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6

Not even remotely close. You need 8 gauge copper or 6 gauge aluminum wire. A 20 amp dual pole breaker supplies 20 amps at 240 volts (line to line), or 20 amps at 120 volts twice (line to neutral and line to neutral). You need a 40 amp at 240 volt breaker. ...and these two questions in combination strongly suggest that you get professional help before you ...


6

Trenches are hard/expensive. Conduit is inexpensive. Having dug the hard and/or expensive trench, investing a tiny bit into having conduit in the trench so you never have to dig that trench again is just sense. Direct burial is silly. It's especially silly the second time, when conduit the first time would mean no need to dig again. It's a short-term ...


6

It's good that you found this, in the worst case, this situation can lead to an electrical fire. Check Connections First thing to do is turn off the power, and check all the mechanical connections at the switch. If this is aluminum wiring please comment and I'll update the post, as there are other considerations if so. Are there wires doubled up on a ...


6

Yes, all conductors protected by a 20 ampere circuit breaker must be at least 12 AWG copper. There are a few exceptions and loop holes, but none of them apply to your situation. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 240 Overcurrent Protection 240.4 Protection of Conductors. Conductors, other than flexible ...


6

Both the black and red are likely ungrounded (hot) conductors. However, one or both of them are likely switched. That is, one or both of them are energized only when a switch is closed. Test the wires with your meter, and determine which one is controlled by the switch. Once you figure that out, connect only that wire to the black wire on the fixture. ...


6

Since it's a plug attached device, is not covered by code. However, you should still be concerned with safety while making the repair. The safest bet here, would be to completely replace the cord. This means locating where the existing cord connects to the couch, removing the old cord, and replacing it with a new one. You'll also want to find a cord that ...


5

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


4

Can you elaborate on what you mean by "reverse wired?" If you're saying you want to put the switch at the far end, near the last light,the most straightforward way to do that is to pull power into that switch box, then feed the lights from there (don't feed the lights directly from the panel). Or, I suppose you could pull 3-rope all the way through from ...


4

Is the tab broken on the hot side? Garbage dispisal, so probably a kitchen. If the breaker double-wide? If so, you probably have a multi-wire branch circuit - so if you join the two hots you may find that the breaker trips hard as soon as you turn it on. If you have a voltmeter, check the voltage between the two hot wires - it should either be 0 volts ...


4

I don't know about "slow trip circuit breakers", but maybe I can help you understand trip curves (and circuit breakers) a bit better. Then you'll see that all circuit breakers are "slow trip". Your basic, everyday, run of the mill circuit breaker offers two types of protection. Short-circuit protection is provided using a magnetic trip function, while ...


4

You should be able to simply swap the switches. This is your current wiring (grounds have been removed to make it less confusing). There should be no problem with you swapping the switches like so...


3

A 3-way switch connects the common (hot) alternately to each of two travelers as it is switched. You can connect one of the wires from the old switch to the common terminal on the 3-way, and the other to one of the traveler terminals, leaving the other traveler terminal unconnected. There should be a marking on the side or back of the 3-way indicating which ...


3

There are more choices than you might think http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/SectionDisplay.jsp?section=38557&minisite=10251 I am thinking you might want a 3-way, manual on, auto off. But whatever Pattern, Coverage, Time delay, or Switch type, you will likely find it here. You can get leviton stuff anywhere, it is likely one of these would be a special ...


3

As long as all the equipment is listed for the use, there's no problem using stranded wire. The UL White Book says that screw terminals and pressure plate terminals can be used with both solid and stranded wire. UL White Book 2013 Receptacles(RTDV) Receptacles for Plugs and Attachment Plugs (RTRT) Terminals Terminals of the wire-binding ...


3

To get reliable USB over more than about 15 feet you'll have to use active extenders. I see a 31 foot active USB extension cable online for $15 right now. Good luck pulling the fat end through your walls, though. And it's only USB 2.0. What are you going to do when all your old in-wall USB cables are obsolete and none of your new devices want to work with ...


2

On the schematic, the BL wire in the section labeled "Low Voltage Field Connection" near the bottom of the diagram. That's the C wire. Click for larger view It appears as though the "C" wire is bonded to the chassis, so you should be able to connect the C wire from the thermostat to the chassis as well. In the last photo, if you follow the yellow wire ...


2

Conduit is the only way to go. Do it once and do it right. In 5 years you will be happy you did. PVC Conduit, you will need two runs, one AC and one data. You will never regret buying bigger pipe. They can lie next to each other. Rent a 'Ditch Witch' trencher for a day longer than you think you need, one that will dig 24", but an 18" trench will be fine. ...


2

In a main service panel; where the grounded (neutral) is bonded, you can land the grounded (neutral) conductor at either bus bar. In a panel where the grounded (neutral) and grounding bus bars are separate, you can only land a grounded (neutral) conductor on the grounded (neutral) bus bar. In this case, you'll either have to install a grounded (neutral) ...


2

First, you can only connect one wire to a screw. If you need to connect multiple, then you create a pigtail by cutting a short piece of wire and attaching one end to the screw, and the other end is connected to the other wires with a wire nut. Second, you need to figure out which cable provides the power to the box. Most likely it is the cable without the ...


2

You'll have to purchase a timer that is specifically designed to work as a 3-way switch. Or you'll have to rewire the other 3-way switch in such a way that it will no longer control anything. Since I can't see the wiring at the second switch, I'm guessing the wiring currently looks something like this... Which is sketchy, since there's no grounded ...


2

A simple on/off switch is best for a fan. This is a 'single-pole' switch. For a rocker style, something like this would work http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-Decora-15-Amp-Single-Pole-AC-Quiet-Switch-White-R72-05601-2WS/100058788 The switch will most likely be rated for 15 amps. This is fine, the switch must be the same as or more than the fan.


2

You can run type NM cable in conduit, as long as the conduit is sized appropriately, and is not in a wet or damp location. If you remove the sheath from the conductors inside NM cable, you cannot use the conductors for anything (anything electrical anyway). Type NM cable is rated, listed, and labeled as a cable assembly. The conductors inside are not ...


2

Sealed in this case is weatherproof, save your sanity and use something like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Taymac-1-Gang-Horizontal-or-Vertical-Mount-Weatherproof-While-in-Use-Cover-Kit-MKG410C/202284520?N=5yc1vZca29 But feel free to recess it into your house.


1

Yes, it's definitions possible that the black with white stripe is the same as blue. Though you might find that the black is blue, and the black with white stripe is black. In either case it won't matter, if you get it wrong you'll just have to switch them.


1

The problem with doing this is you may have, say, a 30 amp double pole breaker on your 240V line which may be 10g wire, and the you come off it on one phase with a 120V circuit with 14g wire, the 30 amp breaker is to high for 14g wire, which then is not protected from melting. The US has moved to 4 wire 240V service, to accommodate appliances that have ...


1

If I read your question correctly, you want to both have 120V and 240V outlets coming off of the same tandem breaker. The code compliant way to do this is to add a sub-panel at the end of the 240V feed and then have separate breakers feeding the 240V and 120V outlets. I believe it is against code to have both voltages of outlets directly fed by the same ...


1

Many CFLs take time to warm up, covered ones are worse than the naked spirals. See http://www.litetronics.com/lighting-technology/why-do-covered-cfls-have-a-long-warm-up-time.html


1

You have the right idea, but some of your terminology is wrong. In general, ALL household electrical work involves connecting the various lights, heaters, motors, computers, etc. all together with black to black, white to white, ground to ground. This kind of a connection is called PARALLEL (not series). To be specific, each of your lights will have a ...


1

Conduit is not required where a cable runs through bored holes in joists. If you're worried about it, you could install running boards between the joists above or below the cable. National Electrical Code Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials Article 334 Nonmetallic Sheathed Cable: Types NM, NMC, and NMS 334.17 Through or Parallel to ...


1

You could use cable stackers I think:



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