Hot answers tagged

35

Test Tools In approximate descending order of safety (though the professional multimeter could arguably be higher if you are careful about how you use it) Voltage tester A professional electrician would very likely have one of these: If you expect to do occasional DIY electrical work in the rest of your life, you should consider buying something like ...


8

The common practice for future expansion is to install the box and put a blank cover on it. That eliminates the requirement of chopping into the drywall to find the wire. It also eliminates the need to create as-built documents and store them for future reference so you can find the wires later. My recommendation is to install device boxes with ENT ...


7

RedGrittyBrick has an excellent description of tools. I would like to add some more to the topic of procedures. Whichever tool you choose, use it in the way that gives the most assurances that the result is accurate, and then still act as though the circuit is hot. Test with the power on to verify that your tool is working. Test with the power off to ...


7

Sounds like white (neutral) isn't connected somewhere. Find it and fix it!


6

If the fan has a pull chain as well as the remote the pullchain MUST be on high speed. The remote control only slows the fan down. Bottom line is no, you cannot re-wire a ceiling fan like this to make it go faster.


6

This is trouble, but easily solved. Simply swap out the 50 ampere GFCI breaker, for a 15 ampere GFCI breaker. You'll possibly have to use pigtails to connect to the breaker, as it may not accept the size wire used for the existing circuit. As "subpanels" seem to be quite popular around here, I'm surprised it hasn't been suggested yet. You could always ...


6

Here is what the National Electrical Code says: 250.64 Grounding Electrode Conductor Installation. Grounding electrode conductors at the service, at each building or structure where supplied by a feeder(s) or branch circuit(s), or at a separately derived system shall be installed as specified in 250.64(A) through (F). (C) Continuous. Except as ...


5

Junctions and terminations must be in a box, and the box must be accessible. You can't bury it under a floor. Unless you have an idea where the source is, you'll need to treat the wires as though they're live.


5

That Federal Pacific panel has to go as they are dangerous. As far as concerns about your skill, you sound like that particular kind of newbie who is well capable of learning to do it all safely and well; however my hunch is you are still thinking too much, and need to read a little more. It's OK, we all start there. Normally, just replacing a sub panel ...


5

Try using an 11b extension ring or a 1900 extension ring. Actually made to deepen a junction box, but should work for this application.


5

With a 120/240V single split-phase system, there are two possible outcomes. Separate legs If the branch circuits feeding the device are on separate legs of the service, then the tab will be creating a direct short-circuit between the legs. This will cause a high current through the circuits, which should trip one of the breakers fairly quickly. Same ...


5

First note -- a GaN green LED can provide acceptable brightness at sub-milliamp currents, so the amount of energy a status LED on a GFCI draws can easily be reduced to something truly insignificant. Second -- GFCIs themselves draw a small amount of current for the operating electronics. Older models draw a dozen mA or so, while newer ones need less than ...


4

However, as the existing installation and googling show, it is a common practice to use 2.5 mm2 or thicker wires for everything but lighting, and 1.5 mm2 for lighting. I wonder why? Aren't these standards outdated? Home wiring has been standardized over the last 100 years. More and more loads are being added to receptacle circuits while lighting is ...


4

They are apparently considering the attic accessible although it is not readily accessible. Most furnaces in basements have NM cable protected with EMT conduit and that is probably where they are equating that situation to this one. However, in a normal basement the cable would be readily accessible, meaning you can walk right up to it without any tools or ...


4

Your problem is that you have looped/paralleled the neutral (white) wire both through and around the 3-way switches, which can be interpreted as a NEC 300.3(B)/310.10(H) violation. What I would do instead is run a 14/4 between the two 3-way switches, with black as the unswitched hot and red and blue as the travelers, then run a 14/3 from the 2nd switch box ...


4

The 2014 NEC now requires the dishwasher to be on GFCI. The 2014 NEC does not require the dishwasher to be on an individual circuit (it never has). So, you could feed either receptacle on the load side of the other with a GFCI. Or you could put the whole circuit on a GFCI breaker. If your locality is still on the 2011 NEC the GFCI requirement was not in ...


3

Have you read the manufacturer's documentation? The switches in the remote likely are for setting the transmitters frequency, and have nothing to do with fan speed. Usually fans have a speed selector switch (pull chain) that allows you to select LOW, MED, HIGH, or OFF. If that switch is in the LOW setting, that's as fast as the fan will spin despite ...


3

TLDR: Because they said so. I can't speak for Europe but I bet they arrived at their standards the same way the US did. The standards are not outdated. Much the opposite: they are extremely well-refined. It doesn't make an sense to someone with an electrical engineering background. Code seems to ignores a bunch of basics. True. The authors of the ...


3

Typically a 220v/30 amp Dryer circuit would utilize 10/3 with ground. According to this voltage drop table, it looks like for 100' run you would want to up-size the wire to #8 copper, to maintain voltage drop less than 3%. So you have arrived at the correct conclusion within your question to use 8/3 with ground.


3

I am a licensed Oregon electrician and it IS 100% legal to do your own wiring including planning. It needs to meet code or it will not pass inspection. First I would never update to a new panel for a home with a 100A even as a sub. I would put in at least a 150A panel with more breakers, the cost difference is not that big. 100A is the minimum size allowed ...


3

Bottom line: The breaker MUST be sized to be equal to or less than what the wire permits in ADDITION to what the manufacture of the appliance says to use.* The breaker can NOT be greater than what the wire permits. Period. #10 gauge size wire is sized for at most 30 Amps. Therefore, at most a 30A breaker should be used. Most washers require no ...


2

There is no rule in the UK preventing you from putting central heating and sockets on the same circuit (which may or may not be a ring). In my experiance a dedicated circuit for central heating is the exception not the rule. I'm not sure why you would want to make it into a ring, making it into a ring would mean adding an extra cable which would seem to ...


2

For conduit, fish tape is choice. But for residential remodeling, PEX is so much better! I've used 3/4" and 1/2" PEX pipe many times as fish tape for electrical remodeling (1/2" is usually preferable). I prefer PEX to fish tape because you can move PEX side to side in the wall void; the stiffness allows you to push PEX more quickly; it doesn't get hung up as ...


2

I see those ferrules all the time on the lights I get from those friendly east Asian purveyors of sensibly priced goods. They are supplied in brown/hot and blue/neutral, which are Europe and UK color standards. European use screw terminal blocks to terminate wires, so those ferrules work rather well with them. They also increase the effective wire size ...


2

Modern GFCI devices will not set if the LINE and LOAD are reversed. If there's power on the LOAD wires, the device will not (and should not) set. It sounds like the GFCI is working as designed. You're going to have to figure out how both circuits are wired, to determine if this is intentional or accidental. If it's intentional, you can simply cap one set ...


2

It's difficult to tell for sure, as I'm not sure where all the wires in the box go. But it looks like the lights are run in series, rather than in parallel as they should be. To fix it. Turn off the power and verify that it's off. Connect all the black wires together in one twist-on wire connector. Connect all the white wire together in the other twist-on ...


2

A bundle in confined air is not the same as a bundle in e.g. fibreglass insulation. The latter will get much hotter. I don't know about Europe, but for 2x1.5mm^2 conductors (you don't have to count ground), ASNZS3008.1.2 (assuming 30C air, 15C ground, 75C insulation) allows only 10A if they are completely surrounded by thermal insulation (which they may ...


2

It seems like the space under the cabinets is inaccessible and would be treated like the interior of a wall. In that case, you could merely cut a hole in the wall at the back bottom of the cabinet that will hold the heater and continue your cabling into the opening that will hold the heater. Once the cable is attached to the heater and the heater is ...


2

Take a hint from how power company electricians approach (literally) this situation: if you think you're very sure that the power is off, then there should be no danger from attaching[2] a (higher rated [1]) grounded conductor to the circuit in question [3]. [1] The ground "strap" must be of higher rated amperage than the (circuit breakers, conductor ...


2

Depending on whether you have an electrical dryer or a gas dryer, the answer will be different. I am going to assume you are in the US, and using an electrical dryer. Then the calculation goes like this: Assuming you have an electrical dryer, typical power use might be anywhere from 1800 W to 5000 W source. But let's assume the dryer you have is right at ...



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