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8

No, that box can absolutely NOT be fixed. There are parts that are physically broken that are not replaceable, aside from that fact that it is generally in poor shape. Plus, I see evidence that that right-hand line side screw has overheated. Even if it could, as Aloysius said, it is really not worth it. Someone, probably a home inspector, will see it and ...


6

Unless you're in a real estate market so hot that people are doing drive-by-buying, just spend a few bucks to get a replacement panel. They're not expensive; labor won't be excessive, and then it won't be an impediment to sale. Even if the existing one was fixed, your potential buyer will be calculating money off to replace it.


6

DO NOT DO IT!!!! Chimney vents must not be compromised! All heat and gas related stacks must be left intact. No additional venting or other holes may be put in them. As the comments have noted, you run the serious risk of carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as the risk of chimney and house fires. Find another route well away from the chimney.


6

Since it's a plug attached device, is not covered by code. However, you should still be concerned with safety while making the repair. The safest bet here, would be to completely replace the cord. This means locating where the existing cord connects to the couch, removing the old cord, and replacing it with a new one. You'll also want to find a cord that ...


6

Both the black and red are likely ungrounded (hot) conductors. However, one or both of them are likely switched. That is, one or both of them are energized only when a switch is closed. Test the wires with your meter, and determine which one is controlled by the switch. Once you figure that out, connect only that wire to the black wire on the fixture. ...


6

Yes, all conductors protected by a 20 ampere circuit breaker must be at least 12 AWG copper. There are a few exceptions and loop holes, but none of them apply to your situation. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 240 Overcurrent Protection 240.4 Protection of Conductors. Conductors, other than flexible ...


4

Lubrication is generally only useful when pulling through conduit. If you are pulling through open walls, usually the issues are obstructions, bends, small holes between framing members, etc. All cables will stretch slightly when you pull them, the goal is to not pull so hard as to wreck the cable. Different cable types tolerate this better than others. ...


4

When someone says soap you have to take in consideration their experience. They may very well mean soap, as it is slippery and would probably work. If, however, they're from the electrical/low voltage field they more likely mean Yellow-77 - or a similar variation available today. A gel-ish type is what you'll likely find at a big-box store. Personally, I ...


4

A wire from the receptacle to the box is still no ground at all - the box isnt grounded. You need to either replace the wire all the way back to the electrical panel to make a properly grounded outlet, or replace the outlet with a GFCI, which provides the protection a ground wire would. You are also supposed to label the outlet with a "No Equipment Ground" ...


4

The tip I got from an electrician was to just buy the big boxes; the cost difference is minor, it's easier to work in bigger boxes, and then you don't have to work about it.


4

Can you elaborate on what you mean by "reverse wired?" If you're saying you want to put the switch at the far end, near the last light,the most straightforward way to do that is to pull power into that switch box, then feed the lights from there (don't feed the lights directly from the panel). Or, I suppose you could pull 3-rope all the way through from ...


4

Typically you'd run 14/2 to the vanity, and 14/3 to the fan/light combo. In the switch box, Connect all the grounded (neutral) conductors. Connect all the grounding conductors. Connect the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the vanity to the switch. Connect one of the ungrounded (hot) conductors from the light/fan to the switch. Connect the other ...


4

It's good that you found this, in the worst case, this situation can lead to an electrical fire. Check Connections First thing to do is turn off the power, and check all the mechanical connections at the switch. If this is aluminum wiring please comment and I'll update the post, as there are other considerations if so. Are there wires doubled up on a ...


3

I would recommend cleaning the knockouts first. Sand them completely free of any paint or rust. Then scrape clean the circular groove of the knockout on both sides using a sharp pointed tool like an awl. After doing this, the knockout should come out with a sharp block from a ball peen hammer and screwdriver. If this does not work, the next step would be ...


3

12Ga wire is rated for 20 amps, so derating for continuous load nets you 16 amps, [16Amps times 125% = 20 amps] and 14.4 amps is less than 16 amps, so one 12Ga wire should be adequate for two heaters. Whether the thermostat is rated for that load will depend on the thermostat, but from a wiring point of view 12Ga wire is adequate. Pending your response to ...


3

Every 14 ga. wire entering (or exiting) the box needs 2 cubic inches. Every 12 ga. needs 2.25 cubic inches. All grounds together count as 1 wire, as do internal clamps. Every device (such as a switch or a receptacle on a single strap) counts as double the wire size it connects to. Rough add-up (" standing for cubic inches): One 14/2 cable in (2x2"), two ...


2

Assuming that the S's represent switches to control the lights, here are my thoughts... Generally, you do not want your lighting on the same circuit as outlets in the same room. That way if you trip a breaker with a plugged in device, your lights don't go out. This is especially helpful when trying to do the wiring itself because if the outlets and lights ...


2

Where can the problem be? The problem might be that you didn't take into account that neutral is usually tied to ground/earth. In the US this typically occurs at the point the supply enters the building.


2

Stapled to the sides of joists, or through drilled holes, is fine in this installation.


2

There are (at least) two problems with this, and the solution to both is to change to THWN (or another wet-rated labeled conductor) when you change to conduit. Problem one is that stripped NM is not labeled and not acceptable per code for that reason, as @Speedy Petey said. The second is that you are running to an external location, which means that the ...


2

If the on/off panel was done correctly, and it probably was, it has a main bonding jumper installed. I can't see any reason why you'd want to change that. So, yes; it's a sub-panel and the gounded/ing conductors should not be bonded together in the new one. If you want to verify it you'll have to remove the cover on the present panel.


2

To reduce material costs of the job. To reduce the number of holes bored through framing. To reduce the number of cables that have to be pulled.


2

This is OK provided that the wires to the fan control switch are treated as 120VAC wires as per 725.46: Class 1 Circuit Wiring Methods. Class I circuits shall be installed in accordance with Part I of Article 300 and with the wiring methods from the appropriate articles in Chapter 3. (i.e. run using NM and not communications-type cable/wire) and ...


1

The standard solution would be to either run power and neutral to the switch and then run switched power and neutral back to the lights, or to run power/neutral to a box, run a "switch loop" from there to the switch and back, and then run switched power and neutral from box to lights. It sounds like you want to do something different ... which may or may ...


1

No, you absolutely should NOT connect the grounded (neutral) conductor to the grounding (earth) conductor. If you have two ungrounded ( hot ) conductors, and you only want to use one. You can simply cap the unused conductor using a twist-on wire connector, or similar device. However, when two ungrounded conductors are run, there's almost always a reason. ...


1

I can't imagine how hard you pulled the cable to snap one of the wires. I suggest you reinstall the connectors. You probably just missed the conductor while putting them on. If that doesn't work, pull the cable back out and look for any damage. It may have been snagged on a nail or something. Measure out where the damaged point would be in the wall and ...


1

Yes, you can have splices in the panel to extend wire to reach breakers. What you cannot do is have splices where a wire enters the panel, is then spliced to another wire that exits the panel.


1

Yes you can, as long as you keep the conductors separated. However, you should likely avoid it if possible. Common practice is to keep power and communications circuits in separate stub bays. National Electrical Code allows you to put power and communication circuits in the same box, as long as all the conductors are separated by a permanent barrier or ...


1

The white wire (neutral) coming in should be directly connected to the white wire on the lamp. The black wire coming in is the hot line. The toggle switch is used to either break or connect the hot line. The black wire coming in to the lamp should be connected to one of the black wires of the switch. The other black wire from the switch should be connected ...


1

You can use twist-on wire connectors (or other approved connector), to create a "pigtail". Turn off the power. Remove the LOAD side wires from the GFCI. Using a twist-on wire connector, connect the white wire you removed from the GFCI with the white wire feeding your new receptacle and a short bit of the same size wire (6-8" should do). Do the same with ...



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