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6

No. The 2011 version of the National Electrical Code made this very clear. National Electrical Code 2011 Chapter 7 Special Conditions Article 760 Fire Alarm Systems 760.41 NPLFA Circuit Power Source Requirements (B) Branch Circuit. The branch circuit supplying the fire alarm equipment(s) shall supply no other loads. The location ...


6

In this case, you would simply not hook up the neutral wire. Instead you can just put a wirenut on it and tuck it neatly into the electrical box. Typically 240V appliances require the neutral wire so that they can run the electronics at 120v or provide a plug on the appliance. In this case, these devices are hooked up to one leg of the hot and the ...


4

There doesn't appear to be a grounded (neutral) conductor in the box. Looks like it's a simple switch loop, that somebody tried installing a combination receptacle on. It looks like the black wire is an ungrounded (hot) conductor, and the white wire is a switched ungrounded (hot) conductor. There's no way to add a receptacle here, unless you pull a ...


4

If there's no main breaker, then there is probably another breaker box somewhere, possibly in the same enclosure as the meter. Also, it's possible that the panel you are looking at does not have a main breaker at the top; it could be one of the breakers mixed in with the branch circuit breakers. If you can, post a picture of your breaker panel with the ...


3

I'll have to disagree with Tester101 here. A smoke detector, at least in my area, is NOT considered a "fire alarm", nor is it even implied in the name. It is extremely common to have smokes and CO detectors on a lighting circuit so they cannot be easily or conveniently turned off. IMO powering a receptacle for a router is fine since the router is a ...


3

The conductors and the insulation inside the jacket are almost certainly perfectly okay. The only worrisome thing that comes to mind is that the ground wires in those old NM cables, when they had ground wires, were generally undersized relative to the primary conductors. The electrical code requires that you bring anything you touch during a remodel up to ...


3

You want to rewire just because of a lack of ground? Don't. It's too expensive. Just replace the outlets with GFCI's (AKA RCD), they come with a sticker that says "No Equipment Ground", put that on there. Make sure you trace the wires so you don't have two GFCI's in a chain. You can replace the fuse box in one day with circuit breakers. I did it once ...


3

Rewiring a house takes about a week, give or take, if the electricians have free reign. If they have to tiptoe around the occupants it could take a lot longer. The best way to find out is to have a few electricians do a walk-through and give you a quote. The way I've seen upgrading a house's electrical service with minimal disruption is to add a new breaker ...


3

Yes, look carefully at a GFI (or equivalently GFCI) outlet: You can see the terminals at the top are labeled Line which means, upstream power. The pair of terminals at the bottom are labeled Load, which means this is where to connect outlets downstream which are protected by this GFI. Be careful not to bridge the line terminals to the load terminals! A ...


3

The green is the ground wire. If the work box is metal then the box itself should have a grounding screw and you should connect the green to that. Otherwise you don't need to do anything with the green wire.


3

It is NOT okay to have a 20A circuit breaker on a circuit that has any 14 gauge wire. If there's any #14 wire anywhere downstream, you must use a 15A breaker to protect that wire. It's about fire prevention. #14 wire is rated for 15A. Sure, it will carry more, but the N.E.C. ampacity ratings take into account the resistance of the wire insulation to heat ...


3

Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


3

If there's no permanent ladder or stairs leading to the attic, you may be able to simply lay the cable across the rafters. "Where this space is not accessible by permanent stairs or ladders, protection shall only be required within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the nearest edge of the scuttle hole or attic entrance.". National Electrical Code Chapter 3 ...


2

One of the first things they taught us was to "Always switch the hot". On 240 volt, you switch both hots. With line voltages, they always make the hot parts as small and inaccessible as possible. That is why the hot tab inside a lamp socket is down in the bottom, where it's hard to touch. The same goes for the smaller hot hole in an outlet vs the larger ...


2

It all depends on several things. What size is the circuit? What else is one it? What do the manufacturer's instructions say? Typically you'd only need a dedicated circuit for something like this if it is big enough to warrant it, or if the mfg requires it. When I say big enough I mean 50% of the circuit size since you are combining a fixed in place ...


2

Tester is spot on about the lack of a neutral conductor, all you have is a hot and switched, the outlet doesn't have the necessary wiring. You'll need to run another line with a neutral. If that line also contains another hot then you can break off the tab between the two hot screws and wire the bottom with the new hot/neutral. If that hot comes from a ...


2

If the device was wired using French conventions, the ground is yellow, blue is the neutral wire, and brown is the live wire (ref). That said, the ground should be apparent by inspection. Look at where the yellow (or green and yellow) wire goes. It surely is attached directly to metal on the chandelier. As for the other two wires, it doesn't matter ...


2

There should be a breaker or fuse somewhere, even if there is no single main. There HAS to be a way to shut it off. Thing is, yes, there is a way to hack a job like this so bad that there is no breaker. If not then someone catastrophically messed up. Are you 100% sure there is not another panel or disconnect somewhere?


2

No, it is not safe. I would turn off power to that circuit at the distribution panel, test the wire with a suitable voltage detecter/meter and insulate the end of the wire until the whole repair can be completed. If you can't do this and the house is occupied, I would treat it as a serious life-threatening hazard. I would prevent all access to that room, ...


2

My house had a fair bit of that wiring. It was apparently available both with and without ground but the ungrounded type is all I have ever seen. If you arent doing any work on it its probably fine to just leave it alone. If you start doing significant rewiring, adding outlets, or any of the cloth is damaged, its probably time to run new cable back to ...


2

Accessible or not While you might call this area inaccessible because it's small, dark, and difficult to enter. In this case, the codes definition of accessible is whether or not there's permanent stairs or a ladder. Cable run across the top of joists If the attic is accessible by permanent stairs or ladder, any cable running across the top of joists ...


2

There are two considerations for this. Attics without permanent access stairs/ladder. You must protect cables located within 6' of the attic access hole. Attics with permanent access stairs/ladder. You must protect all cables running perpendicular and atop the joists. Ultimately, for type NM (Romex), this is directly referenced in the 2011 NEC ...


2

Yes, you can loop around a box provided you staple like you describe. I'd suggest having the cable not touch the box since someday the box may have to be removed and keeping the cable away from the box will prevent it getting damaged.


2

Yes, that would be fine per 2011 NEC Article 334 Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Types NM (Romex), NMC, and NMS. (emphasis mine) 334.30 Securing and Supporting Non-metallic sheathed cable shall be supported and secured by staples, cable ties, straps, hangers, or similar fittings designed and installed so as not to damage the cable, at intervals not ...


2

Without knowing exactly what you've got going on, it's impossible to say for sure what you have to do. It's totally possible that there are no "neutrals" in the box at all, depending on when the house was wired (and by whom). Here's what the schematic should look like... Basically, any wire that comes "after" a load, and creates a low resistance path ...


2

You've asked several questions here. Checking if it's 24V AC First of all, by far the vast majority of furnaces use 24VAC for control wiring. However, it's always better to be sure rather than make assumptions, so there are several ways to do this: Look at the spec sheet or manual for your model Look for labels on the control board, probably where the ...


2

When it comes to extensions used for welding and high current draw, I would not factor the cord size based on amp draw alone. Essentially the biggest problem you will face is heat generated within the cord. This is increased if you keep your cord rolled up whilst using it (the electromagnetic effect leading to an induction field). What I am saying is that ...


2

First off. The only way to provide proper "grounding", is to install a grounding conductor from the panel to each outlet. Providing AFCI and GFCI protection to the circuits is helpful, but these devices will not provide "grounding". If you switch from 2-prong receptacles to 3-prong on these circuits, you should not connect anything to the grounding screw ...


2

In most modern fixtures that have multiple lamps, the wires are preconfigured going into the hood so that there is only one black (hot), one white (neutral) and one green or bare (ground) wire coming from the fixture to be attached to the wires in the box. If there are separate wires for the three lamps, all three black wires should be twisted together and ...


1

It's tapped like that because that's the way it was supposed to be done when that work was done. Back in those days (<2011) if you had a single 2-wire feed (romex) to and fro a switch box. The white wire would, according to more recent codes prior to NEC 2011, and possibly then too but not followed, have been taped a solid color other than green to notify ...



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