New answers tagged

1

Just use outlet box #1 as both a junction box & outlet box. Having enough room in the box shouldn't be a problem, but you can always get a deeper box if desired. Wire nut the supply to another 14/2 running to the switch. Then, you'll run a new 14/2 back to outlet box #1 to power the outlet. Finally, simply run another 14/2 from outlet #1 to outlet #2. ...


2

It's worse than tester101 says. Each circuit may not see half, there may be an imbalance of currents between the redundant paths. (Especially if one has a problem, such as being completely broken). Now how are the wires protected from overload? The hots have rather nice breakers on them, but the neutrals are not breaker protected! Nothing will detect an ...


1

If you have enough wire to have 6" from the back of the junction box where you tie in a junction box would be the easiest way. Most of the time the wires are tight. then there are 2 options. #1 to pull the wire down from the outlet to your box using the wire to pull a string or the new NM cable down to the box some times the easiest is to pull a string when ...


1

Phone quickie answer: Tester101‘s method is the conventional one. Her are some potentially cost saving alternatives. If you need 120/240 and don't want to run new cable, you could obtain a (perhaps used) 12KVA or larger outdoor rated transformer and install this as a new main service. 5KVA would suffice if you changed the supply breaker from 50A to ...


4

With a 120/240V single split-phase system, there are two possible outcomes. Separate legs If the branch circuits feeding the device are on separate legs of the service, then the tab will be creating a direct short-circuit between the legs. This will cause a high current through the circuits, which should trip one of the breakers fairly quickly. Same ...


5

Try using an 11b extension ring or a 1900 extension ring. Actually made to deepen a junction box, but should work for this application.


1

Sounds like they're trying to use the earth as a neutral, which in the US is not allowed. If the wires are through conduit, and the conduit is large enough, you can simply pull two more conductors. If the wires are in a cable, or the conduit is too small. You'll want to pull a new four wire cable, or four conductors through a larger conduit. To ...


0

*Not an electrician, just my layman's understanding: 1) Yes you should have two hots and a neutral, unless (and this is highly unlikely) your sub panel is on a single phase, in which case you could have 1 hot 1 neutral but that would be wrong wiring of a sub-panel to begin with. You actually should probably also have a ground so 4 wires to the panel. 2) ...


0

A disconnected wire will pick up voltage inductively, like an antenna. If you've ever built one of those crystal AM radios out of thin wire and a toilet paper roll, you know inductive energy can drive tiny loads like a very sensitive earpiece. Or a modern digital voltmeter. But it isn't good for much more. Connect any sort of load to it, even a simple ...


0

Both a non contact tester and a voltmeter will show voltage on a disconnected wire that is running parallel to a hot wire. Using A load like a light bulb put on the red wire to neutral will take the voltage closer to 0. If there truly is a short from another hot wire to the red the bulb will light. If the bulb lights the short could be in any junction box or ...


1

You can't have one switch operate light OR fan. Many jurisdictions absolutely require that a switch on the wall near a room entrance, control a lamp. That is to benefit house guests and mainly from the government's perspective, first responders. There's an exception to allow a switched outlet instead, presuming a person is going to plug a floor lamp into ...


0

Which are the wires coming from the control box from the dishwasher and which are coming from your breaker? I'd imagine the black & white are coming from the dishwasher. If that's the case (I may be wrong here) can't you just test the two white wires coming from your panel to see which is hot? Touch the tester to the copper head of each wire (be very ...


1

That looks like a standard appliance cord. Look closely at the cord and you will notice one conductor is ribbed. Follow it... It should lead to the neutral side of the plug and the white wire on the dishwasher. The ribbed side being neutral is an industry standard, if the plug is molded on to the cord it will follow this convention. You are correct about ...


0

Sounds like the power is trying to find a neutral and thats the residual you are getting. Dead leg. Does your switch interrupt the common(hot) and then feed the lights. I wired lights once interrupting the neutral instead and electricity will seek out a ground/neutral (air, back feed, etc...). Should take power from source(breaker box) to a junction box, at ...


-1

You can. But your total electrical may now be too much. It depends on your service capacity.


2

In an ideal world -- these would be identical, and from a purely electrical standpoint, they basically are. But, we live in the real world, where connections have parasitic resistance and badly made connections can do naughty things while in the process of falling apart due to vibrations etal. The heatshrunk-over splice can be very good or very bad -- a ...


1

You can't hang 30A circuits off a 60A breaker. The only thing you can do with a 60A breaker - is run wire rated for 60A, to serve a device rated to draw 60A. One possible device is a sub-panel. I gather from your other answer, that you're dealing with panels whose breakers are not available at any sane price or reliability, so changing breaker size is ...


3

Bottom line: The breaker MUST be sized to be equal to or less than what the wire permits in ADDITION to what the manufacture of the appliance says to use.* The breaker can NOT be greater than what the wire permits. Period. #10 gauge size wire is sized for at most 30 Amps. Therefore, at most a 30A breaker should be used. Most washers require no ...


2

Others have discussed the code requirements, so I'll answer from a physics point of view: The only real concern is that some models of dishwasher use a significant amount of power. As such, if you're planning to use the outdoor socket for more than light-duty work when the washer is running, the circuit may not have enough capacity for your needs. If it's ...


0

Based on your diagram, it appears as though it should be wired like this... Notice that the white wire to the switch, has been marked with black tape/marker at both ends. This signifies that it's being used as an ungrounded (hot) conductor. When hooking up the GFCI, make sure you use the LINE terminals. If you use the LOAD terminals, the device will ...


1

When wiring with cable, and the feed is coming to the light, the standard is to feed a single pole with the white wire (the code requires this) and return with the black wire. If you connect the white wire to the other white wires at the light fixture you create a dead short when the switch is closed this would trip the GFCI if you are downstream from it. ...


4

The 2014 NEC now requires the dishwasher to be on GFCI. The 2014 NEC does not require the dishwasher to be on an individual circuit (it never has). So, you could feed either receptacle on the load side of the other with a GFCI. Or you could put the whole circuit on a GFCI breaker. If your locality is still on the 2011 NEC the GFCI requirement was not in ...


2

I'd have no concerns about doing so assuming the exterior outlet is a GFCI and it's fairly well protected from the elements. Even if it does get wet and trip the dishwasher will remain in service. I'm not aware of any codes that this would violate, but I'm not a NEC encyclopedia like some of our members.


1

If this is a new outlet run take all 3 wires to the switch box the white wire nutted together white to white. The ground you will want to pig tail a ~6" piece to the switch green screw. The black is put on the switch (I usually put the hot on top) and feed the outlet on bottom. Just an FYI Garbage disposals are notorious for eating GFCI's so it may be a good ...


2

As it sounds like it's an electronically commutated motor (ECM). My advice is to grab the control board, blower, and transformer out of the furnace. Then connect everything up as it was in the furnace. You should then be able to use the R and G thermostat terminals, to turn the fan on and off. You will have to bypass any limit circuits on the board, but ...


0

A plug in electrical tester will show voltage and let you know you have power there, but it will not show amperage. So if you have a loose wire connection or a wire break under the insulation on one of your receptacles that feed the others, you will see voltage, but if you plug a light in or something else that will draw some amperage, the voltage drops due ...


0

The cheapie 3-light testers work by connecting 3 lamps in a triangle fashion across the 3 outlet pins. The hot-neutral lamp works in the obvious way. The hot-ground lamp works if the ground pin can find a path back to neutral, presumably via a ground wire correctly bonded to neutral in the panel. But not necessarily. It sounds like the UPS is connecting ...


0

If this installation has only a single switch for the light (not a 3 way or coming on automatically with the garage door opening). I think it is likely that power was fed to the light fixture first where the black incoming was nutted together with the black to the garage door opener and the black wire to the switch, the white from the power wire nutted to ...


2

Possibly. They do make gadgets designed to control a ceiling fan + light separately, using wiring meant for a light only (which is your case even though it's a fan only). They include a control module which goes behind the fan shroud, and an intelligent light switch. The module doesn't care if the fan and light are separate items. They also make lights ...


2

Pictured is not a legal splice. Legal crimps are expensive mainly due to the cost of the crimp tool - if you can find someone to loan you a tool, that might make all the difference in the world, but I wouldn't get my hopes up. And the other permitted methods are rather difficult to pull off (for us mortals). In practical terms, most people I know simply ...


0

This is not a kludge, he took 2 hots off 1 circuit. To add an outlet tie the white for the outlet to the white in the lamp box. tie the grounds (copper wires together). Now tie your black to the red. connect the black to the outlet brass colored screw, white to the silver screw and copper to green screw on the outlet.


1

Open up the switch box, and have a look how it's wired. Without more information (photos, diagrams, etc.), the following information is an educated guess. One of the colored lines (red, black) is likely always hot, while the other is controlled by the switch. The white is most probably neutral, and the bare/green is almost certainly ground. If this is the ...


-2

The easiest thing to do is to go to Home Depot and buy a grounding rod. They're about 6 foot long or so. Buy the grounding rod nut: it's an oval shaped brass nut with a bolt or screw in it. Then drive the grounding rod into the ground very close to the grounding wire with 3 inches of rod protruding from the ground, and then use the grounding rod nut and ...


6

Here is what the National Electrical Code says: 250.64 Grounding Electrode Conductor Installation. Grounding electrode conductors at the service, at each building or structure where supplied by a feeder(s) or branch circuit(s), or at a separately derived system shall be installed as specified in 250.64(A) through (F). (C) Continuous. Except as ...


2

For conduit, fish tape is choice. But for residential remodeling, PEX is so much better! I've used 3/4" and 1/2" PEX pipe many times as fish tape for electrical remodeling (1/2" is usually preferable). I prefer PEX to fish tape because you can move PEX side to side in the wall void; the stiffness allows you to push PEX more quickly; it doesn't get hung up as ...


8

The common practice for future expansion is to install the box and put a blank cover on it. That eliminates the requirement of chopping into the drywall to find the wire. It also eliminates the need to create as-built documents and store them for future reference so you can find the wires later. My recommendation is to install device boxes with ENT ...


1

I would sell this kit and go with another one that is compatible with LED lighting and your wiring scheme. This one is not. If you're not into that ... Looking at the manual for this 45607 dimming 3-way... each smart device needs always-hot (which I show as black here), neutral and ground, which is fairly typical of smart devices. They need power ...


2

There is no rule in the UK preventing you from putting central heating and sockets on the same circuit (which may or may not be a ring). In my experiance a dedicated circuit for central heating is the exception not the rule. I'm not sure why you would want to make it into a ring, making it into a ring would mean adding an extra cable which would seem to ...


1

Updating this for posterity and to share our solution. Background -- 4 pin cfls with Sylvania Quicktronics residential series ballast, QTR 1x26T4 (120v). 6 can lights on the same switch. Same bad behavior as the OP -- some lights came on; others didn't in a totally random fashion. On the possibility that there were simply too many lights on that circuit, ...


1

It sounds like you do not have a neutral at either of the current 3-way switches. This was common in the past, although new wiring now requires a neutral at every switch. The white wire in old 3-way setups is usually the common wire, either carrying line hot to the switch or carrying hot to the fixture after the second switch. If so, the white wire was ...


1

Does this sub panel need a grounding wire connected to the main panel in the garage? Yes, you need a 4 wire connection (2 legs hot, neutral, and ground) from the main to the sub panel. Also the sub needs to be grounded, as you have planned two ground rods you are all set there. I agree with Ed Beal that in the case of electrical panels, bigger is ...


5

That Federal Pacific panel has to go as they are dangerous. As far as concerns about your skill, you sound like that particular kind of newbie who is well capable of learning to do it all safely and well; however my hunch is you are still thinking too much, and need to read a little more. It's OK, we all start there. Normally, just replacing a sub panel ...


2

You can't pull a single wire out of NM cable, because the single wire is not labeled for use individually, not even in conduit. Single-strand THHN/THWN is labeled, but you can't just slapdash it next to the NM wire for several reasons, the first is it doesn't have a jacket like the NM. Also it is not routed together with the neutral so it will introduce ...


3

I am a licensed Oregon electrician and it IS 100% legal to do your own wiring including planning. It needs to meet code or it will not pass inspection. First I would never update to a new panel for a home with a 100A even as a sub. I would put in at least a 150A panel with more breakers, the cost difference is not that big. 100A is the minimum size allowed ...


1

Perhaps I could be wrong on this but when I worked as an electrician in California many years ago, the coast 3 way switching was developed for the following reason. Many homes and offices were wired using steel flex (aluminum came later). Most cities in California at that time had their own electrical code, governed to some degree by the state code and NEC. ...


1

When someone does a light fixture replacement with switches involved and has a problem, it is usually because they reconnected the white wire that feeds power to a switch back to the other whites thinking it is a neutral. Then they connect the black to the hot feed throw the switch and it trips the breaker because it is now a dead short. When using cable ...


2

There's no such thing as too many wires between the bathroom switch and the bathroom light/fan/heatlamp/whatever the future may bring. I would run at least 3 hots and a neutral, with 1 hot and 1 neutral being 12ga for a high current device. Even better, install conduit and pull whatever as needed. I personally hate fans which turn on with the light. I ...


7

Sounds like white (neutral) isn't connected somewhere. Find it and fix it!


4

Your problem is that you have looped/paralleled the neutral (white) wire both through and around the 3-way switches, which can be interpreted as a NEC 300.3(B)/310.10(H) violation. What I would do instead is run a 14/4 between the two 3-way switches, with black as the unswitched hot and red and blue as the travelers, then run a 14/3 from the 2nd switch box ...



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