Hot answers tagged

15

Loose connections can produce heat and cause this problem. The fix is to disconnect and reconnect properly. Spring-loaded "stab connections" are particularly likely to suffer this problem; screw terminals (or shove-in terminals that are clamped by tightening a screw) are more reliable. If in doubt, outlets are cheap and you might want to simply replace this ...


9

I would suggest the use of a weatherproof (WR) box extender. One of which could be installed over the existing box giving you sides on to which to connect the PVC conduit. The following is an example. No endorsement of specific products is implied.


6

Note that the wire doesn't care which is positive and which is negative. Nor do the speakers, really; what matters is that both/all speakers be in phase with each other. So if the same side of the speaker wire is always hooked to the same terminal at the signal source (amp), and the same side is always hooked to the same terminal of the speakers (even if ...


5

Sure. Pull four appropriately sized conductors from the main panel, to the new shop panel. Install a properly sized double pole breaker in the main panel, and connect the four conductors properly in the main panel. Connect the four conductors properly in the shop panel, making sure the neutral bar is isolated from ground. Install a grounding electrode ...


5

Those are telephone wires. Looks like the cabling is CAT3, but I can't quite tell from the picture. The "red sensor" things aren't sensors, they are just splicers that are connecting two runs together. Google for "red telephone splicer" and you'll get tons of pictures of similar ones, as well as instructions on how to use them.


4

What you actually want is useful power, which is measured in Watts (W), itself defined as Volts x Amps. Common USA outlets can't deliver much power. That step-up/down transformer is no help. It can change voltage, but it can't change the amount of power the outlet can serve. A sub-panel is a straightforward affair as Tester101 describes. My only ...


4

For all of the questions you asked: Consult your town's building department (or equivalent if it goes by a different name where you are from). They should be able to pull the permit history for your home if requested and tell you what type of electrical work requires a permit. If you find the that work was done without a permit: If you are solely ...


4

You have not stated any reason that would appear to prevent the obvious solution (if you consider it a problem at all) of running the network wiring along the face of the wall at the same level as the server rack, or roughly 12" below the power conduit. If the basement/crawlspace floods enough to flood the server rack you probably should rethink the location ...


4

If you use a 100A breaker your main in the mobile home you will need #3 copper wire to feed the sub the sub panel. A 60 Amp breaker in the main panel should provide enough power from the loads listed this would require #6 copper wire. You will need to run both hots a ground and neutral. In the sub the ground and neutral buses need to be isolated. Many ...


3

On 50A circuits, the rule is one breaker - one homerun - one outlet (NEC 210.23) The only exception is circuits which supply only cooking appliances (210.23C). If you want to use two devices on one circuit, unplug the one you're not using and plug in the one you are. It may be legal to feed two outlets with 2 breakers in a sub-panel. However I would think ...


3

Look closer at the insulation - there's nearly always a physical clue, such as tiny ridges on one wire, not on the other.


3

Assuming only one fixture controlled by that switch, you seem to have a typical switch loop here. Connect per this diagram:


3

You'll need to replace the cable in the conduit with 3 6AWG THHN/THWN dual rated wires + a 10AWG bare copper ground. Using the tables from chapter 9 and assuming concentric stranded conductors and a Schedule 80 conduit, this yields 32*3 + 5 = 101mm^2 of conduit area used out of a maximum of 105mm^2 for a 3/4" conduit. (Trying to use an insulated wire for ...


3

If the wires are for low voltage application such as connecting 12V up to LED Strip lighting then you should consider just using twist on wire connectors instead of soldering. These have a decided advantage in that they can be removed for future wire changes and they provide an insulated cover over the wire join. To keep strain off the low voltage wiring ...


3

Your current plan is no good -- first off, 400.8 point 1 forbids the use of cords as a replacement for permanent wiring (stuffing a cord down a conduit certainly counts, and is also prohibited explicitly by 400.8 point 6). Second, 400.9 prohibits the splicing of cord during installation. Third, wire splices need to be in a junction box so that they can be ...


3

Your hammer drill doesn't seem very high power (with max 10A at 120V, it's max 1200W), so probably you will be better off purchasing an industrial battery-powered hammer drill of comparable power like this one (note the 36V battery pack rating, well higher than more hobbyist tools, which rate at less than 20V) or this one (disclaimer: just did a quick search ...


3

I will assume that you live in a region where fake ground pins are common. (In my own experience I've found that "fake" ground pins are uncommon or even abnormal in the USA, but I have seen them in the UK.) To check if it really is a "fake" ground pin, you could: Confirm if the broken pin was actually metal, not plastic or similar. If plastic, it was ...


3

Technically, the only way to accomplish what you're asking is to use a double pole 20A GFCI breaker, as there is no such thing as multi-wire branch circuit GFCI receptacle. Preferably, if it existed, you'd use a double pole 20A DFCI "Dual GFCI + AFCI" breaker, but until then your only option is the GFCI double pole. Credit goes to SpeedyPetey for ...


2

To find if you have daisy-chained connections; easy: Count the sockets/outlets. If you have 4 sockets, see if you have 4 cables ending up at the entry point of the phone service. On ebay you can get a network tester for under $4 (I think ebay shows it to me in danish currency) "LAN Network/Phone Cable Tester RJ11 RJ12 RJ45 Cat5" It will only show if you ...


2

Yes, it is okay to use 12-2 cable to supply lighting fixtures. The other answer indicates that it even with 12-2 you have to use a 15A breaker for lighting circuits which is not strictly correct. If the entire circuit is 12AWG (other than fixture wires), then a 20A breaker may be used. If only part of the circuit is 12AWG while other parts are 14AWG (other ...


2

At this time the project only encompasses switches and outlets. Getting into other fixtures and replacing wire nuts or terminals with 'alumiconn' connectors will be a separate effort. Just a couple of tips I found out working with ALR While you can still buy CO/ALR rated switches and outlets, I've only found them in regular outlets and single/3/4-way ...


2

Hooboy. This may be prohibitive to bring to full code, so let me discuss some options to get the most safety increase for the least buck. Romex NM-B is not legal for direct-burial or for running in conduit. But what really has me spooked is bootlegging a neutral off that ground wire. If anything breaks in that ground wire, it will energize every ground in ...


2

As long as the ungrounded (hot) conductors of the circuit are fed by different legs of the service, then there's no problem with the wiring. According to modern codes, the breakers need to at least have a handle tie. However, since the installation presumably predates the code, it does not have to be changed (unless you're doing work that requires it). If ...


2

Sure you can do that, as long as the total number of outlets on that circuit doesn't exceed the maximum allowed (In Canada we are allowed 12 on a 15A circuit) Since you're adding a light, you will be increasing the number of outlets on that circuit by 1, so you should count all the receptacles (each duplex receptacle counts as 1 outlet even if you're not ...


2

In the main panel, put the neutral where all the other neutrals are. Put the ground where all the other grounds are. Good chance they are all going to the same bus, that is fine in a main panel. In the sub-panel, yes, ground and neutral must be separated.


2

Good question! DOC - to answer your question, (for 240 volt application) the two BLACK wires go to a 2-Pole 20A breaker and the white goes to the ground bus or a bonded neutral bar. Here is a cut sheet for a unit similar to yours (and similar to those that we install on a daily basis: http://www.five-two-one.com/pdf/LT521SPD_Web.pdf Hope this helps you!


2

That wire is distinguished by ridges on one side and writing on the other. It is up to you to decide for yourself how to allocate them. And it really doesn't matter with speakers as long as you are consistent. For what it's worth, in 120/230 mains wiring, there is a standard that the ridged wire is neutral. In a DC system, a common convention is to ...


2

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab Figure 1. (a) 3-wire circuit. (b) 2-wire circuit. You need a 3-way (as in "positions"), 2-pole, centre-off, switch for each blind. ( Note that "3-way switch" in North America means a two-way changeover switch as used in stairs lighting.) Figure 1a shows how to wire it with three wires ...


2

If you just want a timer, it's easy to buy a line-voltage timer switch that you can drop-in where the current fan's on/off switch resides. If you want a thermostat, as the comments said you can find a line-voltage thermostat. THen you just need to run the hot feed from the on/off switch to the hermostat and then on to the fan. Another option would be to ...



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