Hot answers tagged

10

It's not connected to anything. There is non-zero capacitance between the lines in the cable, and your meter has a high input impedance. Capacitive coupling gives you a phantom voltage that will disappear as soon as anything is connected. Connect the ground and neutral correctly and the non-problem will go away. Then there's the question of WHY you were ...


9

You don't need a bulb at all to test the fixture. There should be one main "neutral", and one main "hot" wire coming out of the fixture. If there's more than one of each, you can tie each set all together, or test each one individually. The following procedure assumes a single "hot", and single "neutral". First, set the multimeter to test continuity , or ...


7

To my understanding, no. 250.119 Identification of Equipment Grounding Conductors. Unless required elsewhere in this Code, equipment grounding conductors shall be permitted to be bare, covered, or insulated. Individually covered or insulated equipment grounding conductors shall have a continuous outer finish that is either green or green with one ...


5

Everything downstream of the GFCI has to be connected to both the Hot and Neutral from the Load side of the GFCI. The way you've wired it, when the heater kicks on, current is flowing from the Load side of the GFCI through the heater and back to the panel without returning through the GFCI's neutral connection, so the GFCI sees an imbalance and trips. I ...


4

According to Table 250.122 of the National Electrical Code, a 10 AWG copper conductor is fine as an equipment grounding conductor for circuits with up to 60 ampere protection. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 250 Grounding and Bonding 250.122 Size of Equipment Grounding Conductors. (A) General. ...


4

You should definitely pull a new cable for the washing machine circuit. Problems with your solution You can't use a red wire as a neutral (See NEC 200.6(A)). Circuit conductors (wires) must be contained in the same "raceway, auxiliary gutter, cable tray, cablebus assembly, trench, cable, or cord" (See NEC 300.3(B)). You have not clearly described where ...


4

The water apparently got inside the stove and caused a short. If there was a fuse inside there that blew, the breaker wouldn't have tripped. The breaker is detecting the excessive current to the appliance and switching off the power before the wiring inside the wall overheats and start a fire. The best solution, as the electrician indicated, is to have the ...


3

For whomever does this again: I've found it easier to fish monofilament pull line: Tie a large loop it in, tape it to your fishing pole, and retreive it the attic with stick with a hook on it (breaking the tape). Now tie your wire to the other end of the fishing line and pull.


3

There are instance where this is possible and legal, such as bathroom vanity bar type lights with an integral and complete back plate. Other than that a box is absolutely mandatory. Here is a good example. Imagine these fixtures flush against the wall.


3

If you were to attach something similar to the end of the wire such as a hex nut that would not easily slip off then you could make up a remote noose on the end of a long stick that looks like this. (proverbial back of envelope sketch) Aim the stick down into the tight corner of the attic and lower the noose over the end of the wire with the hex nut. ...


3

I take it these are powered speakers plugged into the computer? They usually have very cheap, poorly-shielded little amplifiers in them which are good at demodulating radio and playing it out the speaker. A mobile phone call nearby will typically also cause a bunch of beeping and "dirtdirtdirt" noises. If your computer has a three-pin plug but is plugged ...


3

Am I allowed to add new sockets onto lighting circuit nowadays? Yes. Do I need to worry about lighting per square foot? Other than for your own personal preference since it's your own home, not really. Overloading the lights - well I only use LED lights, but someone in the future might stick something else in, right? What do I tell the ...


3

The following assumes that only one switch controls the outlets. Turn the breaker off to the outlets. Confirm there is no power with an outlet tester. Remove the switch cover. Loosen the switch. Confirm there is no power to the switch using a no-contact tester. Remove the two wires attached to the switch (should be a combination of black, red or white). ...


3

You got it. Just make sure to separate the neutral and the ground on the dryer and use a 4-wire dryer whip and receptacle. Sounds like a plan. Good luck!


3

Your voltage drop is less than 4V so that is good. With 4 90's it would be legal to do it without junction boxes(360 max - then boxes are required). Soap the wire when pulling it will go much easier. We used to use Dawn dish soap but they also make "pull soap" that wont dry out and get sticky like Dawn.


3

Apart from what code requires, there are various things that you might choose to do, depending on your mindset, that are not code required (nor do they conflict with code.) For instance, I prefer to keep all lighting circuits completely separate from any outlet circuits, having basically never had light fixtures blow a fuse/trip a breaker, but having ...


2

According to the National Electrical Code. You can only run communications circuits in conduit with electric power conductors, if they are separated by a permanent and listed barrier (800.133(A)(1)(d)Ex.1, 830.133(A)(1)(f)Ex.1). With some communications circuits, you can run them in the same conduit if all the conductors are capable of handling the maximum ...


2

Some areas code do not allow data in the same conduit with power unless the data cable has the voltage rating of the power in that run. If you do run shielded, ground on the supply end do not ground on both ends this is how industrial plants run comm wires when in close proximity to 480V lines.


2

If you're getting power on the LINE side but not the LOAD side of the GFCI, there's a few possibilities. The GFCI is not set. Make sure the reset button is pushed in all the way. The device is not wired probably. GFCIs typically will not set if they are wired incorrectly. The device is defective. Exchange it, or buy a new one. There's a ...


2

There's a few options. No grounding conductor If there's no grounding conductor at all, there's a few things you can do. Install a grounding conductor Obviously, you could install a grounding conductor for the circuit. Share a grounding conductor Code allows you to share a grounding conductor from another circuit, as long as the grounding conductor is ...


2

Short answer: This is a violation of the National Electrical Code. Long answer: The Code has always required the grounding of metallic parts that may become energized. Your circuit to the pump house should contain an equipment grounding conductor. Residential systems have a voltage level that qualify under the systems that must be grounded in Article ...


2

If the switches are basic (not 3-way and not having some special feature needing a neutral), you are correct. The simplest way to remove the switch and leave the outlets always live is to twist the two wires (other than the bare or green ground wire) from the switch together and cover with a wire nut. These will most likely be both black, black and red, or ...


2

What I ended up doing was ditching the fishing rod all together and taping a long piece of magnet to the end of the wire I was running with electrical tape. And on the other side, using a 6 foot long stick and taping about 3 magnets together with electrical tape at the end and I was able to attach the 2 magnets together. This allowed me to draw the wire ...


2

If it is for incandescent lamps there is little that can go wrong with it but if you screw a good lamp into each socket and use your multimeter in continuity or ohms you should be able to test each socket individually. The resistance of a 40 watt 120 volt lamp is about 360 ohms. Without any lamps screwed in you should get ~infinite resistance or no ...


2

Are they on a dimmer? I run an electrical wholesale company and this comes up all the time. It's not the wiring it's the dimmer switch. Find out the brand led bulb (or led trim) and see witch dimmer is compatible with that brand. Then buy that dimmer and install it. All done!! :) Ps it's probably a lutron AY-153P-wh


2

Much obliged to those who gave answers and comments. They were all very useful. I ended up getting the manlift to work just fine by recharging its battery (there was only 1, it turns out) as if it were a car battery. It ended up working just fine. Thanks again for all your suggestions.


2

The code doesn't allow 240v circuits to have 120v loads on them. For instance putting a receptacle on a water heater or Air Conditioning circuit is not allowed. The heater needs to be moved to a separate two pole breaker sized at 125% of the heater load. A GFCI is not require for a space heater.


2

I'd first check if someone incorrectly wired a single half switched receptacle. To do this, you're going to need to check the outlets for a hot and then determine how the circuit is run through the walls for the switch. Turn off the switch and check outlets to see if there's still a hot connection anywhere. I'd try with a non-contact tester first, and if ...


2

If the wall switch only has 2 wires, it is called a switch loop. The closet light and switch cannot be extended from the current switch. The closet switch and light need a neutral, and that seems to end at the lighting fixture. If you can run a two wire cable from the fixture to the closet switch and then to the closet fixture, the setup is simple: Connect ...


2

There are too many unknowns here for us to help you out. We don't know which switches you intend to use afterwards (locations), what access you have to joining the circuits together, or what the possibilities of joining them would be without knowing of your personal setup. Your setup, roughly as described to us is... <--- S --- S --- Kitchen Lights ...



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