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One possible solution would be to get a clear plexiglass panel, cut it to size and seal it on the window. You can either build a "dam" blocking the lower half of the window, or seal the whole surface and make it waterproof. Of course, air flow in this case will be completely blocked, which may be a problem (and in some jurisdictions, illegal - where I live ...


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Short term solution: use solid concrete blocks and polyurethane caulk (like you have between the sidewalk and house.) to build a dam in front of the window. Blocks ar available in various sizes and you could use some 8" ones on edge to build an 8" dam if you think it needs to be that tall. Long term solution: remove part of the sidewalk and install a drain ...


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Gutters would help a lot. I thought I saw water on the inside on the video. At the bottom of the window there should be 2 or more small weep slots / holes these allow the water that gets in the tray to drain out. I believe these are full of debris and probably plugged. If you open the window look outside at the bottom of the frame you should spot the weep ...


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There are many films available to obscure glass -- frosted, patterned, etc. They are self adhering and can be fairly easily removed. They come in a variety of sizes and can be cut to size. Look for them in big box stores or window treatment stores. Images and links are examples only, not an endorsement of goods or sources


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There are a lot of options you could consider depending on your budget and opinion on "cheap". There are acoustic dampening windows you could look into if you have a higher budget and don't mind replacing your window. If you're sure that the main source of noise penetration is through the window, which is to be expected, then this might be the best / most ...


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I'm Mike by the way, relax... it's going to be an improvement whatever steps you decide to take. I'm sure after reviewing all the opinions on how one might combat a situated vintage home, you'll make the right choice. I've done a lot of reconstruction/remodeling of historic houses in the nation's oldest city "St.Augustine" and first thing we look for are ...


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It's hard to tell exactly what the problem is, but it certainly doesn't sound right. It may be that you have a mulled window (here's a video about mulled windows), and perhaps the flanges were not nailed in or the nails missed the (rough) sill or header. I think that the place to start would be to remove the siding under (and around) the window to get a ...


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Nothing to do with building codes, unless you are hanging an addition to your house out the window. Your own (single-family) home on your own lot (piece of land) - depends what you have (or don't) for a home-owner's association, or if your house is subject to some sort of restrictive covenant such as a historic preservation district. A home that is part of ...


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With the "cable system", there are metal rods in the frame between windows that go the full height of the window and are tied into the frame. You connect a cable to an eye at the top of the window and run it back at an angle to the wall the window is installed in, above the window. The other end of the cable is fastened to a bolt that is securely fastened to ...


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Silicone is soluble in vinegar. Try applying some vinegar to the remaining residue with a sponge, waiting 30 minutes or so, then trying to rub it off (perhaps with a stiff brush).


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Technically you're adding pin studs or trimmers under the header, and not kings, but yes. Insert the new trimmers before anything else and stand them vertical, then add the inner trimmers (assuming you want doubled studs for strength and trim backing). Move the trimmer pairs into position and toenail them to the header using either framing nails or ...



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