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-3

So I was looking for the answer to this question also. I found a college paper that claims 13% increase in insulation. Here's the link if anyone's interested. http://pages.uoregon.edu/hof/W10HOF/22FilmPaper.pdf


1

I used z-clips also known as french cleats. Perfect. They distribute the load across the sill of the window, including to the studs on both sides. Seems to be holding fine.


1

You almost certainly can't use New Construction windows without at least removing some siding. This type of window is intended to be installed before the siding is on, so you can integrate its built-in flange with the wall's water-resistive barrier (tar paper or Tyvek housewrap, usually) using tape and good lapping, all of which requires several inches of ...


0

A proven way to do blackout without a curtain rod is to use black fabric cut to the window size. Put up Velcro dots on the window frame, placed strategically to match Velcro on the fabric. You can actually make fabric to look like Roman shades. Looks great, no screws or hardware and easy to wash. Remember to use matching Velcro dots to achieve the look of ...


0

If you look at the lower picture, you'll see that the missing tab served to hold the plug in its recessed (locked) position. When rotated 90 degrees it lined up with the cut-outs, letting the spring (lost, I presume?) push it out to the unlocked position. It may also have helped retain the plug in the lock. More commonly, that's actually done by a reserved ...


0

Hm. Possible answer to my own question, synthesizing what others have said: Another option would be to frame in and close off the bottom half of the window (improving privacy and reducing splash), and replace the top half with a swinging/tilting window. Largest complication would be properly closing the outside of the house; I presume I could just install ...


1

If it's an old house, it may have originally been a claw-foot tub with a full surround curtain. And the window was the ventilation. If you want to keep the window (as it sounds like you don't want to seal it off), one option would be to replace it with a vinyl window with vinyl trim. Make sure the vinyl trim is glued and sealed. That would get rid of the ...


0

I was about to put a comment, but it may be too long, so I go for an answer (sorry, if it's not so good...). Aestethical solution. As the curtain is already in place, i's quite awful-looking (imho, of course). If my intention would be to leave window in place (cuz I like the idea of some fresh air or/and more light during daytime) and replace curtain with ...


0

A picture would be nice but lets assume it's neither plumb, nor square. A quick look at that video shows a window that's not plumb but is square. He accounts for this by ripping off some of the height of a 2x6, at the appropriate angle so that it will be flush with the face of the wall and the window. It'd have to be ripped again, so that the width ends up ...


1

We are doing mostly option 3 right now in our house, but in our case, we are pulling the trim down to strip the paint on the trim, and clean up the walls. (100 years of paint, varnish and some neglect). It's not terrible to pull the trim, and I think it will make the rest of the job so much easier. Just be cautious with the window apron (underneath the ...


5

One of the main purposes of moldings, such as the trim around doors and windows (called casings), is to act as a barrier and seal to wind and water intrusion. Moldings on wall between vertical boards, called battens served a similar purpose. The decorative element was an extra benefit (unless you are an extreme modernist/minimalist who wants totally flat ...


2

If you were in a really dry region, it might be overkill, but window wells and covers also help protect basement windows from physical damage (stuff the mower throws, ornery pets, etc). That said, two inches isn't terribly much, and installing them would probably be prudent if you planned to raise the grade around the window with flower beds or something. ...


0

Your window well should already have a drain that ties into the drain tiles around your foundation. This is likely already tied into your sump. Often over time the drains get clogged up and filled with debris. The solution is to dig out the window well and unclog the drain. You should have about a foot of crushed gravel that stops 6" below the window level ...


0

You're only talking about 15 square feet of surface area. I would just use some thick single-pane low-e glass and be done with it. Use the time and money to improve your house's energy efficiency in some more cost effective way, like adding some caulk somewhere or some better weather stripping around a couple doors.


0

Kind of tangential here but file this away as another approach: I built a skylight 40 years ago out of acrylic sheets ("Plexiglass") using acrylic solvent to bond the edges of the double-paned center portion. It's still sealed after all these years. I didn't take all the precautions that were possible - leak testing and using adhesive where leaks existed; ...


0

It's a single hung window. I don't know the brand. It appears that to remove the sash that the channel (the channel that contains the copper colored spring in the last picture) must be retractable (probably spring loaded). So I'd push the channel back into the slot it's in. If I'm guessing correctly, when you apply pressure the channel will retract away ...


1

Option 1 - tapcon screws (or similar) into the solid parts of the block. Option 2 - stuff some wire mesh a few inches down the holes. Mix a very stiff mortar/concrete, place on top of the mesh, make a lovely smooth flat surface, and drop in some anchor bolts (probably overkill for a windowframe) or just screw the board in with tapcons or the like but ...



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