Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Depending on the size, weight would be my only structural concern. A large window well filled only with concrete is going to weigh a ton. That could potentially put unwanted pressure on the foundation. The windows should be blocked/bricked in, add some below grade sealer/barrier (whatever the foundation of the building is made of), the hole filled with ...


3

Specifically (without getting into product recommendations), look for "static cling film" as opposed to an adhesive product. You can get both mirrored and "stained glass" versions - they apply with water and a squeegee, and peel off again without a fight or residue. "Privacy film" is another search term; or "window privacy film." The stained glass or ...


0

They don't actually look that bad (at least to me from that picture) - you should be able to just sand them down, re-stain if desired, and then polyurethane / seal them again.


0

Creating glass to non-glass seals is a non-trivial problem. The problem scales as the window gets bigger. Making a 6" x 6" seal is pretty easy. Making a 6' x 6' is hard. Normal steel flexes more than you would suspect. You can't just glue two panes together without any support because they will flex and leak. To make 8.5" x 11" panes is not too hard as long ...


0

If you use Butyl Rubber around perimeter except a small part and use a heat lamp to heat interior section, then seal the short part, it will be like canning tomatoes. When it cools, a vacuum will be formed !


0

Inside of the walls, the window starts with just a few boards called a "Header" and a "Footer". You could easily have somebody move, resize or remake them to fit almost any window size. If I was in that situation, I'd remove the drywall around the window, get a slightly bigger window, have somebody remove, replace or re-position the header and footer, ...


-1

Why would you want to do this? Home automation technology is a terrible idea IMHO. The stuff is expensive, there are no standards to make things work together, and it will all break in a few years and have to be replaced. Having been in many houses with this kind of equipment in them, I cannot honestly say any of them really added value to the house, made ...


0

Why don't you consider a free-standing TV stand, similar to this? This would easily handle a large LED TV up to at least 50", is easy to move and doesn't require covering your window. Covering the entire window with plywood then mounting an LED TV on it, and having it look good, will take some doing. I would think that you'd want to screw 3/4" plywood ...


0

I would strongly advise against trying to make an ad hoc mounting for a TV. Its a lot harder than you might think. Use a production mounting arm of some type. A typical example shown below: If you screw it into the window frame it will probably hold.


0

If there is a space behind the plaster board and the brick wall it is most likely that there have been wooden strips mounted to the brick and then the plaster board has been in turn mounted to those wood strips. I would expect you to find a strip vertical right next to the window, one on each side of the corner in from the window and then some under the ...


2

I am a graveyard shift worker. I found the best solution is a cheap sleep mask you can get at Walgreens. Total blackout for you leaves light when you want it. Not being sarcastic, just this is what I found over years trying to sleep during the day.



Top 50 recent answers are included