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28

Test Tools In approximate descending order of safety (though the professional multimeter could arguably be higher if you are careful about how you use it) Voltage tester A professional electrician would very likely have one of these: If you expect to do occasional DIY electrical work in the rest of your life, you should consider buying something like ...


6

Sure, you're always allowed to use oversize wire. You are designating the circuit 20A, you could use anything 12 gauge and up. This is absolutely fine, there is nothing wrong with this, in fact it's a good idea if it's a long run and copper is no object. You just have to contend with physical issues: the outlet (and possibly the breaker) is not listed to ...


6

The AFCI wire needs to connect to the neutral bus. Put it on the other side, or add on to the length of the wire with a wirenut.


6

This is trouble, but easily solved. Simply swap out the 50 ampere GFCI breaker, for a 15 ampere GFCI breaker. You'll possibly have to use pigtails to connect to the breaker, as it may not accept the size wire used for the existing circuit. As "subpanels" seem to be quite popular around here, I'm surprised it hasn't been suggested yet. You could always ...


6

If the fan has a pull chain as well as the remote the pullchain MUST be on high speed. The remote control only slows the fan down. Bottom line is no, you cannot re-wire a ceiling fan like this to make it go faster.


5

Yes, you can use that circuit to feed an outdoor outlet. However, there are several challenges which depend upon the choices you make. The easiest would be to reuse the yard end cutoff switchbox as a subpanel. That way it can easily accommodate #6 wire. If it was wired as 240 volts with a neutral (white wire besides red, black, and bare or green), it ...


5

Junctions and terminations must be in a box, and the box must be accessible. You can't bury it under a floor. Unless you have an idea where the source is, you'll need to treat the wires as though they're live.


5

RedGrittyBrick has an excellent description of tools. I would like to add some more to the topic of procedures. Whichever tool you choose, use it in the way that gives the most assurances that the result is accurate, and then still act as though the circuit is hot. Test with the power on to verify that your tool is working. Test with the power off to ...


4

The gauge of wire you use depends on: how much voltage drop is acceptable. You can use a voltage drop calculator to estimate this. Voltage drop depends on the voltage, current, length of wire, and resistance of wire (i.e. the wire gauge, material, construction). how much heat is acceptable. This depends partly on the specific application, and also the ...


4

Neutral and ground should only be bonded at the service equipment. This could be at the service drop, the meter, or the service disconnect (250.24(A)(1)). Looks like the neutral is bonded in your main panel, via the bonding screw. The second panel is then fed using four wires, to keep ground and neutral separate.


4

Sounds like you might have a bad neutral. Contact the utility, and have them check it. This is a dangerous situation, that need immediate attention. Voltage swings can wreak havoc on sensitive electronics, so you may want to use UPS to protect them.


4

They are apparently considering the attic accessible although it is not readily accessible. Most furnaces in basements have NM cable protected with EMT conduit and that is probably where they are equating that situation to this one. However, in a normal basement the cable would be readily accessible, meaning you can walk right up to it without any tools or ...


3

Wire colors with HVAC wiring are non-standardized, so the colors themselves don't help much. Your furance/air handler should have a control board with terminals labelled R, W, Y, G and C. There should be an existing wire that connects to all of these (though maybe not C) that goes to your thermostat. If anything is different in your setup, please update ...


3

If space permits, you could also run an additional isolated neutral buss bar (connected to the existing neutral bar, and isolated from the box/ground.) My main panel has 3 interconnected ground buss bars (left, top, right - power entry at bottom) to keep it convenient. Small change in the grand scheme of things. Use adequately sized wire for the ...


3

From what I can see in the fuzzy pic, someone wanted a double-gang outlet where there was a single-gang box. They apparently didn't want to cut the wall at all. There's probably no concern as far as safety, but pop an outlet tester into it to be sure.


3

Have you read the manufacturer's documentation? The switches in the remote likely are for setting the transmitters frequency, and have nothing to do with fan speed. Usually fans have a speed selector switch (pull chain) that allows you to select LOW, MED, HIGH, or OFF. If that switch is in the LOW setting, that's as fast as the fan will spin despite ...


2

The switch you installed can be wired for either single pole or 3-way configurations. The red wire is a traveller for the 3-way setup. It is not used in the single pole setup. Capping it is right.


2

I am guessing you are in the Philippines, in a postwar development with Euro-style 220V/neutral power. 12 square mm is not a common Euro wire size. Philippines use American Wire Gauge so "12mm" is actually 12 AWG. This is too small for your job. You need 10 AWG. The early electrifications were done to the American standard of 120/240VAC split phase. ...


2

You don't have a 30 amp circuit. Your wire is 12 gauge, so you have a 20 amp circuit with the wrong breaker. Replace the breaker with 20A Feel free to install your 15 or 20 amp GFCI since they are legal on 20A circuits For that matter, you could just install a GFCI breaker. Price both ways. Gadgets which run on 120V/30A are almost nonexistent. Nobody ...


2

No. You cannot install a 20 ampere receptacle on a 30 ampere circuit. Section 210.21(B)(3) of the National Electrical Code, says that a receptacle on a 30 ampere branch circuit with multiple outlets must be rated for 30 amperes. Therefore, installing a 20 ampere receptacle would be a violation. If you think about this, it makes complete sense. If the ...


2

This is a "lost neutral" and it is very dangerous and should be dealt with swiftly. Your house has 240V power with "neutral" in the middle. That gives you two sides. The neutral from the transformer forces each side to be 120V. What if it didn't? Then each side would be "whatever" in voltage! (but they would add up to 240V.) That is happening. The ...


2

You have to run a separate grounding conductor between the panels. If the second panel is in another building, you need to install a grounding electrode at that building as well. At least that's how it's done in the US, if you're covered by NEC.


2

Probably not dangerous but it does sound broke. You will need to get it replaced or do it youself. Always make sure the power is off first. Good luck!


2

You can always use larger size wire, however, you may run into a few problems doing so. Terminal size The fist problem you'll have, is that the 6 AWG wire cannot be directly terminated at the new 20 ampere breaker. 20 ampere breakers tend to only accept 14 AWG to 8 AWG wire, though this may vary a bit by brand. To solve this, you're going to have to use ...


2

Unfortunatly, a 20 amp breaker is not rated for #6 wire but you could pigtail the wire with #12. Not very pretty but actually legal by the code. You will then have to pigtail the receptacle with #12 also. Here is the problem, with 3 #6s and a pigtailed receptacle you would need at least 19.5 cubic inches of box space. Even a deep device box is only 18 ...


2

It's not the best idea but it is perfectly legal. Make sure your boxes are all rated to handle the capacity of all the #6 wire in it along with the receptacle(s). This is one of the reasons it is not the best idea, too many issues like box fill to take into account. It may be easier to splice the cable to a length of 12/2 inside and feed that to an outside ...


2

There are basically two types of wire tracer: audible frequency transmitter and receiver often used with telephone wires to detect them in floors, walls, etc. It is expected the receiver can be placed within a few inches of where the traced wire potentially is. low frequency RF (400–500 kHz) intended for detecting buried wires or inside structures ...


2

The simplest thing to do is to turn the breaker on and figure out which black wire is supplying the current. (This is arguably one of the more dangerous approaches, but it is safe if you follow precautions like have someone guarding the wires so they are not touched while the power is on.) Use a multimeter and test the voltage between the ground wire and ...


2

No problem. As long as you install a double pole breaker, make the white wire an ungrounded conductor (including marking as you describe), and change all the receptacles and devices to 240 volt devices.


2

The wire on the pump is not rated to be exposed or cord connected. You will need to mount the pump inside an enclosure such as a Hoffman box or equivalent. Then you can terminate a raceway or cable to the enclosure and the wiring will be protected inside. Since RV's are covered by the National Electrical Code, this will satisfy the NEC. Good luck!



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