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6

That is tar from the old insulation, that's why it is sticky. I don't know why or how it happens, but old insulation had tar in the paper, and it is very common. It is not scorching or melting from overheating. Take a utility knife and try to gently scrape some of the black away. You should see it's just on the surface. It's nothing to worry about.


5

Yes, that's exactly what you should do. As a safety measure, while you've got the wiring exposed, double check that the hot (black and red) wires are connected to the brass-colored screw on the receptacle, the neutral (white) is connected to the silver-colored screw, and the ground is connected to the green screw.


5

No, in a situation like this absolutely not. The breaker in this case would need to be 15A. Question is, WHY? Why use #14 wire when the circuit is already #12? Stick with what is there and keep the breaker 20A. In some cases, such as in a kitchen, laundry or bath, you'd be creating a violation doing it like you show in that diagram. And don't be confused ...


4

It looks like the owner has set up the entire house for phone using only one pair of wires from each cat5 cable, which is fine. I like the plywood switchboard. It's very configurable if not pretty. And it's tidy, so I expect you'll hear about it if you monkey around with it too much. Those beige boxes are RJ11 jacks just like you said. It looks like ...


4

The yellow cables are probably Cat5e, which has 4 pairs of wires. (The beige cables are probably Cat 3, which might only have 2 pairs of wire). A single phone line only requires 1 pair, so as you can see the other pairs are just twisted off. You definitely can reuse the cable for ethernet access, but you will lose the phone jack obviously. Here are some ...


3

The basic technique is called "pigtailing". Cut about 4-6 inches off some wire, and pull the conductors out of the outer insulation. Do this for as many connections as you need to make. (It looks like you'll need 2 black and 2 white wires for this job.) Strip both ends. For the three way, you'll wire a black stub wire to the common terminal of one ...


3

I've labeled some things in your photo, that might help you understand what's going on. The wires coming up into the panel are your service conductors, of which you have two "hot" and one "neutral". From there you have "hot" branch-circuit conductors, which are connected through circuit breakers. There's also a branch-circuit "neutral", for each branch ...


3

The beige boxes are standard surface mount telephone jacks. Disconnecting them will disable the phone jacks in the house (which you say you mostly aren't using). The easiest way to splice the ends would be to Terminate the ends with an RJ-45 connector, and then use a coupler to connect the two wires. If you are trying to connect more than two of the ...


2

I'll bet the "insurance company" did not write to you with You must replace your service panel because it is dangerous. More likely, that message was delivered orally. The actuaries would love for you to reduce their risk at your expense. If your policy or another written document from the insurance company or your state insurance commission says anything ...


2

I'd have to say no way. There were never any recalls on FPE panels or breakers, and regardless of their reputation it is not mandatory to have them replaced. You can always try to put a claim in saying the panel was damaged or something, but I don't think you're going to get anyone to pay for this for you. Besides, you are bordering on insurance fraud with ...


2

I am not sure I understand the intent of your question. The neutral wire is not metered. It just passes through the meter box. Old electric meters don't have a connection to it at all. Electric meters monitor both hot legs and add up the kilowatt hours based on current flow through those. photo source. The only remarkable thing I see in your photo is ...


2

Before you terminate and dead end the red wire in the box there a couple of things to consider. Since there are obviously two hots providing power to a split outlet (i.e. tab removed) it does NOT necessarily mean that half the outlet is switched. It could just be that two separate circuits supply power from two circuit breakers. The red wire may come from ...


2

If the bond between top and bottom is broken on the neutral side as well, switch the neutral wires as well as the hot wires. If it's not broken then switching only the hot wires is adequate. When switching off the circuit breaker(s) beware of the possibility (not common but possible) that the top and bottom are on different breakers.


1

The answer is it depends on the applaince. As long as the appliance does not expressly forbid using it on a 30A circuit you should be fine. You'll be able to change the plug and put on a 14-30P plug, just ignore the silver terminal (neutral).


1

Generally, an appliance wired with a 6-20P plug calls for maximum 20A over current protection. The reason why different plugs exist and adapters do not. You need a 20A breaker if you install a 6-20R receptacle. The neutral would be caped at the outlet. NEMA 6 (3 prong) is for appliances that don't need 120v for secondary devices. NEC article 406.7: ...


1

NO. You CANNOT extend this kitchen receptacle circuit to feed lighting. Both Canada (I believe) and the US have restrictions on this. You must find a different source to feed this lighting load. If you are removing it altogether then I would say it is probably OK, but WHY are you removing it? There is a very real chance you are creating a different violation ...


1

The third insulated conductor is only called a "traveler" in the context of a three way switch (when two light switches control the same lights). In this context, the third conductor is just another hot. Usually, when two hots are connected to an outlet like that, the break-away tab is removed, and one outlet is always on while the other is switched. (the ...


1

Remember that power runs from source, thru meter, to breaker box. That isn't power to meter, it's power FROM meter (two phases, red and black). It makes perfect sense to me that neutral too would be drawn from the main box thru the meter box to the apartment box. I don't see anything questionable here.


1

As far as I recall, the main differences are using appropriate metal screws to attach (standard) boxes, and using bushings (should be either provided with framing or easily available from the framing supplier or an electrical supplier) to protect wires passing through the framing. This guide from "steelframing.org" might be a helpful read.


1

The YELLOW or Y terminal at the furncae/ air handler is a dummy terminal for convenience, it is not required to be used, you could send Yellow directly to the AC unit out doors. Common will be used since the Common leg of power comes from the transformer which is in the furnace. The Yellow going to common likely if you trace it back it in fact is ...


1

It's not the size of the kitchen - it's the fact that it's a kitchen. Run the coffeemaker, toaster and microwave, perhaps the waffle iron, fire up the mixer to beat the waffle batter... Even with limited counter space I'd consider 2-3 receptacles a bit under-populated for a kitchen these days. Consider using a larger box and putting a pair at each location, ...


1

Looking at the actual code... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits 210.11 Branch Circuits Required. (C) Dwelling Units. (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere ...


1

It certainly seems like you have a ground fault somewhere. Is it possible there is water damage anywhere inside the garage? Since you've already replaced the GFCI, I think it's safe to assume it's working properly and is tripping as it's designed to. That means somewhere current from the hot or neutral wires is leaking to the ground wire or somewhere else. ...


1

Start by turning off the power at the breaker, and verifying it's off with a non-contact voltage tester. Connect all the bare or green grounding conductors together. Connect the white wire from the ceiling to the white wire on the input side of the remote receiver module and the white wire in the fan. Connect the black wire from the ceiling to the black ...


1

I'm no code expert but as I understand it, yes if you use fire caulk as per exception #2 in 713.3.1 and you are going to surface mount the switch on the drywall in the garage. 713.3 Fire-resistance-rated walls. Penetrations into or through fire walls, fire barriers, smoke barrier walls and fire partitions shall comply with Sections 713.3.1 through 713.3.3. ...



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