have a continuous outer finish that is either green or green with one ...


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For whomever does this again: I've found it easier to fish monofilament pull line: Tie a large loop it in, tape it to your fishing pole, and retreive it the attic with stick with a hook on it (breaking the tape). Now tie your wire to the other end of the fishing line and pull.


2

What I ended up doing was ditching the fishing rod all together and taping a long piece of magnet to the end of the wire I was running with electrical tape. And on the other side, using a 6 foot long stick and taping about 3 magnets together with electrical tape at the end and I was able to attach the 2 magnets together. This allowed me to draw the wire ...


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If you were to attach something similar to the end of the wire such as a hex nut that would not easily slip off then you could make up a remote noose on the end of a long stick that looks like this. (proverbial back of envelope sketch) Aim the stick down into the tight corner of the attic and lower the noose over the end of the wire with the hex nut. ...


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****This answer pertains to wire color coding for North American electrical Standards.**** You can re-wire the fan to make it simple. The fan will have to be opened-up at the ceiling cover-plate. Most wiring for ceiling fans are such that the blue wire from the FAN powers the light. This should be presently connected to the HOT (black) from the switch. ...


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Are the breakers adjacent? If so, you're probably looking at a multi-wire branch circuit which should--but doesn't--have an approved tie-bar device between the two breakers, and which would use one neutral for both sides of the circuit. Multi-wire branch circuits are safe when both branches are powered and when both branches are off. They can in some ...


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I realize this is old, but I want to share my experience with these fixtures. They make conversion kits, but I couldn't find one large enough to cover the old 14" square fixture. I made my own conversion kit out of a 16" wood circle with a ceiling electrical box mounted in the center. I removed the old socket and hardware from the recessed box. There was ...



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