Hot answers tagged

18

We were all young once. You need a Torx screwdriver of the appropriate size https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torx Actually due to the pin in the middle it is more technically security Torx. Harbour Freight will get you out of trouble cheaply.


15

I have personally seen it bow "trimmer" studs in a framed window opening. It could easily warp, bow, or move a window frame itself. Breakage would likely be caused by users messing with/forcing the out of plumb/square/true window? Note: you can buy "low expansion" foam specifically designed to avoid this issue.


12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


7

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


7

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ...


6

Cardboard, and tape. Probably the cheapest option, as you can probably acquire the cardboard for free.


6

In a miter joint you're gluing end grain to end grain. That's inherently weaker than most joints. If you really want this appearance, at least spline the corners so there's significant long-grain gluing area. A mitered half-lap would be another possibility, or one of the other joints that mimics a miter in appearance but has something stronger underneath ...


6

There may be a brick that has that shape already, but I have not seen any. If there were, they would be custom ordered. To match your brick you have in place would even be a taller order. Bricks made in one time of year under the same name will differ in color and texture to a degree from brick of the same name from the same company, just made at a different ...


6

From experience, yes it can cause windows, doors, etc. to stick because the pressure pushes the frame closer to the door or sash. I just completed the finish work in a house and had to use my sawzall like a rasp around window frames to relieve the pressure before I could put the trim on them. I am not sure if the stuff can generate enough force to actually ...


6

First of all, building codes covering private residences are typically not the same as larger commercial buildings. In the USA those are often the IRC and IBC, respectively (although each state has their own versions and amendments). But to the issue you asked about: were the windows into the hallway operable? Hotel windows are usually inoperable and are ...


5

One of the main purposes of moldings, such as the trim around doors and windows (called casings), is to act as a barrier and seal to wind and water intrusion. Moldings on wall between vertical boards, called battens served a similar purpose. The decorative element was an extra benefit (unless you are an extreme modernist/minimalist who wants totally flat ...


5

Condensation between the glass on multi-pane windows means the seal is compromised and the inert gas between the panes has escaped. So, yes... something is wrong.


4

A sheet of cardboard cut to fit the window frame tightly. With a small finger hole or notch cut out so you can pull it out easily. Thick cardboard would be best so it doesnt bend. Practically free, blocks all light, does no damage, and can easily be removed in the morning and put back in at night.


4

Use something like Goof Off or Goo Gone to dissolve the solvent, or something with orange oil in it, and then scrape it off. You might have to repeat a couple of times. BTW, taping windows provides no additional protection during a hurricane. Don't bother.


4

Obviously there may be local restrictions, but on the 4 wells I had installed last year they highest one is about 3" above the surrounding ground level. I agree - that looks rather awful. I'd definitely ask them to replace it with a better sized well. My guess would be that was the one they brought and they didn't want to deal with having to go get a ...


4

Translucent film lets a lot of light through and provides privacy as well (as long as you don't get to close to the window). There are window films with beautiful patterns and even ones that can be attached to window panes without an adhesive. (I think I'm not allowed to suggest a brand here.)


4

If the cracked bricks are loose (as in when you wiggle them they move) they should be removed and new brick installed (or clean the old ones of mortar). If the cracked bricks are sound and secure the gaps should be filled ,as you noted, to keep water from further damaging the sill. There are many colors of concrete-type caulking, so if desired the gaps ...


3

Depending on the size, weight would be my only structural concern. A large window well filled only with concrete is going to weigh a ton. That could potentially put unwanted pressure on the foundation. The windows should be blocked/bricked in, add some below grade sealer/barrier (whatever the foundation of the building is made of), the hole filled with ...


3

Specifically (without getting into product recommendations), look for "static cling film" as opposed to an adhesive product. You can get both mirrored and "stained glass" versions - they apply with water and a squeegee, and peel off again without a fight or residue. "Privacy film" is another search term; or "window privacy film." The stained glass or ...


3

I had never seen these before, but I was finally able to track down some information and replace them. My windows bear a "Viking" name, but I didn't find anyone selling parts under that name. However, the useful term for these are "channel balance" or "block and tackle balance" windows. With that term, it's possible to find replacement parts and even some ...


3

They block the light differently depending on where the sun is, and how much light you want to let in.


3

In my experience, sealing the window wells is only temporary- its pretty hard to outsmart nature, especially over time. Instead, provide an escape route. For critters (with legs), lining your window wells with (vertical) chicken wire provides them sufficient traction to crawl up and out. I have cast concrete window wells (~1.5' deep) and this seems to ...


3

I have seen it warp a window frame to the point that makes it difficult to operate, but, I have not seen it expand to the point it breaks a window.


3

As odd as it may seem, it's a roof. A bay window roof. In the picture you provide, it's actually a roof for the lower bay window, as opposed to being part of the upper bay window.


3

If it's on the window glass the simplest way to remove any foreign substance without the risk of harsh chemicals , is with a single edged razor blade. If you install the blade in a retractable holder you can extend the reach of the blade. Hold the blade at a 25-40 degree angle.


3

Those are safety catches that prevent the window from being opened all the way. They pop out, and with the window unlocked, they let it open just a few inches. Supposedly an intruder cannot open the window enough to crawl in, and more importantly a child cannot crawl or fall out. If these little catches are not in place then all you have are cosmetic ...


3

Windows above 72 inches from exterior grade are required to have a sill at least 24 inches off the floor to meet 2012 IRC requirements, which should be what you're required to comply with (IRC at least, it might not be 2012 but AFAIK it's been 24 inches for years). If you can limit the windows from opening more than 4 inches, or use a "Window Opening Control ...


2

I am a graveyard shift worker. I found the best solution is a cheap sleep mask you can get at Walgreens. Total blackout for you leaves light when you want it. Not being sarcastic, just this is what I found over years trying to sleep during the day.


2

If you're building custom frames, take a scrap piece of the frame, cut it to the inside width of your frame, use it as a temporary support... like a cross bar... if you do not have extra material, or you're re-screening old frames, maybe a thin piece of wood will work for your temporary cross bar? Also, I like to use a T-square, it helps keep the frame ...


2

You ignore the primary purpose of awnings - which is to ventilate. Awnings are primarily 'air scoops'. As wind encounters a structure it has to flow up or around the object. Awnings, and awning type windows, serve to 'catch' this upward flowing air and direct it into the open window. A simple double hung window captures only the air flow which directly ...



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