Hot answers tagged

12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


7

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ...


7

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


6

First of all, building codes covering private residences are typically not the same as larger commercial buildings. In the USA those are often the IRC and IBC, respectively (although each state has their own versions and amendments). But to the issue you asked about: were the windows into the hallway operable? Hotel windows are usually inoperable and are ...


3

Windows above 72 inches from exterior grade are required to have a sill at least 24 inches off the floor to meet 2012 IRC requirements, which should be what you're required to comply with (IRC at least, it might not be 2012 but AFAIK it's been 24 inches for years). If you can limit the windows from opening more than 4 inches, or use a "Window Opening Control ...


2

You don't have to caulk something just because you normally caulk it. There is a reason why everything is done and learning this will save you time and money. Since you've had the home for a year already, I'd guess that you know if water leaks in or if you can feel drafts near them? If so, caulk it. If you have a reasonable doubt that they might not be ...


2

Nearly any door can be broken with minimal effort. The vulnerabilities are numerous. You are correct in identifying glass as one of them, but even with no glass, kicking in the door at the lock is another easy method unless the strike plate has been replaced with a special thick steel high-security model. Hinges can be another vulnerability if they're only ...


1

While this might not be a huge problem on its own, it has some negative side effects. Your windows are letting a lot of cold in through the pane and around the edges. This significantly increases heating costs and it can add uncomfortable drafts. If that frost melts and runs into the wood, it can cause mold which potentially could turn into a big problem. ...


1

I find the best bet is the shrink wrap plastic kits, because on a sunny day the warmth from the sun is way more efficient than simply keeping cold air out (which the plastic does anyway). Unless of course the window is facing north, then the sun won't benefit you but you will still stop the draft from coming in. I installed them throughout my house and it ...


1

I'll give another answer from my own experience.. We did 2 layers with the first layer underneath being bubble wrap. I have an unfinished basement with two old single pane windows. They simply had a curtain over them, but were still losing a lot of heat. I saw this idea online and it seems to work great for us and provides an easy and cheap secondary layer. ...


1

There are, as always, tradeoffs. First, 1 inch is more than is generally considered ideal - 1/2" or so is preferred as it's less prone to internal convection currents. Yes, plastic window film kits are often installed with considerably larger spacing, but they are also commonly installed on less than ideal windows where they stop actual drafts... Any ...


1

Ice forms in that location because 1) heat is lost where the two panes of glass are connected by the metal frame, and 2) cold air sinks to the bottom of the window opening. I don't see any red flags that indicate air leakage or other serious issues. The fact that the entire glass pane frosts up at times reinforces that position. You have simple heat ...


1

I think you might be going about this the wrong way. I saw in comments on your question about using a double-cylinder deadbolt on your front and rear entry doors. This is a bad idea, and may even violate local building codes, depending on whether your state/county/local authority has adopted the International Residential Code(IRC). According to the above ...


1

Polycarbonate is used for bulletproof glass in passenger trains. You don't have to worry about cinder blocks coming at you at 125 mph, so you don't need it 7/16” thick. Does the door have a normal glass panel in addition to the stained glass? If so, replace with polycarbonate. If not, alter the window molding to fit it. Nobody but you will even know it's ...



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