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14

If this is a submersible pump in a fairly shallow well and it is running continuously and only putting out 20psi, you have several possible problems: The impeller assembly is coming apart and there is excessive internal leakage in the pump. There is a leak in the pipe leading from the pump to the well-head, either the pipe has split, or the barb fitting ...


11

If the pump is a 3-wire submersible with a control box, you can do some basic troubleshooting with an ohm meter without pulling it. If you have a control box like this: Then you can pull the top off. Inside there are terminals that have black, yellow and red wires that go to the pump. Inside the cover of the control box, it will tell you the resistance ...


7

The biggest difference in solid and stranded is the flexibility of stranded. It is easier to pull and bend. One does not handle more amperage or voltage than the other, unless you get into fine stranded cable like a battery or welder, which are not used as building wire.


6

Typically 100psi poly is used (it's a black flexible pipe with a blue stripe). You should be using brass or poly fittings. I personally avoid nylon, just because with the threaded parts it tends to have the tool grip worn down - it's especially a pain when you go to take it off years after it's been put on, and you need to apply a lot of torque: it tends to ...


5

At 2.5 GPM, your 2-3 minutes of shower time between cycles is using between 5 and 7.5 gallons. If your tank starts at 60psi and 7.5 gallons is enough to bring it down to 40psi, that means you're starting out with 15 gallons of air in your 40 gallon tank, and ending the 3-minute cycle with 22.5 gallons of air. I calculated this using Boyle's law, or P1 * V1 ...


5

A larger tank will cause the cycles to be longer (slower), but overall the runtime will be the same (if you use 500 gallons of water, the pump has to supply 500 gallons of water). For example, if the tank is full and you open a tap, with a 36 gallon tank it may take 60 seconds before the pump starts, and then 30 seconds to run, and repeat. With a 55 gallon, ...


4

I had the very same question when I sized my generator to run my well-pump during power outages. I purchased a clamp meter for under $100 and tested the pump on household current. I simply attached the meter to the hot line and then turned on the pump. My pump is 220 volt with two hot wires so I had to multiply the results by 2. Unfortunately, I have ...


4

The part that jumped out at me is this: "4" well with a submerged pump and a pressure tank in the garage." How big is your pressure tank? My guess is that the greater water draw of a 1/2 or 5/8 inch hose can drain the tank in 15 minutes. The washer or shower has a much lower flow rate in gallons per minute used than a hose. When the pressure is low from ...


4

The first: Whip -> Washer -> Hole in Box -> Nut (rubber washer outside box) not Whip -> Hole in Box -> Washer -> Nut (rubber washer inside box) You want the plastic washer on the outside for a watertight seal, and the nut on the box for mechanical strength and with a metal box, to bond the fitting to the box electrically.


3

Think of the electricity flowing into your house just like water flowing through a pipe. If you turn on a faucet only halfway then you will probably not notice a drop in pressure elsewhere in the house. But if your washing machine is filling (or your irrigation system kicks in, etc.) then you will see reduced pressure elsewhere in the house. The ...


3

From my answer before: When you connect this pipe to the fittings, you'll need to heat it up (I prefer MEP gas but propane works as well) just enough so it can go on (you still need to apply a bit of force). If you heat it too much to the point it stretches, you'll weaken the pipe and probably cause a leak - if you do this, cut the end off and start over....


3

The short answer is, depending on the source of the water table, it should fill back up over time. But there are many reasons, other than you leaving the hose on for a day, why your well can run dry. Are there any new building developments in the area? Is your region suffering from low rain or snow fall this year? Or, if there's excessive rain/snowfall, ...


3

There's trouble with the pressure tank. You are right to be concerned. Its bad for the pump to be running constantly. Is there a pressure gauge? What does it read? Is the P-Tank full of water? It could be simply needs to be charged with air compressor. When was last time?


3

Turn off the power to the pump. Turn off the feed to the house (there should be a valve between the pressure tank and rest of house). This is simply to make the next step easier. Drain any water from the pipes where the pressure switch is screwed in. Usually there is a sed valve. Unscrew the existing gauge. Check the T where the gauge was screwed in for ...


3

It's possible it's the pressure tank. To check the pre-charge, turn the pump off, and then open a faucet to let all the water out. Check the pressure in the tank using a tire pressure gauge (there is a valve on the top). This should be 2-10 PSI below the "start" pressure of the pump: eg, if your pump comes on at 40psi (on at 40/off at 60 is the most common ...


3

I'd guess that the recovery rate on your well is sufficient for your daily use, but not for the extended used that occured with the hose. As a result, the water level in your well has probably dropped to the point that the intake tube isn't completely submerged, so it's drawing less water. If you can reduce your water usage for a few days, it will likely ...


3

We did turn off the water last night and the power to the water pump and found that over a couple hours time we lost all the water in our reserve tank. Does this sound like a leak to you? Maybe. Was the reservoir tank cut off (like with a valve) from draining back down the well? If there is a check valve, is it in good working order? If not, it is hard ...


3

If you already own the generator I say go for it and try it out. If the generator is anywhere decent then it will regulate the voltage more than enough for a motor so you won't over power the motor with voltage. If the generator can't handle it you will not harm the motor unless you are able to stall it for an extended period of time; the generator shouldn't ...


3

I would believe the pump isn't keeping up with demand and the pressure tank is supplementing it for the first 15 minutes. Where I live the pump can run at full steam and the pressure tank is used for reducing the number of times the pump turns on and off. Test - Turn off the pump attach a hose closest to the pump and drain the water tank. Leaving the ...


3

You are experiencing a fairly normal event for a well with pump and pressure tank, though if the behavior seems new & different the pressure tank may require maintenance or repair/replacement. Most well pumps (there are exceptions, such as "constant pressure pumps") run on a simple differential pressure switch with a 20 PSI differential (often non-...


2

Dry Pump failure modes Some irrigation pumps are created the impeller housing casting an integral part of the motor and depend on the water flow through the pump to dissipate heat instead of using rotor fins and airflow for cooling. The reason for doing this is that they tend to be in high moisture locations or locations where detritus can be sucked into ...


2

Your aphorism of the day: Theory and Practice are the same in Theory, but Different in Practice. As a practical matter it's going to be near-impossible to fabricate, install, and install a pump or suction pipe into a plastic-sheet-tube without poking a hole in the plastic. If you manage to succeed, you've disabled your well - if no water can get out, no ...


2

Check the water pressure & air pressure of your system when the water almost stops flowing as you've described (i.e. before the pump engages). You may have a small hole in your bladder. The other possibilities are: The valve that your incompetent service person opened is not opened completely. That would cause the incoming water to not keep up with ...


2

You may have a pump protection device controlling power to your pump. If you have this device there may be a problem with it or you pump causing it to act like this. Search "Pumptec Franklin" ours acted similarly when the device faulted.


2

This would appear to be most likely a faulty pressure switch. Start there. The job of the pressure switch is to turn on when the water pressure is low, and turn off when it is high enough - this is most commonly a 20 PSI range (ie, 20-40, 30-50 or 40-60 PSI.) The pump is evidently working. The pressure gauge is evidently working unless you see some ...


2

The link is just a standard 4 pole relay it will not help other being an on off device. A motor inverter is a device that takes line voltage and adjust the voltage and frequency. With a very old motors it is not advisable to use inverters or soft starts because of the harmonics generated will cause the bearings to be destroyed in a matter of months. Pump ...


1

Thats right. You need air in the tank. OR the bladder has ruptured. Either way you need air in the tank, and likely need to put more air in about twice a year until you replace the P tank.


1

I figured it out. It turns out that part 16 (gasket) and 17 (cast-iron seal plate) (which to me, looked like part of the casing (part 1) came apart to allow the casing to slide off. I didn't realize they were separate from the casing as they were flush with it and painted the same blue color all over. The two pieces popped apart fairly effortlessly at the ...


1

You face two challenges here: silt and moisture. Silt could gum up brushings (if present) or bearings. Assuming the pump is full of clean water the usual drying techniques apply: Disassemble to the greatest degree reasonable. Rinse with clean water (no need to be shy for a pump). Use compressed air to blow water out. A bike pump works in a pinch. Use a ...


1

Provided that the motor did not run while wet, then the windings are probably fine because they are encased in enamel. But if it's still wet inside, or dirty, or you have a seized bearing, then trying to run it could burn out the windings. At that point you're looking at replacing the stator or the whole motor. So the question of whether to run it or not ...



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