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1

Not enough room in the comments. For $20 you can get a USB 3.0 to Gigabit ethernet adapter http://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-SuperSpeed-Gigabit-Ethernet/dp/B00BBD7NFU/ref=lp_13983791_1_6?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1427678239&sr=1-6 Faster USB than the Pi, less expensive than the Pi, no need for an external power supply as the Pi would need. Cat 6 ...


1

To get reliable USB over more than about 15 feet you'll have to use active extenders. I see a 31 foot active USB extension cable online for $15 right now. Good luck pulling the fat end through your walls, though. And it's only USB 2.0. What are you going to do when all your old in-wall USB cables are obsolete and none of your new devices want to work with ...


2

Sealed in this case is weatherproof, save your sanity and use something like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Taymac-1-Gang-Horizontal-or-Vertical-Mount-Weatherproof-While-in-Use-Cover-Kit-MKG410C/202284520?N=5yc1vZca29 But feel free to recess it into your house.


1

You have to assemble it first, before wires, but putting the string in as you put it together is fine. 300.18 Raceway Installations (A) Complete Runs. Raceways, other than busways or exposed raceways having hinged or removable covers, shall be installed complete between outlet, junction, or splicing points prior to the installation of conductors.


1

In Australia and New Zealand, outlets are what Americans call "back wired". The holes have room for two or more wires to be looped through. Wires must be twisted together. In wall power wires can be stranded or solid, but the earth must be stranded. UK sockets are on "ring main", so every socket is expected to have wires feeding into and out of it from ...


2

You can run type NM cable in conduit, as long as the conduit is sized appropriately, and is not in a wet or damp location. If you remove the sheath from the conductors inside NM cable, you cannot use the conductors for anything (anything electrical anyway). Type NM cable is rated, listed, and labeled as a cable assembly. The conductors inside are not ...


4

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


2

A simple on/off switch is best for a fan. This is a 'single-pole' switch. For a rocker style, something like this would work http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-Decora-15-Amp-Single-Pole-AC-Quiet-Switch-White-R72-05601-2WS/100058788 The switch will most likely be rated for 15 amps. This is fine, the switch must be the same as or more than the fan.


1

I'm assuming you also have a ground wire? You should use the orange wire as the interconnect, and cap the brown. You could even go as far as to use red electrical tape to wrap the orange wire near the marrette so it's properly labeled, but it's not necessary. Just make sure you're using the same wire throughout and it will be fine. However, do be advised ...


2

You'll have to purchase a timer that is specifically designed to work as a 3-way switch. Or you'll have to rewire the other 3-way switch in such a way that it will no longer control anything. Since I can't see the wiring at the second switch, I'm guessing the wiring currently looks something like this... Which is sketchy, since there's no grounded ...


1

60 ampere double pole breaker in the main panel. 6 AWG copper wire (x4) for a run less than 75ft., 4 AWG copper wire (x4) for runs less than 150ft. 60 ampere panel with 60 ampere main breaker.


0

Are you sure you want to run ethernet for your security camera's? an alternative is to run Coaxial cable with power. The cable is an integrated cable (one coaxial and one power) see RG59 Siamese cable Yes. this is not digital. But at least you have the increased reliability of Coax and reduced cost of the camera's. Remember your DVR can convert to ...


1

Based on what you've shown, you should be able to wire it up like this... However, those red Wing-NutĀ® twist-on wire connectors are only rated for a maximum of 6 #14 conductors. So you'll have to split up the neutrals in to two groups, and connect the groups with a pigtail between them.


1

You likely switched wires. It sounds like the thee wire pairs consist of: Power feed Line to kitchen light switch Line to basement light. From your description switch was being used to bridge the power feed to the kitchen light using push in connection and the screw connection. (This may not be to code.) It appears the power feed and basement light ...


1

After wrestling with 3way (i call them "two pole" but to each their own) switches I have learned that the only way out is patience and testing. Don't trust the wire colors. Unhook the switches from both sides (or just one switch if you are sure the other hasn't been altered since it was working), put wire nuts on the open wires, and power the circuit back ...


0

In short, you don't really want to do this. The motion sensor is a simple two-position switch, and it can't be easily used in a circuit with three-way switches. You would end up violating the code requirement that there be two points of control of the light, one at each landing of the staircase, each able to turn the light on or off independently of the ...


1

I'm guessing your wiring looks something like this. So if you also draw the grounded (neutral) conductors, it looks something like this. Drawing it like this you can clearly see, if you connect the grounded (neutral) conductors in box 5 (B5) to the grounded (neutral) in box 1 (B1), you'll have a giant loop. It shouldn't cause any problems, ...


1

What you will want to do in your case, instead of nutting all the neutrals together (which is technically a 310.10(H) violation!), is keep the neutral from the breaker at B1 and going to B2 and the existing light fixture separate from the neutrals coming in from B4 and going out to the two recessed-light circuits -- in other words, B1 and B5's neutrals are ...


0

All fed from one breaker... all neutrals together, all grounds together. That's how I was taught.


0

From the symptoms you described, it could be one of three things, as you had it wired correctly the first time around: Your GFCI switch/outlet needs to be reset (and perhaps toggled as well) in order to start functioning. You made a bad connection to the GFCI switch/outlet on the line side when you originally wired it. Your GFCI switch/outlet is somehow ...


2

First, you can only connect one wire to a screw. If you need to connect multiple, then you create a pigtail by cutting a short piece of wire and attaching one end to the screw, and the other end is connected to the other wires with a wire nut. Second, you need to figure out which cable provides the power to the box. Most likely it is the cable without the ...


0

How you wire it up, depends on whether or not you want to provide GFCI protection to the load. This answer will show you how to wire it up in either case.


0

The answer to question 2 is that you are right to not feel comfortable about doing that. Get a short bit of wire, twist one end of it together with the other 3 wires together, and put the open end under the screw. Known as a 'pigtail' among electricians.


4

You should be able to simply swap the switches. This is your current wiring (grounds have been removed to make it less confusing). There should be no problem with you swapping the switches like so...


1

Cheating your question a little bit But what about 2 deora switch in one of the 2 gang box google B000FKDMAU The light on the top and the fan on the bottom, seems reasonable And a GFI of your choice in the other space


0

As Reece notes, you may have to pull another wire but in fact they do make these. Combination Double Switch/GFCI Outlet: (Amazon)


0

Yes, stranded wire is okay; see Tester101's answer for more details. However, I'd like to add some advice: from experience, solid-wire is both easier and more reliable to pigtail, so if you have a choice, prefer the solid wire. Also, after seeing multiple correctly-sized and -screwed wirenuts gradually slide off of stranded wire, I now always wrap the wire ...


3

As long as all the equipment is listed for the use, there's no problem using stranded wire. The UL White Book says that screw terminals and pressure plate terminals can be used with both solid and stranded wire. UL White Book 2013 Receptacles(RTDV) Receptacles for Plugs and Attachment Plugs (RTRT) Terminals Terminals of the wire-binding ...


0

There is often a "fan" switch on the thermostat, which can be set either to "auto" or to "on" - the "on" setting runs the fan all the time, which can be helpful with distributing heat (or cold) in houses that otherwise tend to be very cold downstairs and very hot upstairs due to natural convection currents, especially if the furnace/AC does not run for quite ...


1

Light 1. Yes, you will pigtail and put the 3 neutral wires together in 1 wire nut. Light 2. Correct, it will not work. You will need to add the control at the junction box with the light or receptacle. Light 3. I would put a pigtail in with the black wires, and put under the top screw. Add the pigtail and put the 3 neutrals together. The red wire to the ...


0

The only fix to be NEC compliant is "REPLACE THE WIRE". You'll never have to worry about the repair when you're going to take a nap or go to bed. We've all heard the horror stories about "jury rigging" and "baling wire" electrical fixes. If you are physically unable to get under your house, ask a neighbor like me that is electrically proficient, to help you. ...


0

I found a suitable workaround. It is quite simple, but I wasn't aware of when I asked the original question because I didn't know how these things worked. The solution is just to buy one 3-way occupancy sensor and place it in the hallway and keep the staircase one (located in the living room) as is (i.e. regular manual switch). It will cover 80% of use ...


0

User315 is completely correct from a technical viewpoint. I will add, touching the generator, while standing on the ground, are a generator ground rod, no option. Being the path of least resistance, sucks.


1

The breakers should be specifically marked as to what wire types and sizes the terminals are compatible with; they also should be aluminum wiring compatible if the house is wired with aluminum wire. But it's always good to check. You may need to remove the breakers to read the markings on them. You should be aware (before you buy) that Tyco "COPALUM" is ...


0

I searched google for Hunter fan install and found a pdf manual. It may not be correct for you model. They should offer the proper one on their site. http://i60.tinypic.com/10pu9ky.png I do not think you use the red wire, marette it and forget it. The fan has green/ground black/fan hot black-white/ light hot white/ shared neutral The remote has ...


1

TL;DR: Whoever installed your ceiling fan had some terminal screws loose The good news is that the green wire is unmistakably tagged as an equipment grounding conductor, and was likely not the current return path in the original wiring configuration. The bad news is that whoever originally wired this did a hack job, deciding to use some blue wire they had ...


1

Yes, it's definitions possible that the black with white stripe is the same as blue. Though you might find that the black is blue, and the black with white stripe is black. In either case it won't matter, if you get it wrong you'll just have to switch them.


0

This will work as long as you can mount the box securely, and are not violating the box's listing. As Some Guy pointed out, the whole lot of EGCs (ground wires) only counts as 1 wire for box fill purposes. And yes, an extension ring on a stud-type (old work or new work) box can work as well, if you don't mind the resulting box sticking out from the wall.


0

There is no problem using the metal boxes, it is done all the time. All of the ground wires count as only 1 wire for box fill calculations I will Never be caught saying this it the best idea - 3 gang plastic 1.5" extender, UPC 018997489678 3 gang mud ring for the metal box ...


1

The problem with doing this is you may have, say, a 30 amp double pole breaker on your 240V line which may be 10g wire, and the you come off it on one phase with a 120V circuit with 14g wire, the 30 amp breaker is to high for 14g wire, which then is not protected from melting. The US has moved to 4 wire 240V service, to accommodate appliances that have ...


0

For American readers: I cannot find any language in the NEC expressly prohibiting the use of switches (motion-sensing or manual) in parallel for ORed lighting configurations such as the OPs. However, there's another problem, and that's user expectancy; even with manual switches installed, most people will see this setup and think "three-way switch", not ...


3

There are more choices than you might think http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/SectionDisplay.jsp?section=38557&minisite=10251 I am thinking you might want a 3-way, manual on, auto off. But whatever Pattern, Coverage, Time delay, or Switch type, you will likely find it here. You can get leviton stuff anywhere, it is likely one of these would be a special ...


-2

Ask him what part of the code he thought putting a 30 amp breaker would cause the violation. Ask for true curiosity, if no other reason than I want to know. :) Is there a plug on the saw, so you can plug it into an outlet on the wall ? If not, put a plug on the saw and an outlet on the wall. (I can see him calling foul on a hard wired 15 amp rated saw, ...


4

I don't know about "slow trip circuit breakers", but maybe I can help you understand trip curves (and circuit breakers) a bit better. Then you'll see that all circuit breakers are "slow trip". Your basic, everyday, run of the mill circuit breaker offers two types of protection. Short-circuit protection is provided using a magnetic trip function, while ...


2

On the schematic, the BL wire in the section labeled "Low Voltage Field Connection" near the bottom of the diagram. That's the C wire. Click for larger view It appears as though the "C" wire is bonded to the chassis, so you should be able to connect the C wire from the thermostat to the chassis as well. In the last photo, if you follow the yellow wire ...


0

At the risk of being a complete ass, you are likely putting way too much effort into a plan that is not likely to work. You start with, "My tenants never turn the lights off ... ." This is not an issue of electrical wiring, this is about the tenants behavior. In trying to help, my question to you is, why do you think your tenants are not going to just ...


0

Yes, you can, under code, but you will also need to have 'real' switches also installed. As far as the second part write on a bit of paper, in marker, and stuff it in the the motion sensor junction box. Will both of the sensors cover the entire stairway? This is the game changer.


0

I have a homebrew chest freezer in the garage, and a very understanding wife. I am going to guess the problem is that the fridge has a 'freon' leak. This leads to lack of oil in the freon line to lubricate the compressor. Which causes the compressor to overheat, and then a high temp thermostat opens. The unit cools down, the thermostat resets, and it ...


0

With 12-4 wire, and particularly with both breakers on the same buss, the neutrals should be separated all the way to the panel. Given 12-4 wire, the neutrals should be separated regardless.


0

Note that wifi may be a perfectly reasonable alternative to the cat5. A standard router covers my property quite adequately. If i needed longer throw, a directional antenna can increase range considerably; websearching "cantenna" will find a number of designs. (I've used the side-fired coffee can design;not the most efficient but easy to build and it does ...



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