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9

You're dealing with a basic fact of nature, water condenses on cold objects, so you need to either remove the water or the cold objects. The windows will typically be the coldest objects in your home since they have such a low R value. Start by reducing the humidity in your home, run exhaust fans in the kitchen and bathroom for longer when cooking and ...


6

I had a similar problem. It was easy enough to remove the window, and take it to my local glass shop. They had a new pane put in by the next day. If it's a screened window, you can do this when the weather is nice. Otherwise, you'll need to cut a piece of plywood to block the hole while it's being repaired. Taking it into the shop allows for ...


6

1. New roof. If you've got a leaky roof, you've got big problems. 2. New Siding. Since it sounds like you'll be adjusting the thickness of the walls, it makes sense to complete this job before anything else that will be installed on/in the wall. 3. New Gutters. Depending on what shape the gutters are in, this might move up or down the list. If they are ...


5

The wall seems to have 'full dimension' studs and the markings of old lath and plaster. I don't see plywood sheathing on the exterior walls. All in all I'm guessing that your house was built prior to WWII and is either 'post and beam' or 'balloon frame' construction, both of which are radically different in terms of structure and loads from modern ...


5

Passive infrared sensors (PIR), use Infrared (IR) light to detect motion. Unfortunately for you, infrared light does not travel through glass so well.


5

An arch (if engineered correctly) is self supporting. No need for a lintel at all. From the looks of it, that arch is more than adequate to hold the brick above so I'd say that wooden piece is merely a filler--not a structural element.


4

You will want to clean the area first. Scrape and moderately sand any peeling paint. Afterwards use a latex caulking which you can find at any home improvement store. This caulking is paintable which is the main reason I would use it and also shrinks and expands with temperature and moisture changes. Once the caulk is completely cured according to the ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

Most code states that all railing balusters must be spaced no more than 4" apart to prevent a child from inserting their head. So, that is one measurement you could use...if you don't want anyone's head to get through: 4". Of course, also make sure you can't get an arm through that could reach the window lock. Edit by OP: According to ...


4

Very interesting situation. First off, replacing perfectly good vinyl windows is not going to help you from what I see on your pics. Simple weeping drains around windows is not going to help much with all the moisture I see on walls, ceilings and floor. I would suggest you have someone come in with an infrared scanner and make a sweep of the building to ...


4

You may be able to run the screw right into the framing with out using the anchors. It will hold much better if it is framing and not wood lath or masonry. if the brackets are directly over the window, you may have found the header.


4

The only logical that comes to my mind is an awning of some sort. If you get a big enough one, most direct light will be lost and you should have the same amount of airflow.


3

You don't need the manufacturer. Glass repair is common enough - there should be at least one window/glass repair shops around. The repair process generally consists of the repair guy measuring the glass, preparing a replacement pane in a shop, then bringing it back to the house and replacing the glass while the window is in the wall. The downside is it's ...


3

I realize that you don't want to proceed with the project but I thought I'd answer anyway in case someone else is curious. I am a licensed contractor and my company specializes in basement remodeling; we have done several window expansions or additions in concrete foundations. A few things: You definitely need a permit for this project (though you don't ...


3

Rough openings are exactly as they are called, rough. Yours sounds extra rough though. All rough openings are made to have space to add shims, sometimes the rough openings, because of conditions, can only take shims on one side or the other. As a rule of thumb I usually do not use no more than 2 shims on a side. If the rough opening (RO) has need for more, ...


3

Removal is your best bet. Whether you use a heat gun, which much care will be needed since burning what will be bare wood eventually can easily occur. Also you will need to wear a respirator to get past any harmful fumes from the off gassing of the heated paint. Various shapes of scrapers will still be needed to clear out the crevices to freshen up the look ...


3

The oil that you applied to the crank joints is doing several things. Foremost it has eliminated the dryness in the joints that led to the squeaking. It is flushing out the years worth of wear dust and particulate that collected in the joints from operating them without lubrication. Oil present on the joints now will be a magnet for new dust and dirt from ...


2

It is hard to tell from the picture how wide it is. If it is 1/8 inch or less I would caulk it. If it is bigger than I would go over it with wood putty. You can paint over each. Also if you use wood putty chances are it will eventually form a small crack (expansion) and need to be caulked.


2

I seem to remember using Windex.. Long soak, cover with plastic wrap for 30-60 min, scrape carefully with wide (6 to 8 inch) putty knife or drywall blade or wall paper knife. I was able to save my first new vehicle sticker.


2

As mac has mentioned, an energy audit is a logical starting point. I would shop for a "blower door" test that measures actual system air leakage. The other test would be a thermal IR scan, that will reveal relative hot/cold spots. Some utilities offer discounted audits.


2

Anything can be done but it's hard for me to believe this is a DIY project. You will need to find a way to bridge over the window with an arch or header in such a way that the load is adequately supported. Also if the wall is important to the lateral strength of the building (and an exterior solid masonry wall probably is), you need to make sure the entire ...


2

There are a number of companies that provide windows with high STC ratings. The series 7000 windows from http://www.silent-guard.com appear to have STC of 40 and above. There are many other manufacturers that sell sound attenuating windows. I believe you are correct that to get what you want you'll have to specify specific windows. The way you describe ...


2

OK. You were right in all of you assertions. Really basic picture of a properly framed window. The contractor should not step foot in your house again. He is a moron. He can't even make a good excuse. Also and this is worse than the improper framing technique. The current layout is in no way set at right angles.


2

From looking at your pictures I can say that it was not done correctly. Sad part is that it is so easy to do it correctly when the studs are all open. There really should be doubled headers above and below the window. They should, in both cases, be resting on the top of studs that extend from the ends of the header down to a bearing surface all the way to ...


2

How about permanently mounting lift-off hinges or something similar to the window frames, and using the mating part on the plywood to secure the boards to the windows?


2

I had a similar problem and added a length of corrugated tubing to my existing downspouts. What was happening is that the water came down the downspouts too close to the house. It did not have time to soak into the ground and pooled around the foundation. So using some black corrugated pipe and the right adapters got that water 5-10 feet from the house. ...


2

You can stack molding. Perhaps a piece of square stock, then a separate quarter round "shoe molding" as you illustrated. Be sure to keep your hardwood floor expansion gap intact. Complex molding is often built up from simpler shapes: once painted you never notice.


2

You can get a Tilt and Turn window - a window that tilts inwards slightly (and locks in place so that it doesn't tip back anymore) to let air circulate, but can also be opened as a traditional window too (albeit one that typically opens inwards instead of outwards).


2

I like the answer JonW gave, but also would suggest just putting an awning over your existing window and opening it from the top as it's likely to be a bit less expensive. Edit: I passed this house fixed type awning system and decided to grab a shot to add t this post


2

Those 27 inch blinds you link to are top mount and will fit in a 27.5 inch opening without modification. But there are also side mount ones that would also work but you would need to add a 1/4 inch shim to both sides or a 1/2 inch shim to one side. Most blinds can't be simply cut down in width except those that are designed to be cut to length.



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