New answers tagged

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A wooden dowel sawed off to the right length to prop the window open is the traditional answer. You can keep the dowel on the sill when you're not using it.


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Window screens usually go on the inside of jalousie windows because (most) jalousie windows open outward (at least partly). If you want to install a screen on the outside then you would (probably) need to build a frame around the window, with enough depth so that the window will not touch the outside screen. Also, you will probably need to weather-proof an ...


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The easy, but ugly solution is to cut a sheet of plywood that will fill the entire opening, and cut a hole in that to attach the AC exaust hose. Or cut the plywood to fit in beside the exaust hose, whichever is easier. Then insulate and seal the crap out of it with foam boards and metal tape. I would recommend avoiding portable AC if you can get one that ...


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A window hinged at the side is called a casement window. More specifically, that is a slide hinge, manual, sector crank casement window. Different manufacturers may have a different name for the 'slide hinge' style. Its purpose is to allow easy cleaning of the outside of the pane. It's 'manual' because you turn the crank by hand. Some industrial ...


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Lots of over-thinking for your solution. Glass: Talk to your local window retailer about installing a shatter-resistant film on the glass. 3M and BurglarGARD films can prevent an intruder from breaking out the glass easily. Proper installation is a must. It's not as easy as adding window tint film. And an FYI: modern tempered glass for residential windows ...


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This is how it ended up. Hope it speaks for itself and thanks to everyone for their input.


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Adding an update to Peter Mounce's answer from: https://zebbakes.com/2011/06/21/how-to-uninstall-a-velux-black-out-blind/ The Mr McDonald method at the end worked for me in a couple of seconds, and doesn't have the crazy screwdriver involvement. The quote is: spoke with a very helpful chap at Velux (UK) and removed the blind quite easily. Method was ...


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It's hard to provide a "straight answer" with the information given. Bearing wall vs. gable wall, rambler vs. two-story. Window position and wall height. There are many factors. I can tell you that triple-member headers are not common except where limited height is available. We built nearly all our exterior headers with doubled 2x10s in a U configuration, ...


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Vented soffit below the window will allow air in, and will reduce the effectiveness of insulation. Other than that, it wouldn't cause a problem, but you're already concerned about the cold near the window. You should focus on how the water gets in, and prevent that from happening in the first place. It should be fairly easy for your contractor to tell ...


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Normal humidity should do no harm to anything that's been properly made. Remember, humanity has lived with poorly sealed houses in humid climates for centuries, and our belongings have adapted to deal with that. Woodworkers, for example, are very aware that wood expands and contracts as it gains and losses moisture, at different rates along and across the ...


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The windows in the top photo are actually doors. They are aluminum, probably a custom extrusion. You will have a VERY heavy window. Your opening mechanism will need to account for that, as well as the structure which supports the hinges. The windows in the lower photo are actually made of steel T-section. Yes, they are welded. The glass is glazed in ...


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Polyurethane caulking works but you will find that sometimes you see that through paint.


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I find that a urethane caulk works wonders in cases like this. It bonds like no other caulk I've used, can be had in a huge variety of custom colors, doesn't shrink much, remains very flexible, and is paintable. I'm most familiar with OSI Quad. Be warned, it's extremely sticky--you won't get it off your clothes, and you'll have to wear it off your skin. It ...


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i have multiple questions, but first, where is this being done and what is your climate like. i think you will have huge sealing, glazing and warpage problems trying to weld that out of steel. even if you get someone who has a harmonic resonator, the thin sections will twist enough to make glass mounting a problem. why not use aluminum. its stiffer ...


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I have similar windows at home (mine are pushing 30 years) and I've been able to replace a broken pane in one window some time back. It was not fun. As I recall, there is a rubber spacer between the panes and glass may be glued to it, and the whole assembly has the exact thickness of the channel in the window sash. If you simply remove one pane without doing ...


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In fact, you can clear these windows up. If its regular glass, two small holes are drilled and a cleaning solution (which need not be toxic) injected. If it is tempered glass, the same procedure is possible if the glass seal can be reached for drilling (this is possible for most windows that can open and close: they'd get drilled from an edge). Check the ...


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I woud not try the "cut out or smash one pane" approach. I might try removing the pane as a unit (yep, you're going to have to dis-assemble wherever it was "built in place" a little) and drilling the seal/separator full of holes to ventilate it - or simply go ahead and replace it. If ventilated, the ventilation should be to the outside air in a heating ...


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I think that the landlord is responsible, but sometimes it's necessary to do things yourself... that depends on your living/renting situation. Household (5%) bleach (dilute 1/2 cup bleach : gallon water) will absolutely work. The black mold is probably Aspergillus niger, which often produces something called aflatoxins, which can cause cancer. But the ...


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That looks pretty bad. Don't use bleach, use a purpose-made mold killer product. I like Mold Armor, myself. Be careful with these products. They're super caustic and you could probably hurt yourself if you drink them or don't have good ventilation.


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All you need is shims and Spray Foam. Shim the window on all four sides Square in the opening. The Sims will hold the window tight, let the spray foam dry and take out the shims and fill the holes with spray foam. No use some round backer rod and place that around all four sides on the exterior and then caulk the window to the concrete with backer rod ...


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Windows should be lubricated with bees wax to work properly or anti-seize lubricant which is messy and ugly. Never heard of window bearings. Is this like muffler bearings? Joke ;)


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I have a similar concern about using the plastic during the summer. This past winter I decided to try the Duck Brand Tape "Cristal Clear Shrink Film" at the beginning of December. The kit was for a 10 window install with 2 rolls of the sticky tape and sold at Walmart for nine dollars & change.; How could I go wrong? So I did it. WOW!! I have to say this ...


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you can drill holes in glass with the right bit for a standard drill. make a 1/4" hole @ the top inside of your window. make a 2nd hole @ the bottom diagonally on the outside. attach a tube to the bottom hole so it will drain the contents of the window into a bucket. now the dangerous part. get hydrofluoric acid @ 1% or less. fill window and let sit for 1 ...


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I have had the same problem with vinyl frame windows. There is nothing you can do except replace the window. With vinyl windows, you can usually replace the entire sash quite easily. Contact the manufacturer or the contractor that did the orignal install. Most manufacturers offer a warranty against fogging for a certain number of years, so be sure to check ...


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No, you cannot support your blinds with two pieces of paper, because that's all there is in drywall to resist the tension force pulling out or at an angle. The contained gypsum is strong to compression, you can stand on it if it's flat on the floor. But if you screw in and then exert force to pull the screw out, with very little force you'll either have the ...


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No. You're limited by what you can do from the outside, and obviously that's not much. Energy efficiency is only slightly reduced in such cases, as airflow into and out of the compartment between panes is minimal, but the aesthetic problem will only get worse. Chances are you can replace just the sash, which might cost about half of what a new window ...


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A photo of the situation would help. But if you are "repairing" the meter itself then the better advice would be that you get the meter replaced instead. There could be some concerns raised with tampering with the meter if its seals are broken. On the other hand if this "window" is a separate thing from the meter then why mess with Lexan if there is a ...


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Take a tape measure and measure the width by putting the tape measure in the deepest channel and measure across to the other end and take off 1/4 inch. Do the same for the height.


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If I understand this correctly, you need a way to connect the flashing to the parging. I would advise studying the way that chimney apron flashing is attached to chimneys. In short, (maybe call a contractor to) cut a 1/2" deep groove (aka kerf or riglet) in the parging to insert the flashing. Use window and door flashing tape (aka double stick) and silcone ...


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At the end of the spiral balance is a small hole... you will need a tool for this... (look on line and buy one ) it has a small hook on it... move your spiral up by hand until it stops... take the tool insert tip into hole and turn the spiral about 10 times... ( clockwise ) ... then using that same tool move the spiral up in to the area that will hold ...



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