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9

You're dealing with a basic fact of nature, water condenses on cold objects, so you need to either remove the water or the cold objects. The windows will typically be the coldest objects in your home since they have such a low R value. Start by reducing the humidity in your home, run exhaust fans in the kitchen and bathroom for longer when cooking and ...


6

1. New roof. If you've got a leaky roof, you've got big problems. 2. New Siding. Since it sounds like you'll be adjusting the thickness of the walls, it makes sense to complete this job before anything else that will be installed on/in the wall. 3. New Gutters. Depending on what shape the gutters are in, this might move up or down the list. If they are ...


5

The wall seems to have 'full dimension' studs and the markings of old lath and plaster. I don't see plywood sheathing on the exterior walls. All in all I'm guessing that your house was built prior to WWII and is either 'post and beam' or 'balloon frame' construction, both of which are radically different in terms of structure and loads from modern ...


5

I had a similar problem. It was easy enough to remove the window, and take it to my local glass shop. They had a new pane put in by the next day. If it's a screened window, you can do this when the weather is nice. Otherwise, you'll need to cut a piece of plywood to block the hole while it's being repaired. Taking it into the shop allows for ...


4

I see damage to sill (under window), brick mold (covers/protects L/R window edge). Not shown but certainly contributing is the flashing/dripedge/overhang ABOVE window. If rot extends through sill and there wasn't proper waterproofing UNDER the sill and above the basic framing, your wall below the window is at risk. This looks like a replacement window ...


4

Buy paper window shades. Specifically the ones that are folded like an accordion and have an adhesive edge at the top. Trim them to the width of your windows. Lay them out flat and paint one or both sides black with spray paint. Stick them up behind the Venetian blinds. If you only painted one side then you can face the white side out if you are concerned ...


4

The standard approach to sealing the top of the lower sash raised for the AC is a foam strip placed between the outward facing uper edge of the inner sash and the outer glass pane. This gap is on the inside of the house. The birds you mention must be getting in through the lower gap between the lower rail of the upper sash and the glass pane on the ...


4

You will want to clean the area first. Scrape and moderately sand any peeling paint. Afterwards use a latex caulking which you can find at any home improvement store. This caulking is paintable which is the main reason I would use it and also shrinks and expands with temperature and moisture changes. Once the caulk is completely cured according to the ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

Most code states that all railing balusters must be spaced no more than 4" apart to prevent a child from inserting their head. So, that is one measurement you could use...if you don't want anyone's head to get through: 4". Of course, also make sure you can't get an arm through that could reach the window lock. Edit by OP: According to ...


4

Passive infrared sensors (PIR), use Infrared (IR) light to detect motion. Unfortunately for you, infrared light does not travel through glass so well.


3

Are you taking about one of these things? If so, you might not want to cut it down. The lip should be a bit higher than the surrounding grade so that rainwater doesn't run in to the well. If you don't cut it, you might be able to decorate it. However, if you really want to cut it then you can use a reciprocating saw. If the metal is too thick, you ...


3

I realize that you don't want to proceed with the project but I thought I'd answer anyway in case someone else is curious. I am a licensed contractor and my company specializes in basement remodeling; we have done several window expansions or additions in concrete foundations. A few things: You definitely need a permit for this project (though you don't ...


3

You don't need the manufacturer. Glass repair is common enough - there should be at least one window/glass repair shops around. The repair process generally consists of the repair guy measuring the glass, preparing a replacement pane in a shop, then bringing it back to the house and replacing the glass while the window is in the wall. The downside is it's ...


3

Rough openings are exactly as they are called, rough. Yours sounds extra rough though. All rough openings are made to have space to add shims, sometimes the rough openings, because of conditions, can only take shims on one side or the other. As a rule of thumb I usually do not use no more than 2 shims on a side. If the rough opening (RO) has need for more, ...


2

Get a set of second hand curtains from the local second hand shop. We just did this to our master bedroom. Now we own the house but didn't want to pay a lot of money for curtains and my wife found some really nice second hand roman blinds for $7.50 each. We put them underneath our regular curtains and the room stays warmer at night and significantly ...


2

I'm pretty sure you've already considered this, but just in case you haven't... It may be an obvious option, but the direction your blinds face is pretty important... To block street- and auto lights, you'll want to make sure inside edges turn down, if you're any higher than the first floor.


2

Hire someone that can do an energy audit. Check with your local utilities as they may even offer rebates on the cost of that. They'll use a Thermal Imaging Camera that can answer this question for you. It's not so much whether or not your windows are a problem as much as it is the bigger question "what parts of your house are the problem". Even if your ...


2

My 70 year old grandma just put up new blinds in her house last year. She did borrow my makita. Quick Tips make sure you are putting your screws into either the window frame, wood framing, or use anchors make sure your blinds are level so if blinds are outside of window frame either use a level or take a measurement from the top of each side cut blinds ...


2

To reduce heat gain from the sun, you need a window with a good "low e" rating (also called low emissivity). You can get similar results on an existing window by adding a film that reflects IR. You also want multi-layer windows to block heat transmission (a lower U value is better, it's the inverse measurement of an R value you see on insulation). And ...


2

Some ideas to try: Paint the window frames white. This will reflect the light instead of absorbing it. This might make quite a difference by itself Cover the frames with XPS foam. On the inside you'd need to cover the foam with drywall or another fire barrier. Plant a tree or bush near the window to help shade it Replace the window with a vinyl window. ...


2

If your windows have a little bit of play, pull down first. You can pull down much harder than you can push up, without damaging the window. Once you hear the pop of the paint freeing, you can push up normally. I'll even put all the force on one side and then another. You'll still want to cut away any obvious locations where the paint is sticking, but if ...


2

These may be "insert" window replacements/upgrades. An existing window has the jambs and parting bead removed. Then this unit is inserted and the original stop bead on the outside and inside holds this unit in place. You can use the same idea.. trim the rough opening out so this window fits snugly. (Trim it like you would a door, with jambs and trim ...


2

It is hard to tell from the picture how wide it is. If it is 1/8 inch or less I would caulk it. If it is bigger than I would go over it with wood putty. You can paint over each. Also if you use wood putty chances are it will eventually form a small crack (expansion) and need to be caulked.


2

I had a similar problem and added a length of corrugated tubing to my existing downspouts. What was happening is that the water came down the downspouts too close to the house. It did not have time to soak into the ground and pooled around the foundation. So using some black corrugated pipe and the right adapters got that water 5-10 feet from the house. ...


2

There are a number of companies that provide windows with high STC ratings. The series 7000 windows from http://www.silent-guard.com appear to have STC of 40 and above. There are many other manufacturers that sell sound attenuating windows. I believe you are correct that to get what you want you'll have to specify specific windows. The way you describe ...


2

Anything can be done but it's hard for me to believe this is a DIY project. You will need to find a way to bridge over the window with an arch or header in such a way that the load is adequately supported. Also if the wall is important to the lateral strength of the building (and an exterior solid masonry wall probably is), you need to make sure the entire ...


2

From looking at your pictures I can say that it was not done correctly. Sad part is that it is so easy to do it correctly when the studs are all open. There really should be doubled headers above and below the window. They should, in both cases, be resting on the top of studs that extend from the ends of the header down to a bearing surface all the way to ...


2

OK. You were right in all of you assertions. Really basic picture of a properly framed window. The contractor should not step foot in your house again. He is a moron. He can't even make a good excuse. Also and this is worse than the improper framing technique. The current layout is in no way set at right angles.


2

You can get a Tilt and Turn window - a window that tilts inwards slightly (and locks in place so that it doesn't tip back anymore) to let air circulate, but can also be opened as a traditional window too (albeit one that typically opens inwards instead of outwards).



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