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7

The simplest solution will be to install a larger door sweep on the inside. Sweeps come in a variety of sizes and styles. Check the out at any home improvement store. They easily attach to the door with a few screws and are adjustable so you can be sure they gently touch the floor and solve your gap problem


7

Wait a minute... that may be a very, very bad idea. sorry kacalapy. All I can see is messy carpet after that try. If this carpet is laid on concrete, then the tack strip is fastened with masonry nails, and if installed properly is chiseled over the edge. No way caulking is going to seal the gaps causing the air leaks. If your leaks are that bad, then do ...


5

If your leaking problem is from loose fitting window sashes or a poor fitting door, the simplest and cheapest method would be to purchase some self-adhesive foam weather stripping. This rolled product can be easily installed at the bottom of a window or around the outside edge of the door frame. Select the smallest size that will help seal the gaps, then ...


4

When you have to fill the gap, use steel wool (not Brillo pads, but stuff you can get at Home Depot or Lowes) and then put a foam sealer around it. It'll stop the mice from eating through.


3

Sealing the vapor barrier You'll want to seal the vapor barrier to the fan housing using an acoustic sealant like OSI® SC-170™, or similar product (you might have to do this from above). Just make sure the sealant is approved for use with vapor barrier, some sealants won't adhere well to the vapor barrier. If there is enough plastic to lap up the side of ...


3

You could use a spray foam insulation like Great Stuff. It sticks to just about everything and expands to fill voids.


3

I have seen this type of weather stripping many times on sliding doors. There is a flange on the weather stripping that fits into the mill work. It is a bit difficult to remove, and even harder to replace. They sell the replacements at most box stores. It is important to remove the flange from a small dido (gap) in the frame. Putting the new one in is ...


3

There is a removable clear caulk you can buy from most home improvement stores that you can use to seal that window and peel the stuff off. I bought some from Menards at $2.50 each on sale. Caulking guns can be bought for a couple of bucks.


3

Get a window insulator kit. It is made of a clear, plastic material that goes over the window, with double-sided tape around the edges to seal it. It's easy to set up and helps a lot with drafty windows.


2

If you can actually see the gaps in the windows, a can of "Great Stuff" would probably do the trick. It's an expanding foam that you spray into gaps. Or you could use a squeeze tube of "DAP Silicon II" and run a bead of it around the window. I'm going to assume that if you're in an apartment for the short term you either don't have a caulking gun or don't ...


2

Definitely would be helpful to see a picture, but something like this under-door weather stripping attaches directly underneath the door and I doubt your cat would be able to get to it.


2

Interesting question Mike. Last I knew rubber and plastic weren't on the Chez Mouse Menu. I would think that there may be some attractant stored in your garage that may be attracting them. Things like dry pet foods, nesting materials or pet water bowls can attract the little dears. Take a good look around your area for concentration of droppings. This may ...


2

Identification in order, P, Half-Round and Quarter-Round Referred to as door seal or weatherstrip. Commonly available for aircraft door seal and older automotive trunk and door weatherstrip. You can get EPDM variants for home door seal use from WeatherKing or MD. The larger stuff used in automotive can be obtained by the roll from industrial supplies ...


1

Is the weather seal screwed in? I would recommend removing the weather seal and replacing it with new. Install the top piece first. Do not cut it long so you have to force it into place; cut it to fit tight at the ends but you should not have to force it into place. use ring shanked colored nails and nail about every 6-9". Do not over tighten the nails, ...


1

For thermal, you'll want closed cell foam of some sort. If the wall has to be structural, I'd frame with vertical 2x4s, then on the interior, horizontal 1x1s, spray foam, then your metal panels. If it doesn't have to be structural, 4" of XPS foam board should work. That'd be about the best you could do for a thermal barrier. As for sound proofing, ...


1

Most likely it is a compression fit with some kind of adhesive. It's not so common to find pre-manufactured windows with nailed strips, although you do get after-market ones. You can buy the weather strips in big packs and re-affix it yourself. I am not sure what type of adhesive is meant to be used but I would assume wood PVC glue would do it.


1

Essentially, you get what you pay for. The cheaper ones (e.g. vinyl) work okay to block wind, but are very susceptible to wear and tear, may rip, may pull off the door entirely, leak if your floor or sill is uneven (they can conform but only a little), and only provide a wind block rather than true insulation. Also, they leak around the edges. But they are ...



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