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6

No it is not safe. A 15 ampere rated receptacle should not be installed on a circuit protected by a 30 ampere breaker. You should not be plugging devices that draw more than 15 amperes, into a 15 ampere rated receptacle. The receptacle in your photo is a 20 ampere receptacle, so you shouldn't have a problem plugging in a 20 ampere device. They make ...


5

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


3

I'm going to leave minimal for someone else and answer smart.... Put the lights on their own 15A breaker. Put receptacles on a couple of 20 amp breakers. If you MUST share (or think you must) put half the lights and some receptacles on one circuit (probably 15 amp unless you really want to run 12 gauge to lights) and half the lights and some other ...


3

It can be and frequently is replaced piecemeal, but I'd certainly be in favor of wholesale replacement if it were my house. If we accept "1880s-1930s" as the range of its general use (wikipedia, not any particularly great research effort) it's 80-130 years old. And any impact it's having on your insurance rates won't end until it's all gone. Plus, you ...


3

Yes, you can use 10 AWG copper conductors with a 20 ampere breaker. The smallest size conductors you could use with a 20 ampere breaker, are 12 AWG copper conductors. There's no problem using larger conductors, other than cost to you, and difficulties associated with working with thicker conductors.


3

To get reliable USB over more than about 15 feet you'll have to use active extenders. I see a 31 foot active USB extension cable online for $15 right now. Good luck pulling the fat end through your walls, though. And it's only USB 2.0. What are you going to do when all your old in-wall USB cables are obsolete and none of your new devices want to work with ...


3

I can't speak to code directly, but generally things like pumps are placed on non-switched circuits to prevent someone from accidentally turning off the pump and then flooding the house. Imagine a scenario where someone is trying to figure out what the switch does because they can't/won't follow the cable. They flip the switch a few times and nothing ...


3

From your diagram it looks like the grounded (neutral) conductor connected to the light (that trips the GFCI), does not come from the GFCI device. It looks like the grounded (neutral) wire is coming from the feeder to the circuit, instead. Because of this, you'll have current flow through the GFCI device on the ungrounded (hot) conductor that does not ...


2

A simple on/off switch is best for a fan. This is a 'single-pole' switch. For a rocker style, something like this would work http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-Decora-15-Amp-Single-Pole-AC-Quiet-Switch-White-R72-05601-2WS/100058788 The switch will most likely be rated for 15 amps. This is fine, the switch must be the same as or more than the fan.


2

You can run type NM cable in conduit, as long as the conduit is sized appropriately, and is not in a wet or damp location. If you remove the sheath from the conductors inside NM cable, you cannot use the conductors for anything (anything electrical anyway). Type NM cable is rated, listed, and labeled as a cable assembly. The conductors inside are not ...


2

First off, you do not need a separate tail to the box itself. Typically we'll wrap one of the grounds around the box grounding screw then on to the splice. Personally, I use ground crimps. I twist all the grounds at the point I want the crimp, then I leave tails for the number of devices in the box, and cut the rest off right at the crimp spot, then put on ...


2

If you search the IDEAL Connector UL Listed Wire Combinations (pdf) document for "6 #12", you'll find they offer a few twist-on wire connectors that can handle six 12 AWG conductors. Like the Wing-Nut 454 Wire Connector If you're only working with grounding conductors, IDEAL also has Splice Cap Crimp Connectors that can handle six 12 AWG conductors. ...


2

Sealed in this case is weatherproof, save your sanity and use something like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Taymac-1-Gang-Horizontal-or-Vertical-Mount-Weatherproof-While-in-Use-Cover-Kit-MKG410C/202284520?N=5yc1vZca29 But feel free to recess it into your house.


2

If the old fixture worked, Then you should be good if all is connected properly. When you say you "wrapped" the new wires onto the wire in the ceiling, I take it you mean just that, and perhaps taped them up (given the first picture) - I'm guessing they came untaped and shorted out when you put the fixture in place. Cut and strip the wires in the ceiling, ...


2

There's no problem installing the fan without a switch. In many cases folks replace a switched ceiling light fixture with a fan, so the fan uses the switch that used to control the light. In other cases the ceiling is too high, so controlling the fan via the pull chain is inconvenient. If you install the fan without a switch, you could always add a ...


2

Of the options you are considering, I'd think option 2 makes more sense, and 4-5 feet of conduit - in most cases the conduit will just be continuous from the junction box right through the wall, no particular fuss "as it enters the house" - Come down the wall, put on an LB, drill a hole in the wall, insert conduit, connect to junction box, connect to LB; ...


2

I'd have to suspect that you are perhaps not always getting the part where the wire actually ends up between the plates right - to Quote @shirlocks answer "Just be sure to tip the device so the grab plates open before inserting the wires." If the wires are in the right place and the screws are tight THIS flavor of back wiring is VERY secure (as distinct from ...


2

I'm a HUGE fan of Wago's "Wall-Nuts" ... They exceed all NEC pull-out tests and they're much more secure than the crappy wire nuts everyone has been using since plastic was invented. And they come in up to 8-port. There are 6-port versions as well just not pictured.


2

This can be done using a multi-way fan/light controller system such as the Lutron Maestro series. You (or your electrician) will need a MA-LFQM package, which includes the master wall module and the canopy module, and two MA-ALFQ35 accessory controls, as well as normal wiring supplies (two and three conductor cable of the appropriate gauge, wire ...


2

I don't know your "switch/outlet" combination in detail, but I'd guess there might be a connection by default (ie, the switch is tied to the outlet unless you break a tab) that's getting upset by the switch being fed from the line side and the outlet being fed from the load side of the GFCI. In any case, the disposal probably ought to be connected to the ...


2

Does this all sound right and I should just not worry about it? If it is causing you concern, you could pay another electrician for a second opinion. I wouldn't bother but you may feel it worthwhile. do I need to start tearing down walls to figure out where the cut wire came from? If you must know where the wire leads to, that might eventually be ...


1

You may not be able to find a timer that's designed to directly switch that much, but you can find a timer that switches a lot less, and use it to switch the coil of a relay that can switch whatever load you require. Relay coils take very little power to switch, and relay contacts can be had as large as you could possible need, or larger. However, if you ...


1

No. The device you have requires a grounded (neutral) conductor to be connected to function. There's no other way to hook it up. I believe Honeywell offers timers that don't require a grounded (neutral) connection. You might want to purchase one of those instead.


1

You need more than a "transformer" - you require a DC power supply for most bare LEDs. A transformer is only part of such a supply. If you are running the LEDs in parallel, resistors are essential - otherwise one unit will end up with "more of the current" and die from it. LEDs are very sensitive to and require precise control of current - the voltage can ...


1

Unless the specific device requires it, there's no requirement to use the back wire terminals. It's simply a personal preference to do it that way. If you're having trouble using the back wire terminals, it's probably safer for you to not use them (unless of course the device requires it). You'll also want to check the markings on the device, and read ...


1

Sure, within limits - it may depend where the GFCI is and where in the world you are - if the prevailing electrical code requires a circuit dedicated to one room, and you extend it beyond that room, you would be violating code. Other than THAT, yes, it's certainly possible - connect from the LOAD terminals on the GFCI to the first outlet, from the first ...


1

In general, yes. GFCI outlets have LINE and LOAD terminals. You can connect several more outlets on the LOAD terminals, and they will also be protected from ground faults. You can also add a switch, though bear in mind that highly inductive loads (like a large motor) can cause nuisance tripping of the GFCI.


1

The trade answer is a toner and probe, it is also the easiest. An amazon search for ' telephone tracer ' will show a range of products I am talking about. A toner is the tool that the phone company supplies to their employees that need to find a specific pair of wires in a cable, or inside a wall. Other places use them too. The tool is art meets science ...


1

Some confusion in the comments - this is USB in every room. It sounds like you may want a Pi in every room The System I show works like this: [USB 3.0] [USB 3.0] [USB3.0] | | / Ethernet - Ethernet - Ethernet - [USB 3.0] | | [USB 3.0] [USB 3.0] USB 3.0 in 6 places If you only want USB 2.0, the adapters are only $8 If ...


1

TL;DR: your subpanels are seriously screwed up. Fixing it will require running wires, because the last installer was likely an idiot We start this journey in NEC 215.6: 215.6 Feeder Equipment Grounding Conductor. Where a feeder supplies branch circuits in which equipment grounding conductors are required, the feeder shall include or provide an ...



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