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8

No, and if this represents your level of electrical savvy, hire an electrician BEFORE you burn down your old house, old barn etc. When you say "the two 120V wires coming from the fuse box" I'm going to have to assume that you know nothing about how the US electrical system works, and have not bothered to educate yourself on it before deciding that running a ...


7

3M Scotchlok's would work for this application. They too would require a trip to a store, but the nice part is you don't need to strip the wire as they are self-piercing. They can connect two or three wires, and are filled with a sealant to provide moisture resistance. They are typically used for Telco wiring, but support wire gauge from 26-19AWG.


6

Your two choices if you want normal AC power out there are: Direct burial cable. Figure something like $0.50/foot for 12 gauge cable, though it's possible that you will need to buy a roll of 500' instead of just 300' since 250' or 500' are standard lengths. If you do this, you will need to make sure that it is buried 24", and I highly recommend putting a ...


5

Motors often have a surge load at startup which is much higher than their running load. If they've gone to the trouble of specifying this, I highly recommend taking their word for it.


4

Yes, since #10 wire can handle more amperage than #12, #10 wire would be a suitable substitute for #12. However, since #10 is larger and less flexible than #12, you may have a wiring device or junction box space issue.


4

And here is why you check it before hand, even though you have turned off that room. People get into Junction boxes and re-wire - joining two separate circuits into one - in that case one circuit in the house can be fed from two breakers (as long as they are on the same phase). Always check with testor - and NOT JUST a proximity induction testor - but an ...


4

I think @bib's suggestion of a crimp connector is the best way to go. If it was a 120V line outside, you should use a heat shrink crimp connector, but for low voltage this is optional (but still a good idea to prevent corrosion). The only other alternative I can think of that I'd consider is soldering the wires together, and sealing the connection in a ...


3

Consider crimp connectors While these are best used with a crimping tool, they can be set using a conventional or needlenose plier. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


3

If you use a spacer the inset must be equal to or less than 1/4 of an inch to be NEC compliant. See this question for relevant information: How do I extend outlets after installing a backsplash? Personally, I would just get a box extender like the one in the answer to the question above. They are fairly cheap and better by design (in my opinion).


2

The water pressure/flow analogy is, unfortunately, a common but very imperfect one. If we insist on using it, voltage is something like pressure and current is something like flow rate. The key concept you're missing is that you need a circuit, not a single wire. Voltage, like pressure in the pipe, is always measured relative to some reference point. If ...


2

Check to see what is in the ceiling fan box. Sounds like when the ceiling fan got ripped out, it ripped out the wire nuts that connected it. If this was the first light on the circuit, then there were probably 3 wires in each wire nut -- source, lamp, and next light on circuit. If you disconnected the source->next wires, it would explain your problem.


2

The switched circuit, and the USB outlet, hook up in parallel. REVISED DIAGRAM, after figuring out that the mention of three-way switch was a red herring: FROM POWER SOURCE: SWITCH TO CONTROLLED LOAD HOT __________________./ .__________________________________ Switched Hot | | ...


2

The wire that "loops" between the two switches is the hot wire from the power source. This is the same as having a single wire with 2 pig tails that connect to each switch. Since you're replacing two single-pole single-throw (SPST) switches with two of the same types, all you need to do is replace them with the exact same wiring that currently exists. ...


2

Get a meter. Set it to measure Volts, AC, in the 250 v range. Stick one probe into the short side of the upper outlet, and the other in the short side of the lower outlet. If it reads ~240 volts, then this is a split outlet, that is both outlets are on separate breakers, and the neutral is shared. This is old code, and was done so you can plug in both ...


2

Basically you need three 14/3 cables between the two boxes. Wire each pair as a set of 3-way switches. Here is a basic diagram. Just do this for each set of 3-ways. The only difference is that you will need to pigtail three leads onto the incoming feed wire to feed each switch in the first box, and splice all the white wires together since they are all ...


1

Have you verified that the hot is actually hot? Not to insult, but verify that the hot and neutral are identified and connected correctly. Use meter to go from hot to ground and verify voltage and neutral to ground to verify no voltage.


1

You want to break the connecting tabs off the receptacle (bend back and forth with needle nose pliers until metal fatigue causes them to break off), then just wire one plug to always be hot, and feed the other one through a switch:


1

One option is to use a single gang mud ring for double gang box. you can get metal or plastic ones.


1

The numbers are almost certainly a courtesy from the previous electrician -- odds are that the other end of each wire carries the same number, so if you have all the electrical boxes open you can confirm how things are connected without having to trace everything electrically. They may also correspond to that original electrician's notes on how this was ...


1

As long as the wire is sound and is joined old and new properly, i.e., not just twisted together but secured with a twist lock or crimp connector it meets code and is fine. Consider that the hot and neutral is already joined there so the ground connection does not degrade that circuit and is quite proper. That said - anytime you can replace old wiring with ...


1

You say "that room". Circuits are not nearly always designated to one room or area. Many, many times a room will have some devices on one circuit while others on another circuit. It is pretty rare that rooms are strictly wired so that one circuit distinctly feeds one room. Also, panel directories are not always extremely accurate. So something that says the ...


1

Yes. Once you shut off the room fuse, no electricity will be going to that room. However it is important to test all connections before working on them so you are positive that they are not powered.


1

What you have is NOT legal and really should be corrected. You CANNOT have general use lighting and receptacles on 30A circuits, even with #10 wire. You also do need a means of disconnect at a detached structure. You can use this feed to power a 30A-120/240V sub-panel using a tied two-pole 30A breaker in the main panel. This is only true if there are two ...


1

SWM splitters aren't really splitters, they're active (powered) switches. The power is applied to the cable on the input side. Here's a page on how they work: http://www.spectrumspot.com/solutions/swm-kit.html No harm to try, but I doubt it will work for you. Passive splitters are fine if the runs from the splitter to the TV are short, and they're ...


1

This is assumes we're talking a screw in bulb socket like a medium base A26. You can adapt the below for other socket types. The first thing to do is test the socket itself. Best way to do this is to use a multi-meter set to AC and an appropriate voltage setting for your supply voltage. Using the test leads, touch the bottom pin and the metal of the base ...


1

I have used a plastic spacer from a Mechano set on the screws that holds the receptacle in the work box. That one was about 1/4 inch by 1/4 round. They look like this although the one in the picture is not the same size.


1

Is it safe to pigtail from 10 gauge down to 12 gauge? Yes, as long as you are not exceeding the power limits of the 12 gauge wiring or the receptacles. For those who may need a simple example, we do this all of the time - The house itself receives power from 0 gauge wire into the distribution box, and from there we put in an appropriate sized breaker, and ...


1

It wont hurt a thing, but it's a pain. (To run) Return it for smaller, and have some $ left over for fixtures. If you cant return it, I would use it on outlets/receptacles not lights. Use for longest runs first.



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