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Rip the walls open. Unless someone had the sense (they almost certainly did not) to run the network cables in conduit, that's generally the only practical method to replace wires thoughout a house. It's messy and tedious and involves a lot of cleanup. Might be a lot less hassle to check for connector issues first - a 2007 house would almost certainly be ...


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Many switches that need a neutral have equivalent versions from other brands that do not need a neutral. You may be able to find a switch that has the functionality you want without doing additional wiring. While current code requires a neutral at switches, you are allowed to replace existing switches without rewiring if the neutral is not present. If that ...


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You will need a double pole breaker, or two breakers connected by handle ties for a multi-wire branch circuit. If you're wiring outdoor receptacles, you'll likely want GFCI breakers, instead of AFCI. You should be able to shuffle breakers around in the panel, to accommodate the double pole breaker. All that said. It sounds like you are quite ...


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Mike quotes the code (300.13B Device Removal) but misunderstands what it means. The paragraph's 1st sentence starts out, "In multiwire branch circuits,". That means where 2 or 3 circuits with 1 shared neutral wire are passing through a box. You'll probably never see this kind of wiring in a home, but if you have 2 or 3 circuits sharing a neutral in the same ...


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I am a commercial electrician in the US and I'm not very familiar with UK standards or code, but I should be able to help a little. From what I understand, a typical household runs lighting on a 5A fused circuit. Watts = Volts*Amps = 230*5 = 1150 Watts maximum total on the lighting circuit. It the US we us a maximum of 80% of the rated load, which would ...


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Whoever told you the meter was the point of disconnect was dead wrong. The main panel or disconnect is the first means of overcurrent or disconnect. THIS is where your neutral bond must happen. 2011 NEC Article 250 Grounding and Bonding II. System Grounding 250.24 Grounding Service-Supplied Alternating-Current Systems (B) Main ...


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The grounded (neutral) conductor is bonded to ground in one location. It's common to bond the grounded (neutral) bus and the grounding bus in the panel, but it's not a requirement. The grounded (neutral) conductor can be bonded before the panel, but you'd then be required to keep the grounding and grounded (neutral) conductors separate after that point. So ...


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Or: A completely different approach to the problem. If the compressor is really the only thing driving you to want more power in the garage, and the electrical service in the garage, as it stands, would suit your needs adequately otherwise...move the compressor. Build it a "doghouse" in the yard where you can run a dedicated (and shorter) electrical line ...


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tl;dr - if you are going to all the work, and a subpanel, you presumably want a bit more than 20 amps (think it needs to be 30 amps minimum for code these days, and 60 amps is probably better.) You'll have to dig a ditch. At that point, my opinionated opinion is that you should go ahead and put in conduit, and an additional conduit for any current or future ...


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Terminals R and C are a 24V AC power supply, from a transformer on the control board in the furnace. The control board also has relays: one is for the fan, one is for heat. One side of the coils of these relays are connected to the G and W terminals respectively, and the other side is connected to C (one side of that 24V AC power). Your thermostat is ...



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