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What could I do to reduce the amount of heat in the living room on sunny days without obstructing the view to the outside permanently? What I find works well are traditional Venetian-blinds with silver-coloured metal horizontal slats. Even though these are inside the window, they are still remarkably effective at reflecting sunlight out the window and ...


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So I eventually figured it out, after some trial and error. Many thanks to Jimmy Fix-It, for giving me the correct term of flush-bolt :) My actual problem I realised that the door itself had become slightly out of align, probably because people kept pushing the door and so after a while the top edge of the door, didn't line up with the flushing on the ...


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I have had good luck using this stuff, all over the parting beads and sides of frame and sash: Of course, removing old layers of paint, repairing/replacing the sash springs/balances/weights, and a general tune up along with the stick lube greatly reduces opening and closing effort.


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The problem isn't sash windows. The problem is poorly maintained sash windows, by landlords who don't care and/or don't have adequate maintenance budgets due to rent control. The most common problem moving them up and down is tram. The track becomes uneven from a combination of wear in some places, and paint buildup in other places along the track. As ...


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The wooden framed double hung sash design dates from a time when no elderly person was ever left alone long enough to open or close a window. Families were large and any oldster who wanted a window operated would simply whack the nearest youngster with a cane and croak out the appropriate orders. Today the demographic age curve is quite different and there ...


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That is called a manual flush bolt. The piece that protrudes through the top and bottom of the door is called the bolt head. Both the bolt head (which is threaded to an actuating rod), and the actuating rod (which is threaded to the lever actuator) are designed to be adjusted by threading them in or out. The bolt head is commonly keyed, i.e. it is not round ...


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I used my Dremal with a 3/16" round diamond coated bit (Harbor Freight) and ground in a hole at the bottom left and upper right INSIDE pane. Grind at an angle till you break through. Then take a triangle bit and in a rotary motion open the hole to no more than 1/4". Be careful to not let the bits get jammed in the glass (Crack!). I then used a hair dryer ...


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Do a search for shutter caps. These are metal caps that go over the tops of shutters. They will help with the top, but not likely the splash-back from the ground. If you can find a roofer or a siding contractor with a sheet metal brake (and is willing to deal with a small project) you could easily bend a strip of metal, perhaps 3 or 4 inches wide, to ...


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There are domed window well covers for these applications. A search of window well covers should give you leads for the rights size and material. Note that egress windows must be easily exited. If this is an egress window, check your local code to see if a cover is allowed and how removable it must be. Images and links are illustrative only, not an ...


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I had mold in the basement bathroom. We installed a window which can be opened, a small humidifier, and cleaned mold with bleach. Advice for bleach, I emptied window cleaning spray container and sprayed bleach rather than using a cloth or something else. Works like magic. No more mold.


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White silicon may work to plug the holes but if you use it make sure to get the surface finish the way you want it before the stuff dries. It is not a material that will sand very well after the fact. You may also want to try a bathroom tub and sink sealer product. These products bridge gaps fairly well and dry staying a nice white color. The product that I ...


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One possible solution would be to get a clear plexiglass panel, cut it to size and seal it on the window. You can either build a "dam" blocking the lower half of the window, or seal the whole surface and make it waterproof. Of course, air flow in this case will be completely blocked, which may be a problem (and in some jurisdictions, illegal - where I live ...


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Short term solution: use solid concrete blocks and polyurethane caulk (like you have between the sidewalk and house.) to build a dam in front of the window. Blocks ar available in various sizes and you could use some 8" ones on edge to build an 8" dam if you think it needs to be that tall. Long term solution: remove part of the sidewalk and install a drain ...


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Gutters would help a lot. I thought I saw water on the inside on the video. At the bottom of the window there should be 2 or more small weep slots / holes these allow the water that gets in the tray to drain out. I believe these are full of debris and probably plugged. If you open the window look outside at the bottom of the frame you should spot the weep ...


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There are many films available to obscure glass -- frosted, patterned, etc. They are self adhering and can be fairly easily removed. They come in a variety of sizes and can be cut to size. Look for them in big box stores or window treatment stores. Images and links are examples only, not an endorsement of goods or sources



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