Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

If you can run the Ethernet to the basement through the cable box, why not just do that? Both the co-ax and the Ethernet cables are low voltage. There's no problem running them together in the same box and/or conduit. If you run the Ethernet cable exposed along the wall, it won't cause data transmission problems, but it won't be attractive and you'll have ...


0

If the flooring has has trim it is very easy to shimmy off just enough to drill a 1/4" hole for the cable. You can the leave as is or be more professional and cut in a box and snake the cable back around to it. ( requires you to know how to make cat5 connections ) But otherwise yes perfectly fine to run along a brick wall. Just might break down faster ...


1

There are cable clamps available that have nails suitable for masonry walls


0

A mercury thermostat is basically just a mercury tilt-switch on the end of a coil which moves/tilts it in response to temperature changes. Typically it's used to open or close a low-voltage/low-current circuit, which operates a relay, which in turn operates the controlled load. That avoids any risk of the high-voltagge circuit being exposed at the ...


1

You'll need two wires. One wire (R) that comes from the transformer, and one (G) that powers the fan relay.


1

There may be an in-ceiling connector as well as the connections which are certainly in the tape, but if you cannot pull a connector down by gently pulling on the wires, and if you cannot access the ceiling space, then the following will work. (1) BEST: Get somebody competent to assist or to do the job - you have less chance of dying that way. Otherwise: ...


4

Alright there are two options. 1.Either your light was fed power from the panel (or a plug etc...) first. OR The light switch box was fed power first and your light has two cables in it because it goes to another light after that one. You need to first figure out where your strait hot power is coming in from. I understand that you believe you have ...


0

If the fan is controlled by a 3-way switch, you'll have to replace either of the switches with another 3-way switch. Unless you eliminate one of the 3-way switches, you can't install a single pole switch. If you want to install a fan speed control switch in this scenario, you'll have to find one that can be wired as a 3-way switch (not sure if it exists).


0

Just the hot. Just switch the hot.


0

There's a lot going on here, and I think we could spend a lot of time drawing out the threads of this design and implementation; however, to answer your specific questions: No, current will not flow back through a device from the neutral in any but the most pathological circumstances, for two reasons. First, it is incumbent upon the builder to ground all ...


0

I am doing the exact same thing. Most likely your local (fire) code authority (AHJ) will specify that you need to have your fire sprinkler flow alarm integrated with your smoke detectors (but not your CO detectors, because that makes sense -not-). And all of those have to report to a UL certified central dispatch station. Some AHJ's (very small towns) will ...


0

You are FINE with this. What you are proposing is a good way less than a 20A circuit could handle in this type of setting. Personally I'd go with #14 on a 15A breaker for loads like this.


1

There should be no problem putting it all on a single 15 ampere circuit. Likely in the worst case scenario, each fixture would consume ~100 watts. That would be using large 52" fans, and 100 watt bulbs in each fixture. With the 10 fixtures, that would be 1000 watts (10 * 100 = 1000). A 15 ampere 120 volt circuit can provide 1800 watts of power (15A * 120V). ...


1

So it sounds like you have the wrong number of wires for your switch to have ever worked properly by your description, from the way that I read it. SO I will try to understand. When you took off your three way switch was there three screws with three wires going to it? Plus perhaps your box is metal and has a bare ground screw at the back, or a bare ground ...


3

Just don't -- you can't "panel over" boxes and make them inaccessible as a result and you must have at least one receptacle installed and hot on a 24" by 12" or larger peninsula.


0

You should be able to simply wirenut like colors together inside each box, but there is a critical caveat to that: you must have GFCI protection on your kitchen circuits. I'm guessing these two outlets are the first outlets on each of the two required circuits for the kitchen, so you will then have to replace the GFCI protection - most likely by replacing ...


1

Be careful when reading residential voltage with a DVM meter. My Fluke will read 121VAC at a single pole switch with the switch On, and 50vac with it off. But the scale changes from V to mv (milivolts). The scale changes dynamically and the v in milivolts on my Fluke is very small. 50-60mv is typical voltage float on ground. I have never measured a true ...


-2

I really don't know why you couldn't. If the switch is made for residential use for that purpose I don't see why not. They said it was against the building code? Not the electrical code? I could not see why the carpenters would care what the electricians did (building code versus electrical code).


0

Maximum number of devices on a breaker is 12. So you pass the first rule with only having 10 items. Also number 12GA for a 15 amp breaker works as well. If your ceiling fans are not some crazy ones. It's fine on one circuit. I have never checked how many amps they draw cause its never very much, and i have never heard of it being a problem. Each 60W light ...


0

The question is a bit long for me to follow fully but I will say that on a 120V circuit you are not aloud to switch the neutral. It is a code rule. You always switch the hot, never the neutral. I am not sure if your whole circuit is 120V but theres a part answer for you.


0

Agreed that you need to verify the light is not working first by switching the light bulb with a known working light bulb. If that doesn't work is there another 3 way switch that is off now that you didn't know you had? That was switched off by somebody else since you didn't know it existed. Can this light only be turned on and off from the one location (i ...


3

Orision, My take on this is that you understand what you want pretty well, and understand electricity only at a very surface level. That's not a great mix. My suggestion would be for you to do some googling on home automation products and see if you can come up with a way to set up a system that accomplishes this with off the shelf home automation products ...


0

First, are you sure that 30A is a sufficiently large breaker for your range circuit? Most electric cooking appliances (freestanding electric ranges, cooktop/oven combinations) require a 40A or a 50A circuit. The 20A breakers do sound correct for the lighting and receptacle circuits, although you will need more of them, as every dwelling unit must have at ...


0

Yes and no (or is it no and yes?) The minimum wire gauge at household and light commercial voltages (less than 600V) indeed does not depend on the voltage -- the first entry in NEC table 310.106(A) specifies that 14AWG copper or 12AWG aluminum is usable all the way up to 2000V when suitably insulated. However, in high-voltage work (upwards of 2kV), the ...


2

That will work. Code depends on where you live, but I can't see anything wrong with making the junction away from the switch. You might have issues doing all this in the fan box. It might be cleaner to put a small box in the ceiling and do your connections, then have a small run down to the fan. And be smart with placement of recessed lighting above a ...


1

How about dropping the cover at the top of the fan and if the neutrals are all connected together (suggesting a single supply) - disconnect the fan wire from whatever it's connected to and reconnect to whatever the lamp is connected to. - Cap off the wire(s) you disconnected from the fan wire. now turning on the light will turn on the fan.


0

From the small part of the valve that is visible, it looks like an Irritrol 2400 (the same as my system). I had a similar problem a few weeks ago, and was able to replace just the solenoid for less than $15 from a local sprinkler supply store. Here it is even cheaper from Amazon, if you can afford to wait. No special tools were required for the installation, ...


1

You are describing a 3-way switch, which is among the most cheap and common electrical elements you will find. You can pay up a bit for a 3-way switch with "pilot light" which will illuminate the switch when the circuit is closed (or open, depending on how wired), so that users will know whether toggling the switch will be turning the receptacle on or off. ...


0

The solenoid coil assembly of many sprinkler valves is replaceable. This allows repair to occur without having to remove/replace the plumbing part of the valve assembly. If you have a similar type spare valve unit you could also consider swapping the solenoid coil off of it to replace the one with the damaged wire. You could try repairing the broken wire ...


1

If your sauna heater is a 240 volt heater, you don't need the grounded (neutral) conductor. You can simply cap it off using a twist-on wire connector, or other approved means.


0

The schematic image you've attached is difficult to see, so I can't say for sure. Based on the wiring, I would say that the B terminal would work as C. Since I'm not there and can't test things, I have to make some assumptions. Based on the wiring, it looks like the one cable goes to the thermostat and another goes to the outdoor air conditioning unit. ...


4

No, the intelligent (budget-concious) solution in this case is to use the cat3 conductors and any of various schemes to run ethernet over them; starting with the base case that 10Mbit ethernet runs happily on Cat3 wire, and many Cat3 wires are actually fine for 100 Mbit. Those are "free" solutions. You could put trunking switches on either end and run a ...


1

From your question it sounds like you have a series of fixtures, some between the two switches and some past one of the switches. The key to a successful 3-way switch setup is maintaining the two traveler conductors between the two switches and then choosing one of the two switches as the "in" and the other as the "out". Usually the "close" switch (the ...


2

You'll need: NEMA 14-50 receptacle. 40 ampere double pole breaker Four 8 AWG copper conductors, or four 6 AWG aluminum conductors (Hot, Hot, Neutral, Ground). It's common for builders to use a 50 ampere breaker and larger conductors, to make sure the circuit can handle any range the owner's might use. But if you're installing the circuit to support a ...


1

The install guide for the oven lists a 40 amp circuit.


4

Based on the photograph, I'd say the black wires are feeding voltage from the panel (hot) and carrying the voltage onto another switch or outlet. The red wire is presumably going to the light (load). You need to connect the black wires to one screw of the new switch and the red to the other. Leave the green (ground) screw unconnected. It's generally not ...


3

It sounds like whoever installed it, used the neutral as a hot and the ground as a neutral. Likely they wanted to control the fan and light separately, but only had two conductor cable between the switch and fixture. If you're installing a remote, you'll only need the two conductors. Without seeing what you have, this is what you might have to do. ...


2

Whether it is safe depends mostly on how well the wires were protected and how much space is in the canopy. But it is not a good idea. Wires need to be protected from being disconnected and from being shorted out. Disconnecting could happen if there is too much strain on the mechanical connection through excess force. If wires are well connected with wire ...


0

There are remote modules you can purchase to control the light/fan separately. Most remote modules are wireless but there are some hardwired remote modules. I've used both but my preference is to spend the 15 dollars more and get the hardwired control. One that I've used and liked is this one from Lutron Maestro. It will use the single hot wire to ...


1

With another clockwise fan from the same maker, I was able to reverse the direction by interchanging the yellow and black wires as some answers here indicated. The explanation as I understood is that the rewiring changes the winding with which the capacitor is in series and hence the starting direction is inverted. In 3-phase motors, each of the three ...


1

I'm assuming the new switch came with the new light/fan unit. In that case, cap the red wire in both boxes. It must be a communicating switch. So wire it as you would any single-pole light switch and light.


2

Before National Electrical Code 2014, this was not allowed. However, if your area has adopted the 2014 version of the code, this is now legal as long as both circuits originate from the same panel (250.130(C)(4)). See this answer for more detail.


8

No, you cannot. Unless you're not covered by National Electrical Code (or similar), you don't care about following codes, or you're also installing a permanent barrier or listed divider. National Electrical Code Chapter 8 Communications Systems. Article 820 Community Antenna Television and Radio Distribution Systems. 820.133 Installation ...


3

Yes, the wire is undersized for 20 amps - 12 gauge copper is code minimum for 20 amps - if the run is long, 10 gauge can be a smart choice, if it's very long a larger size feed (30 - 60 amps at 240V) to a subpanel run on aluminum wire of much larger size quickly makes financial sense given the relative prices of aluminum and copper. The cycle in effect is ...


2

Position the rack so you can screw into the studs. If that is not practical then mount a sheet of decent thickness plywood onto the wall surface and fasten that to the studs wherever possible. The rack can then mount onto the plywood. If you use a plywood that is 3/4' inch (19 or 20mm) thick then the screws for the rack need not even penetrate the drywall at ...


0

I had some help from a friend and I think I have the mess worked out.


1

In almost every scenario the answer would be no. If the receptacles you are talking about are general use or serving the counter areas in the kitchen then the answer is definitely no.



Top 50 recent answers are included