Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Yes, that's exactly what you should do. As a safety measure, while you've got the wiring exposed, double check that the hot (black and red) wires are connected to the brass-colored screw on the receptacle, the neutral (white) is connected to the silver-colored screw, and the ground is connected to the green screw.


3

If the wire for the switch and the bell that is in the existing conduit is carrying 110V, the answer is NO. You can not mix High & Low Voltage in the same conduit, so you will need to run an additional conduit to connect to the second set of terminals. Is this for your residence or for a business? I question this as you are "playing with fire", in ...


3

You have some pretty weird wiring to the light fitting. It looks like at the light fitting (fed from top-right romex at box) you would find the "ground" wire (green or bare copper in the US?) is being used as a neutral return from the light bulb. the "hot" (black) is a switched hot to the light bulb. the "neutral wire (white) is being used as a permanent ...


3

Electrical Metallic Tubing (Type EMT) Pros Protection from physical damage Larger internal area (1/2" EMT = 0.622 in. ID) Available in sizes over 2" Easy to push through closed walls and bored holes. Can be used as equipment grounding conductor Cons Requires fittings Costs slightly more ($0.256/ft.) More difficult to cut More difficult to bend ...


3

The basic technique is called "pigtailing". Cut about 4-6 inches off some wire, and pull the conductors out of the outer insulation. Do this for as many connections as you need to make. (It looks like you'll need 2 black and 2 white wires for this job.) Strip both ends. For the three way, you'll wire a black stub wire to the common terminal of one ...


2

The answer is yes; it was a problem. The wiring wasn't done correctly. I had an HVAC guy come out. He suspected that whoever installed my thermostat cheated by using some lower grade wire and doubling them up. Sure enough when he untwisted the wires from the old thermostat and checked the voltage with a multimeter we saw that the pair would give us the ...


2

Before you terminate and dead end the red wire in the box there a couple of things to consider. Since there are obviously two hots providing power to a split outlet (i.e. tab removed) it does NOT necessarily mean that half the outlet is switched. It could just be that two separate circuits supply power from two circuit breakers. The red wire may come from ...


2

If the bond between top and bottom is broken on the neutral side as well, switch the neutral wires as well as the hot wires. If it's not broken then switching only the hot wires is adequate. When switching off the circuit breaker(s) beware of the possibility (not common but possible) that the top and bottom are on different breakers.


2

I would use a pigtail (short piece of wire) between the building wiring and the socket, attached with a wire nut. The reason is pretty simple - every time you replace the socket you probably need to cut off and restrip the end of the wire. Eventually that wire gets so short that its difficult or impossible to attach the socket to. If you use the wire nuts ...


2

I WOULD NOT attach the building wiring directly to the socket. I would use some #16 or #18ga stranded leads from the socket. There needs to be some flexibility between the socket and the house wiring since even something as simple as changing lamps will move the socket around a bit, as well as expansion and contraction from the extreme heat generated by ...


2

As long as the wiring is copper, there should be no problem using the screw terminals. If you're in the US, black (hot) to brass, white (neutral) to silver.


1

You CANNOT do this without rewiring. This is a common request that most folks think is no problem. It simply cannot be done with your existing wiring. The simplest thing is to get a wire from the existing light to the new one.


1

Your question is a little unclear a diagram and pictures would help. If you want to add a light to a 3 way set up the easiest way is to run a 2 wire of the same size as the others in the circuit from the existing switched light to your new one and connect the wires color to color.


1

360W 50 Hz transformer is big and expensive. Conductive losses on 30A will be large at 12V. A reasonable approach is consider 5% losses in distribution max. For this you need the average length of cable carrying 30A from source to load. They should not be daisy chained more than 50W per FPC cable unless otherwise suggested by supplier. Lets assume 10m ...


1

Is this approach correct? Basically, yes. 1mm2 twin and earth cable (I presume that is what you are proposing) could carry up to 16A, depending on where it runs, so 1.5A is well within the headroom (assuming that you aren't talking such long runs that voltage drop becomes an issue). For lighting, however, I tend to use 1.5mm2 in preference to cable ...


1

One red wire on one screw, right? And two black wires under the other screw (or poked into those dang quick-connect holes I hate so much)? If so, that's an ordinary switch, not a three-way. If it actually has three screws on the body of the switch, though, it's a three-way... and given your description of things, there's no really good reason for that. If ...


1

If the old fixture worked, at least one of the white wires is hot. The easiest way to check which is hot is to use a non-contact tester. If the fixture is already removed, leave the two wires bundled together with a wire nut over the end. Put a wire nut on the single white wire. Turn the breaker back on. Only one of those should register on tester. That is ...


1

I would suspect your daughters iPod charging port has shorted. It is not uncommon, and a known issue with late model 4-5 phones and pods, but heavily denied by Apple. While her room's circuit is off, unplug the iPod and power strip. Then turn the circuit on and test it out with something that is known to work well, a lamp, or if you want something to pull ...


1

Toss the power strip and turn the breaker back on - you'll almost certainly be fine. The circuit breaker did its job by tripping, and you can reasonably expect it to do the same thing if you get another short or arc fault. When you replace the power strip itself, make sure that the one you get has its own over-current protection.


1

The answer is it depends on the applaince. As long as the appliance does not expressly forbid using it on a 30A circuit you should be fine. You'll be able to change the plug and put on a 14-30P plug, just ignore the silver terminal (neutral).


1

Generally, an appliance wired with a 6-20P plug calls for maximum 20A over current protection. The reason why different plugs exist and adapters do not. You need a 20A breaker if you install a 6-20R receptacle. The neutral would be caped at the outlet. NEMA 6 (3 prong) is for appliances that don't need 120v for secondary devices. NEC article 406.7: ...


1

The C wire, not to be confused with R or RC is the return path. Think of it as a ground, though technically not. Based on the information above, none of the wires O, B, W, G, R, Y, will work for C. So they can not be jumped over to the C connection. The C wire, usually the brown wire on the transformer, the low voltage (24v) is the common. However, no ...


1

NO. You CANNOT extend this kitchen receptacle circuit to feed lighting. Both Canada (I believe) and the US have restrictions on this. You must find a different source to feed this lighting load. If you are removing it altogether then I would say it is probably OK, but WHY are you removing it? There is a very real chance you are creating a different violation ...


1

The third insulated conductor is only called a "traveler" in the context of a three way switch (when two light switches control the same lights). In this context, the third conductor is just another hot. Usually, when two hots are connected to an outlet like that, the break-away tab is removed, and one outlet is always on while the other is switched. (the ...


1

It's definitely a interpretation issue with the local inspectors. You can improve the installation in the picture by following the guidelines in 110.26 they may allow the wire within the working space about the panel to be not subject to damage but the water line should be rerouted to be outside the working space described in 110.26 also the wire should be ...


1

The YELLOW or Y terminal at the furncae/ air handler is a dummy terminal for convenience, it is not required to be used, you could send Yellow directly to the AC unit out doors. Common will be used since the Common leg of power comes from the transformer which is in the furnace. The Yellow going to common likely if you trace it back it in fact is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible