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9

National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 1 General Article 100 Definitions Disconnecting Means. A device, or group of devices, or other means by which the conductors of a circuit can be disconnected from their source of supply. This can include a switch, a circuit breaker, a cord and plug connection (sometimes), or a group of the ...


9

It's probably just a broken switch. My guess would be that the switch contact is worn out to the point that it does not make contact, but jiggling it a bit (by turning off and on again) may solve the problem, at least for a little while. Replacing a light switch is a pretty simple matter for a DIYer. I recommend swapping it out and seeing if that solves ...


7

Certainly sounds like you have a wire/outlet that is connected to two different circuits, given your symptoms. First - when dealing with something whacky like this, just shut off the main breaker if you need to, say, cut it. If it's still hot with the main off, you have some really interesting wiring going on. And if, for some reason that should never ...


6

So, the box in the ceiling has two pair coming into it. Two black white pair. One comes from the power source. Think of that one as Line and Neutral. The other one runs to the light switch wherever that is. ( If you open the switch, you should find a black and white on the two screws. ) Therefore, the two black wires are connected and beep your ...


6

This is NOT okay. Use a multimeter (or voltmeter) to test the grounded (neutral) conductor, to see if you're getting the proper voltage between it and the ungrounded (hot) conductor. If it tests okay, wire the receptacle up the way it's supposed to. If not, you'll have to trace back through the circuit, and try to figure out what's wrong.


5

If that was installed in 1958, the wire may or may not have PVC insulation. If it's the old rubber insulation, it's going to be brittle. Bending the wires could crack and compromise the insulation. Also, it's virtually guaranteed that there is no ground wire in that fixture. You should check local electrical code to make sure that replacing the fixture ...


5

Toggle switches can be used as disconnects (typically in cases like 225.39(A) below). A very literal interpretation of the code below would allow for properly rated toggle switches to serve as your disconnect if your circuits are being fed directly from your main panel (because a sub panel would negate the need for another disconnect), but in the case of ...


4

You can leave the ground wire bare, it's fine. As long as the other wires are capped off so that no bare metal is exposed, then those are fine, too. You can bend the wires and stuff them all into the box, then put a blank faceplate on the box. You cannot cover the box with sheetrock or anything. You have to leave it accessible.


4

Yes, you wired it wrong. :) The red wire is another hot leg. This is a common installation when the electrician is providing wires for a ceiling fan with lights (to be independently switched). The red wire shares a common neutral with the black wire, hence the three white wires. You should keep the white wires connected. Disconnect the red wire and cap ...


4

If your entire branch circuit is using 12 AWG wire, then yes. Swap the old breaker with a new 20 Amp GFCI breaker.


4

You are on the right track. As it comes from the store, the upper and lower sections of standard double outlets are connected by the small tab connecting the brass plates under the screws on either side. To separate those sections so that one half is constantly on and the other half is switched, break the tab on the hot side of the outlet. This is usually ...


4

You don't. If you're fishing cable, you don't have to secure it. National Electrical Code 334.30 Securing and Supporting. (B) Unsupported Cables. Nonmetallic-sheathed cable shall be permitted to be unsupported where the cable: (1) Is fished between access points through concealed spaces in finished buildings or structures and supporting is ...


4

There's a decent discussion about making aluminum wire connections over here: What's the best way of replacing a plug or switch in a house with aluminum wiring? If there is #12 Al wire on the circuit, the breaker should be 15A. #10 aluminum wire can have a 20A breaker, and you shouldn't normally see anything like #14 aluminum. Or you could just pull new ...


4

As far as I understand it, since the 2002 version of National Electrical Code, only a single branch circuit or feeder is allowed to supply a building (225.30). Though it's possible that your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) allows it under one of the exceptions, or there are local amendments. There's also the consideration that the NEC requires a ...


4

Leave just enough "extra" wire to route the wire along the edge of the board so it looks clean like the image below. Otherwise, do not bother leaving extra wire. You can splice more wire within the panel if you need to move things around later. Leaving a lot of additional coiled wire to try to account for the future could result in excess heat build-up and ...


4

If this area is an unfinished area of a basement or crawl space then GFI protection is definitely required for ALL 120V, 15A & 20A receptacles. No exceptions, other than for fire or burglar alarm systems. The furnace must be dedicated and should NOT have a cord and plug. 2011/14 NEC 422.12 Central Heating Equipment Central heating equipment ...


4

I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


3

For anyone wanting the code reference as to why using a red (or black) conductor as a neutral is not allowed: 2014 National Electric Code 200.6 Means of Identifying Grounded Conductors. (A) Sizes 6 AWG or Smaller. An insulated grounded conductor of 6 AWG or smaller shall be identified by one of the following means: (1) A continuous white ...


3

What is the wattage rating of the switch? Many dimmers are 300 watts (or less if they are trimmed to fit in crowded boxes). You are burning 390 watts. You may be overloading the switch. Your instincts about LEDs is correct, assuming the switch is LED compatible. You also need to be sure to select dimmable LED bulbs.


3

It sounds like the two black wire with the pigtail are the incoming hot and a branch hot to another location, such as the outlet. The other black attached to the switch is probably the switched hot that goes to the fixture being controlled. You can verify this by turning the switch to off, making sure all the wires and terminals are clear and not touching ...


3

I'd just install a small sub panel. What if you end up wanting another circuit for a fridge, or a ridiculous home entertainment system, or computer or music equipment, a small instant-on water heater, a handy outdoor outlet or two for electric yard tools or something else in the man cave? But my biggest excuse for suggesting the subpanel is that, as ...


3

From the information that you gave so far it would seem pretty conclusive that the red wire has broken open between your test outlet box and the power panel. Did the red wire circuit outlets ever work? If they did work at one time can you think of any key events that may have occurred between them working and not working? Think about things like ...


3

To do this properly, You'll likely have to run a new circuit. Since you haven't posted the make, model, or nameplates of the equipment, it's impossible to say for sure if these two devices can be on the same circuit. If they can, the solution is to extend the circuit using approved methods and materials. If they can't, the solution is to run a new circuit. ...


3

Yes, that is precisely correct. Though I prefer red tape, but that's a preference, not a requirement to go buy a roll. Nicer (IMHO) because you can easily mark switched hots whether they be black or white.


3

There's no technical reason that he can't move the boxes. It would certainly be more elegant. My best guess is that your electrician doesn't like drywall repair/ painting. If the ceiling is textured, that's a strong disincentive, as matching texture is hard. He'll definitely save you money with his approach.


2

Extension cords are not supposed to be used for permanent fixtures. These fixtures are supposed to be hard wired or directly plugged into a permanent outlet. A common approach to solve this problem would be to install a switched outlet on the ceiling near the fluorescent lights. In many jurisdictions, you could use non-metallic cable to run the outlet and ...


2

What you are describing is called a Multi-wire Branch Circuit, and it is completely legal (given that it's done properly). The first problem, is that it doesn't should like the breakers feeding this circuit are handle tied together. It should be feed by a double pole breaker, or the two breakers handles should be tied together. You should not be able to ...


2

You have a new-style switch loop -- the current (2014) NEC now requires switch loops to have a neutral, not just a hot and a switched. Switch the black and red wires on the light, and the white and red wires on the switch -- this means the light goes to red and white, and the switch goes to black and red, with the white wire in the switch box capped off ...


2

It sounds like two of your red wires form a switch loop to one of your switches. The remaining red wire is the hot (I believe called active in Australia?) coming into your ceiling. By connecting them all together, you have wired your light (and switch) directly to your unswitched power, which is why it stays on. You'll need a multimeter, voltage tester, or ...


2

You may upgrade the breaker to 20 A if the wire is 12 AWG copper, but you may not if the wire is 12 AWG aluminum per Table 310.15(B)(16) (quote is from NEC:2011) -- Note, aluminum wiring for 12 AWG is uncommon in homes constructed within the past 30 years: You will also need to upgrade the outlet if it is the only receptacle on the circuit per ...



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