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17

I'm sorry, but from the tone of your question, and the fact that you even suggest plugging this motor into a regular 15A receptacle tells me you are so far over your head your only valid option is to hire a pro to wire this. This is NOT a simple DIY job and you cannot simply ask questions to get every little detail out of an internet message board to do this ...


5

Breaking the tab on the neutral side does exactly the same as the hot side: it separates one terminal and neutral outlet from the other terminal and outlet. I can't imagine a scenario where only the neutral would be cut. The neutral should be cut where the corresponding hots are cut and come with their own neutral. For example, if the two halves of the ...


5

There are collar boxes available that have conduit KO's (knockouts). Just install one on top of the existing device box and run your conduit. This one is even better as it has more volume: Brand: Steel City, Part number:531511234UB Here is a raised device cover to be used with the 4x4 box shown. They can be had in any number of different ...


4

It might be important to add a photo of a plug, so us Yanks can understand what you're talking about. Based on the image it's clear to see that the terminal screws have no heads, so it's much different from most screw terminals a US user would come across. Terminals like this; even in the US, are designed to clamp a straight bit of wire. With a terminal ...


4

A Gas lawnmower with an electric start. Electric ones don't like to cut heavy dense grass. Plug it in at the house, start it, disconnect and go. A quick search found a self-propelled one for about $300. I couldn't really find one much cheaper but I do recommend a self propelled model. Like this one from Briggs and Stratton, a reputable company. -Home ...


4

The general guidelines: Don't notch a joist. (it's legal under the correct circumstances, but don't consider it until you have no other choice.) Don't drill a joist near the ends. (how near is near? Stick to the middle third and be safe. ) Only drill on the center-line of the joist. (This is the area under least stress). keep your holes less than 1/3 ...


4

You follow the directions on the new ballast. Exclusively, and in detail. Most (but not all) modern ballasts ignore bi-pin tubes with heaters, so you (following the diagram) connect to both pins (at one end of the tube) with one color wire. But if the diagram shows otherwise, you follow it. In any case, you follow, exactly, the diagram on the new ballast. ...


4

I assume you are in the USA. The heater is probably a pure 240V load with no need for the neutral (white) wire. you should simply cap the white wire with a wire nut and tuck it back into the electrical box.


4

My understanding is that I need a 1 phase(household) to three phase converter to do this. Yes. Usually these are used if you need to control the speed, torque, or another aspect of the motor. If you just need a constant 1750 RPM with a max 1HP, then you can purchase a single phase AC motor that doesn't require a converter. If you need to control the ...


4

Improper Electrical Wiring constitutes a serious life safety hazard. It can be the source of structural fire and potentially fatal shocks. I am not saying that you can't splice a common electrical wall switch into an extension cord. I am saying that it is not a good general practice. Consider Instead Installing a suitable hardwired outlet and wall ...


3

18g stranded wire is quite common on arms 14g stranded is often used to join the 18g arm strands, and to tie into the ceiling. This applies to North America and normal chandeliers with relatively low (<50 each) wattage bulbs.


3

If this receptacle you are referring to is serving the kitchen counter you CANNOT use that to feed a disposal. Kitchen counter circuits cannot be used to feed fixed appliances. You will need to run a new feed to the disposal, preferably a dedicated circuit from the panel.


2

Well, the way I'd find it would be to get a wire tracer. These consist of a transmitter that hooks to one end of the wire to use it as an antenna, and a short-range (and sometimes directional) receiver which you can then use to find the wire emitting that signal. That will let you trace a wire through the wall's surface. (There are several variants of this, ...


2

I recommend that you not use the back stab wire technique. There are numerous problems with these things - both long term and short term. More often that one would like these connections lead to intermittent connections. I would remove all the wires from the sides and back stab holes of the old outlet. Connect the two existing hot wires with your third ...


2

You can do it using only 12/2 and 12/3 cables like this. Or you could use 12/2 and 12/4 cables like this. Because there will be so many wires in the box, you'll want to get at least a 34 cu. in. double gang box. Like this one. NOTES: I've excluded grounding conductors from the images to increase clarity. Do not forget to connect all grounding ...


2

Grounding the mast is a very good idea if it is metal. You can get ground clamps that are designed for use with water pipes and conduit of practically any diameter. They are two curved pieces of metal that have machine screws on either side to clamp to the pipe. There is also a screw terminal for your ground wire. I would put a separate ground rod in, but ...


2

Your method is fine. If your area has adopted the 2011 version of the National Electrical Code, this method allows you to wire the circuit using 2 wire cable instead of 3 wire cable. A change to the code now requires a grounded "neutral" conductor at all switch locations that control lighting loads. National Electrical Code 2011 Chapter 4 ...


2

It looks a bit of an unusual setup, but I'll hazard a guess that there is either a further light on the circuit either fed from one of the switches or the power from the circuit is fed in at a switch and feeds on from here to another light (or lights). (Obviously, you need to verify this, as we can't tell how it's wired from just one photograph). From left ...


1

Don't do it! If the devices are on separate circuits, you cannot "tie" them together. If you're in the USA and use single phase service, you've likely turned a 120 Volt circuit into a 240 Volt short-circuit. You've directly connected the two legs of the service, causing a short-circuit. The switch is intended to control three branches of a single ...


1

OK, first of all, plainly this is a mess. The fact that there is a white wire hooked up to a black wire without any recolouring of it alone says that (1) there's some amateurish stuff going on here, and (2) you cannot trust any of the white wires to actually be neutral until you prove that they are. So proceed cautiously, and take notes as you go. There ...


1

Both black and red are typically used to indicate hot. Though you can't be positive without actually testing it with a multimeter. Red is usually used when there are two hots (14/3 wire instead of 14/2). Both green and bare copper are used to indicate ground. So it sounds like you wired it correctly. The green wire from the line (source) should also be ...


1

Yes, you can use this. GFCI breakers combine two different functions into one device. The circuit breaker function of the device is rated for 50 amps. However, because your 15 amp breaker is upstream from the GFCI, your circuit is protected at 15 amps, and will trip at 15 amps if there is a fault either before or after your GFCI. The GFCI function on the ...


1

Any thoughts? Plainly something is messed up. I have many times taken apart a switch and discovered that the previous homeowner was creative in their choices. A recent one: white was hot and black was neutral, ground was open, the switch was wired to interrupt the neutral, the white wire from the lamp was connected to the black wire from the wall, and ...


1

There is no problem connecting wires to both the "back stab", and screw terminals of a receptacle. As long as the terminals are rated for the size of wire being attached. For example. Most "back stab" terminals are rated for 14 AWG solid copper wire, whereas screw terminals are usually 12 or 14 AWG solid or stranded copper. With that said... It sounds ...


1

I don't know too much about replacing outlets, only what I've read online or through YouTube videos. That's a good start but I would strongly recommend that you learn more before you make potentially safety-impacting changes in your electrical wiring. In particular if you cannot immediately state the relationships between amps, volts and watts, if they ...


1

If you're in the US, NEC likely applies. Article 402 covers fixture wires, and explains what types and sizes are allowed. Type Table 402.3 lists the types of wires allowed to be used as fixture wires. If you're going to rewire the fixture, you'll have to use a type of wire listed in this table. FFH-2 HF, HFF KF-1, KF-2, KFF-1, KFF-2 PAF, PAFF PF, PFF ...


1

I really think you're going to be unhappy with an electric mower for this situation, for a couple reasons: 250 feet of extension cord is going to be expensive, heavy, and very unwieldy to mow with Electric mowers are not that powerful and mowing a full acre is going to be a long, hard slog. I would guess it would probably take you two hours of hard work. ...


1

From the comments posted above I understand.... You say that you measure a hot to neutral short at the electrical box for one particular circuit. On the other hand you say that no short is measured across hot to neutral at the outlet boxes. This can mean one of two things. (One) Something severed one or both of the wires between the outlet string and ...


1

You will not be able to get a "wire powered" thermostat, without at least one more wire. You'll need an additional wire, to connect to the C terminal of the new thermostat.


1

Yes wiring into your lighting is absolutely fine and would be a more complete solution as opposed to plugging the transformer into your wall socket. One thing with these 30A 12V transformers is that they are usually open terminal so I would advise you to get an enclosure if you do not already have one.



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