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1

Window standard depth is 4 9/16". The rule with windows and doors is that you block them out to fit the window/door not the other way around. (Every time I see somebody trying to shave a door I chuckle.) What you did before is correct. The skill is learning how to trim the window as efficiently and securely as possible.


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The sanest thing is to order new construction flanged windows that are a bit smaller than the rough opening. Then you integrate the flange with the WRB that you're installing over the new sheathing (right?) and bob's your uncle. On the inside, you can cover up the lack of square-ness with new drywall or wood window boxes, shimmed to be square with the ...


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If you're building custom frames, take a scrap piece of the frame, cut it to the inside width of your frame, use it as a temporary support... like a cross bar... if you do not have extra material, or you're re-screening old frames, maybe a thin piece of wood will work for your temporary cross bar? Also, I like to use a T-square, it helps keep the frame ...


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Dish soap and a j-cloth worked well to remove egg that was 2 days old from vinyl siding.


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One benefit of tilt and turn windows, as well as casement windows that are more common in the US, is that they provide a more airtight seal than sash windows (single-hung, double-hung, sliders). This reduces heating and cooling energy use of the building. The better airtightness also means the windows are less drafty and thus more comfortable.


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I think this probably has more to do with regional building habits than any systematic optimal decision. I agree, what you call "tilt and turn" windows seem to be more common in Europe. In the US (and elsewhere?) a similar style is a "casement" window, although it's not as functional (doesn't open as far and doesn't offer multiple ways of opening). I have ...


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For two curtains not three, I think metal is easier (three curtains tends to block more light in day time, and probably harder to avoid gaps at night). Bay windows vary a bit, and I've seen two systems that seem fairly flexible to different designs and sizes of window: Metal track that you bend over your knee to match the angle on your window (you can ...


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I use Coke in a spray bottle. It works surprisingly well. Just make sure you soak the hell out of it.


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I've now fitted the blind, and both the top piece and the side rails needed to be removed. the top part was replaced by the blind cartridge, which fits flush to the frame the side rails, while narrow enough to allow the new rails to be fitted, fouled the inside edge of the blind cartridge. In the end all three parts were easy to remove as they had been ...


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That's just how it goes. They'd have to re-frame it at this point, with that specifically in mind (and still there'd have to be a piece of trim covering some of the window, to hold it in place). The window sill/opening could be bigger, but the view 'size' won't change. In a masonry wall, the framing didn't allow for it (carpenter's fault). In a stud ...


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I have a bit of a botched solution for this that I use in one of our bedrooms. The curtain has a blackout lining but sits about 8cm away from the wall. Light bounces off the lining, onto the wall and into the room. I made a strip of black plastic by taping together pieces, the strip is about 5 metres long. I drape the strip over the curtain rail brackets ...



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