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21

Even if the windows were super thick, it wouldn't be strong enough to handle the pressure exerted by a properly positioned ladder. A ladder is supposed to be sloped 25%, like this: With someone standing near the top of the ladder, that means roughly 20% of his weight is directed as lateral force, directly into the wall or window, conveyed by the points ...


16

Don't do it. Put the ladder above the window, then clean by putting your arms through the rungs. Shouldn't the windows have a way to tilt them inward and clean from inside the house? Most every modern window I've seen has a way to do that. You may want to get a ladder stabilizer:


10

Either use a A frame ladder or a squeegee on a pole. I personally wouldn't trust my health on the structural strength of glass.


7

Tubular skylights, a suntube in use and available from Solatube. There's roofing and carpentry involved but no framing needed. They're the only way to have a skylight with an attic above without blowing out your ceiling. Cut 2 holes, flash it to the roof, enjoy.


5

An arch (if engineered correctly) is self supporting. No need for a lintel at all. From the looks of it, that arch is more than adequate to hold the brick above so I'd say that wooden piece is merely a filler--not a structural element.


4

The only logical that comes to my mind is an awning of some sort. If you get a big enough one, most direct light will be lost and you should have the same amount of airflow.


4

The idea of removing the glass and replacing with wood is reasonably practical. Since the glass is relatively thin you would need to replace with a relatively thin wood piece. I would think that 1/4" or maybe 3/8" thick plywood would be able to be used in place of the glass. There are a number of things to consider though before embarking on this approach. ...


4

I would suggest a quick visit to any building supply recycling type place near you to see if you can simply grab an inexpensive replacement door that's already better suited to installing a pet-door in - you may have structural issues with this door if you cut away a significant part of the bottom to insert a pet door. Replacing glass panels with wood is not ...


4

Low-E windows are designed with material inside the glass or layered on it at the time of manufacture. Argon Gas windows are multiple-pane windows that are air-tight with the gap between the panes filled with argon at assembly. It is possible to get windows that are both at once. A Google search for Argon Windows brings up several links explaining Low-E ...


4

Get a combo sponge / squeegee on an extendable pole. They work very well. It is also possible to get these window washing soap bottles that have an integrated sprayer mechanism. You attach these to a garden hose for water. They easily can spray a nice and vigorous soapy stream or water at the windows over 20 feet (like 6 meters) high. Normally the ...


4

Use something like Goof Off or Goo Gone to dissolve the solvent, or something with orange oil in it, and then scrape it off. You might have to repeat a couple of times. BTW, taping windows provides no additional protection during a hurricane. Don't bother.


4

A sheet of cardboard cut to fit the window frame tightly. With a small finger hole or notch cut out so you can pull it out easily. Thick cardboard would be best so it doesnt bend. Practically free, blocks all light, does no damage, and can easily be removed in the morning and put back in at night.


3

Your options are: Use a second layer of 1/2" drywall to bring the wall flush to the window; Trim the window casing down by 1/2"; or Use inch thick trim on the window casing. Personally I recommend #2 and would use what's called a Japanese saw: or a multi-tool with a wood blade to trim the casing down to be flush with the wall.


3

First, kill the mold with bleach and wipe down the whole area to try to get rid of as many spores as possible. Next, identify and treat the root cause. Mold at the bottom of the inside would suggest that interior condensation is pooling there. Window condensation is caused by two factors: Interior glass temperatures below the dew point Humid enough ...


3

Removal is your best bet. Whether you use a heat gun, which much care will be needed since burning what will be bare wood eventually can easily occur. Also you will need to wear a respirator to get past any harmful fumes from the off gassing of the heated paint. Various shapes of scrapers will still be needed to clear out the crevices to freshen up the look ...


3

The oil that you applied to the crank joints is doing several things. Foremost it has eliminated the dryness in the joints that led to the squeaking. It is flushing out the years worth of wear dust and particulate that collected in the joints from operating them without lubrication. Oil present on the joints now will be a magnet for new dust and dirt from ...


3

The usual approach is a "crank-type" casement window with a loop in place of the crank handle, and a hook on a pole (try "clerestory pole crank" as a search term) that engages the loop. There are also hex-type versions that use a flexible shaft inside the pole. Or, these days, motors. I'd suggest the hook on a pole, I view motors in this sort of application ...


3

I don't like this question, simply because there are too many variables. "CAN it be detrimental?" Well... Windows come in single, double and triple pane; made from glass or plastic; have different insulation systems between panes, have different natural coatings and compositions for various properties such as UV protection or reflection; and many other ...


2

I have removed these before. A cut at the bottom bar, which is not anchored into the sill the way the sides and head is. When cut, the 2 bottom corners can draw in, allowing the flanges on the sides to begin to withdraw from the groove they are mudded into. You may want to nick the upper inside corners to make it easier to bend inwards. They might even snap ...


2

Whomever told you that hurricane windows are "required" wasn't being exactly truthful. The only requirement is that the window opening must be hurricane compliant which can be achieved through a combination of windows and shutters and will eliminate window breakage. The biggest drawback of hurricane impact windows (besides price) is that they will not ...


2

Any solution will be a compromise. The more light you block, the more air you will also block. You want something opaque and dark and non-reflective and adjustable. Some sort of slat blinds is a common solution, but if you have room to install a device away from the window, some other creative opportunities exist to block direct light but allow airflow ...


2

Soundproofing as it relates to windows is all about mass -- the denser the materials, the more sound reduction you'll get. PVC is, indeed, typically more dense than the far more lightweight aluminium and so will will resist noise transfer more. However, the amount of surface area made up by the frame is absolutely dwarfed by the glass itself. Any ...


2

It's a slider, as @bib says. No "special precautions" having to do with it being a slider when replacing - the precaution for any window opening (new or replacement) is accurate size/measurements, and careful attention to flashing to direct water correctly (the new window should have detailed instructions.) It's also normal and expected that the window does ...


2

I know around here there is a kind of temporary transparent caulking that can be put around windows and such to prevent air flow. In the winter, it prevents cold air to come in, and in the summer it can be put around window air conditioning units to prevent warm air from coming in and cool air from going out. This type of caulking is easy to remove at the ...


2

In many cases, repair of really old wood windows can be as or more expensive than replacement due to a variety of factors, one of which you have found--unavailability of off-the-shelf replacement parts. And after you're done, you still have leaky, single-glazed windows! I would only consider repairing these windows if they have architectural or historical ...


2

The important comparison is not between double glazed and single glazed windows. It is between specific windows and their specifications because there are high quality single glazed windows and low quality double glazed windows and even among one group or the other, thermal and acoustical performance can vary with manufacturer and part number. Generally ...


2

It used to be that such a window had to have tempered safety glass, now: 2006 IRC: R613.2 Window Sills. In dwelling units, where the opening of an operable window is located more than 72 inches above the finished grade or surface below, the lowest part of the clear opening of the window shall be a minimum of 24 inches above the finished floor of the room ...


2

I have migrane headaches and have to have a completely dark room to sleep. I bought solid pink insulation and cut it to fit my windows. painted the side one side white and then still hung blackout curtains. you can not see your hand in front of your face in the middle of the day, but you can sleep.


2

The short answer is maybe, it really depends on what it was affixed with and how thick the granite piece is. The key to removing it (or anything) without breaking it will be to have multiple pry points simultaneously, or use a piece of wood (2x4) so that you are prying against the wood which can then spread the strain you are putting on the granite piece. ...


2

I typically use Goo Gone (US product), will remove most. Rubbing Alcohol is another item that works for some adhesive. Or clorox wipes also works on some.



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