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0

The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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Colors of the wires is misleading, in reality there are but 2 sides or legs of 24 volt power, The "Hot leg" Red, and the "Neutral leg" Common. Common is called this because every 24 volt circuit terminates upon it to complete its circuit.


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The Nest says Common need not be wired up usually, however it often is required to work correctly and charge the stat up.


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The below are all you have to worry about, Yellow need not be wired to Y at the air handler as it is a dummy trminal for convenience, many simply run Y from the stat to the AC unit outside bypassing the Y terminal on the air handler.


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See below, if you jumper Yellow to White the heat strips will run in both cool and heat as Yellow is energized in both modes, what makes it a cooler or heater is the O being energized in cool mode Rheems use the B terminals to be energized in heat.


1

The YELLOW or Y terminal at the furncae/ air handler is a dummy terminal for convenience, it is not required to be used, you could send Yellow directly to the AC unit out doors. Common will be used since the Common leg of power comes from the transformer which is in the furnace. The Yellow going to common likely if you trace it back it in fact is ...


0

You will wire the cooling transformer to RC and the heat transformer to RH


0

The wires from the ceiling box are probably a "hot" wire (black), a neutral wire (white), a ground wire (copper), and a switched-hot (red)(see description here). On the fan you probably have a neutral (white), a "hot" lead for the motor and a "hot" lead for the light that is not there (blue & black). Most fans can be equipped with light kits so they ...


0

Absolutely do not leave the wires alone wrapped in electrical tape. Electrical tape does not have enough longevity to safely protect the exposed leads and can create a hazard in the future. The blue wire exists to support the future addition of a light. The polite thing to do for your future self or future owner of your home would be to connect the blue and ...


0

Green to green, white to white. Assuming you have a two gang switch (two switches at wall, only one used). Blue and Black from fan connected either to the red or black wire from wall. Other wire needs to be wire capped. The black wire from the fan is the hot for the fan motor, the blue is for an optional light kit.


3

I've labeled some things in your photo, that might help you understand what's going on. The wires coming up into the panel are your service conductors, of which you have two "hot" and one "neutral". From there you have "hot" branch-circuit conductors, which are connected through circuit breakers. There's also a branch-circuit "neutral", for each branch ...


0

To directly answer your question, yes, the neutral should be connected form the meter to the same bus as the individual circuits in the apartment for conventional breakers, which only switch the hot (black) wires. For GFCI or AFCI breakers, the neutral/white wire connects to the breaker, which has its own lead to connect to the neutral bus.


2

I am not sure I understand the intent of your question. The neutral wire is not metered. It just passes through the meter box. Old electric meters don't have a connection to it at all. Electric meters monitor both hot legs and add up the kilowatt hours based on current flow through those. photo source. The only remarkable thing I see in your photo is ...


1

Remember that power runs from source, thru meter, to breaker box. That isn't power to meter, it's power FROM meter (two phases, red and black). It makes perfect sense to me that neutral too would be drawn from the main box thru the meter box to the apartment box. I don't see anything questionable here.


5

No, in a situation like this absolutely not. The breaker in this case would need to be 15A. Question is, WHY? Why use #14 wire when the circuit is already #12? Stick with what is there and keep the breaker 20A. In some cases, such as in a kitchen, laundry or bath, you'd be creating a violation doing it like you show in that diagram. And don't be confused ...


-1

This is way late for OP, but previous answers claimed that a double-gang box was required to allow a NEC code-approved "barrier" plate between the high- and low-voltage. Some vendors do make a single gang box option where the box contains an internal divider and you use a special divided receptacle. One example can be seen here: ...


0

It just seems like you have two 3-wire cables (with constant and switched hots) going into and out of that box, along with a 2-wire constant feed. It's not two circuits. The reds are switched and the blacks are constant hot. IMO I would pigtail each color and use the side screws on the receptacle just like they were before. That looks like #12 so you can ...


1

As far as I recall, the main differences are using appropriate metal screws to attach (standard) boxes, and using bushings (should be either provided with framing or easily available from the framing supplier or an electrical supplier) to protect wires passing through the framing. This guide from "steelframing.org" might be a helpful read.


0

IMO it makes absolutely NO sense to use an existing circuit, especially considering how taxed they are. As long as your panel will accept tandem breakers what is the issue? Also, with a house of this vintage I highly doubt the wiring is grounded, which you cannot extend. And do not assume if the wiring is old AC/MC cable that it is grounded, much of it from ...


4

It looks like the owner has set up the entire house for phone using only one pair of wires from each cat5 cable, which is fine. I like the plywood switchboard. It's very configurable if not pretty. And it's tidy, so I expect you'll hear about it if you monkey around with it too much. Those beige boxes are RJ11 jacks just like you said. It looks like ...


4

The yellow cables are probably Cat5e, which has 4 pairs of wires. (The beige cables are probably Cat 3, which might only have 2 pairs of wire). A single phone line only requires 1 pair, so as you can see the other pairs are just twisted off. You definitely can reuse the cable for ethernet access, but you will lose the phone jack obviously. Here are some ...


3

The beige boxes are standard surface mount telephone jacks. Disconnecting them will disable the phone jacks in the house (which you say you mostly aren't using). The easiest way to splice the ends would be to Terminate the ends with an RJ-45 connector, and then use a coupler to connect the two wires. If you are trying to connect more than two of the ...


1

It's not the size of the kitchen - it's the fact that it's a kitchen. Run the coffeemaker, toaster and microwave, perhaps the waffle iron, fire up the mixer to beat the waffle batter... Even with limited counter space I'd consider 2-3 receptacles a bit under-populated for a kitchen these days. Consider using a larger box and putting a pair at each location, ...


1

Looking at the actual code... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits 210.11 Branch Circuits Required. (C) Dwelling Units. (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere ...


1

It certainly seems like you have a ground fault somewhere. Is it possible there is water damage anywhere inside the garage? Since you've already replaced the GFCI, I think it's safe to assume it's working properly and is tripping as it's designed to. That means somewhere current from the hot or neutral wires is leaking to the ground wire or somewhere else. ...


0

I've done this. I have a great solution. Simply take the hot circuit to the sensor and to the light switch and run them in parallel. The only downfall is that you won't be able to turn the light off when the sensor has control. But I haven't found this to be a problem.


0

If your insurance company told you to replace it, you should have negotiated any terms before doing so. I rather doubt they did. If an electrician told you to replace it, that's called "selling a product with fear, uncertainty and doubt" and the "selling" part should have been obvious from the "paid a lot of money to do so" part of the transaction. If you ...


2

I'll bet the "insurance company" did not write to you with You must replace your service panel because it is dangerous. More likely, that message was delivered orally. The actuaries would love for you to reduce their risk at your expense. If your policy or another written document from the insurance company or your state insurance commission says anything ...


2

I'd have to say no way. There were never any recalls on FPE panels or breakers, and regardless of their reputation it is not mandatory to have them replaced. You can always try to put a claim in saying the panel was damaged or something, but I don't think you're going to get anyone to pay for this for you. Besides, you are bordering on insurance fraud with ...


1

Start by turning off the power at the breaker, and verifying it's off with a non-contact voltage tester. Connect all the bare or green grounding conductors together. Connect the white wire from the ceiling to the white wire on the input side of the remote receiver module and the white wire in the fan. Connect the black wire from the ceiling to the black ...


1

I'm no code expert but as I understand it, yes if you use fire caulk as per exception #2 in 713.3.1 and you are going to surface mount the switch on the drywall in the garage. 713.3 Fire-resistance-rated walls. Penetrations into or through fire walls, fire barriers, smoke barrier walls and fire partitions shall comply with Sections 713.3.1 through 713.3.3. ...


-1

Looks like heat. You say it is sticky so maybe it is residue from the insulation. The cable can get hot if you are running a heavy load on it. If the receptacle is a long way from the circuit breaker the breaker might not trip with an overload. You can check for heating by plugging in the normal load and then check to see if the cable is hot. Loose ...


6

That is tar from the old insulation, that's why it is sticky. I don't know why or how it happens, but old insulation had tar in the paper, and it is very common. It is not scorching or melting from overheating. Take a utility knife and try to gently scrape some of the black away. You should see it's just on the surface. It's nothing to worry about.


0

I can't speak to the laptop cords, but your lamp cords are guaranteed replaceable even if they turn out not to be repairable. If the chewing happened down near the plug your job is super easy. The wikipedia electrical wiring article includes a lot of terminology that you might find helpful. Can you cut out a length of wire and re-attach the plug assembly? ...


1

For repairing lamp/laptop/zip style cords, you have this option: Separate the two wires and cut the bad spots out. Slip small shrink tube over each wire. Slip larger shrink tube over both wires. Solder the wires together. Shrink the small tube first, then the large tube. Use this method if the cord would be too short if you just replaced the plug end.


0

Generally, it should never hurt anything to use thicker wire, assuming that you can make solid connections. The wire should never be the limiting factor! The system should already be fused so that #18AWG won't melt, so #14 will only help. Wire nuts and tape is a tried and true method, although some would argue that soldering and heatshrink is better. You ...


2

Proper connection of a two-way circuit is (sorry about the ASCII sketch) sw1 sw2 load _________________ hot ____/ ______()_____ neutral _________________ / ... two single-pole, double-throw switches back to back. When both are switched one way (up in this case), one of the wires between ...


7

This is perfectly normal. One of the two travelers can be hot at all times if the switches are wired correctly. Which traveler is hot depends on the orientation of the switches. That said, you shouldn't touch any wire in a circuit box when the branch is live. If you happened to have provided a better ground path, someone else very well could have been ...


1

Definitely sounds like either breakers/fuses/main power were left turned off, or he did something that caused breakers to trip or fuses to blow, or he damaged the wiring in some other way. Breaker/fuse box is the first thing to check. If that isn't it... he touched it last, he didn't get you to confirm that everything was working properly before he left, ...


1

Is there a C wire at the thermostat? You should measure between R and C for a proper voltage reading. Y connects back to the other side of the transformer through the coil of the contactor, in the condensing unit. G connects back to the other side of the transformer through the coil in the fan relay, in the air handler. C connects directly back to the ...


2

A 30A connection will require a much heavier wiring connection than either 12 AWG or 14 AWG. It is common that a 40A or 50A cord is used to hook up a range unit. These can be purchased in several lengths with molded on plugs at the end. As always make sure that your outlet, wiring back to the entrance panel and the circuit breakers are sized properly for ...


1

You should re-feed this fan from a lighting circuit or other 15A circuit. A ceiling fan CANNOT be supplied from a kitchen or DR receptacle circuit. Whoever did this was clueless with regard to codes and proper wiring.


0

I find it a little puzzling that you have a modern panel inside your home and a separate fuse box dedicated to the dryer. Confirm that this is the case - double check your modern panel to see if you've overlooked a 220v circuit that has tripped. If it is a simple tripped circuit, reset it. If it happens again call an electrician to find out why. ...


0

This is what I'd do: Leave the terminal of the capacitor which is connected to the supply as it is. The other terminal is connected to one end of the winding. This needs to be disconnected and connected to the other end of the winding.


1

Sometimes the breaker boxes will have a large Main Disconnect switch separated from the others. If so, it should disconnect all power, including to your secondary breaker box. Even if you have a main disconnect, you can never be sure how it was wired. So, if you do have one, use your meter to make sure that the feeds to the secondary breaker box are, in ...


5

Call an electrician immediately that panel doesn't look safe. It looks like someone with some electrical knowledge attempted to do some work, that is definitely not to code and should be fixed properly immediately.


2

You can have multiple circuits in the same box so long as you do not overload the volume of the box with devices and wires. See this answer by @Tester101 that discusses box volume.



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