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9

The Consumer Product Safety Commission has a chart for this: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/323.html Fall Height In Feet From Which A Life Threatening Head Injury Would Not Be Expected Type of Material 6 "Depth 9 " Depth 12" Depth Double Shredded Bark Mulch 6 10 11 Wood Chips 7 10 ...


4

This style center screw extends into the outlet: it's possible both parts need replacing. Pull on the cover to add tension when removing the stripped screw. Turn off the juice before taking the cover off. Your new 'in service' cover comes with a foam gasket: do not use caulk. Your existing box is probably fine, but when things are open evaluate if ...


3

The NEC book does not address the issue, though many Outlet Suppliers have cut-sheets that say to mount with the ground up. From the brief comments I had with Electricians and Inspectors, it because if a plug is pulled slightly out form a outlet, there is a potential for something to connect the Hot/Neutral together by landing across the two spades. If the ...


2

The answers to the question you linked to apply here as well. THERE IS NO STANDARD (in residential situations). If you talk to 10 electricians, you'll get 11 reasons why it should be one way or the other. Ultimately, the manufacturer can print the labels whichever direction they choose. Concluding that a receptacle should be installed with ground up or ...


2

The brochures I've read suggest that OSB3 is designed for humid conditions rather than wet conditions. OSB3 should be covered and fully protected from the elements.


2

All exterior wood finishes that are "suitable for sun exposure" still slowly degrade in the sun (it's worse than water, actually) and need to be renewed - Just ask the folks with wooden boats. So whether or not the current finish is "weather resistant" (since "weather proof" is not really accurate) it will need to be renewed. The simplest approach is to ...


2

UV light is actually probably a bigger concern than water. All but the most delicate finishes will provide decent water resistance, but UV light will break down anything not specifically designed for it. An exterior door should be finished with something outdoor-rated, like spar varnish. I'm not sure there's any way for you to tell by looking at it, but ...


2

I am not an electrician, but as I'm currently in the middle of some renovations myself, I was curious and did some searching. I came across "Mike Holt’s Illustrated Guide to 101 Essential NEC Rules" (that's chapter 3 in PDF form), which, in article 362, it explains that it can NOT be used for wiring systems over 600V. To me, that appears to be saying that ...


1

Agreed with the research you found. Most vinyl siding, if installed correctly, will not require caulk at the sides of the windows and doors. Often there is actually a separate vinyl piece installed first at the side of the window that the ends of the siding tuck into. You are supposed to leave a gap at the end of the siding pieces to permit expansion and ...


1

As far as I know doors don't have a weather rating - they do have a fire rating and sometimes have a rating for insulation. Since you have a varnish I am assuming you have a wood door. How well it stands up to the weather depends on how well you small porch shelters it, the outer coating, the type of wood, and if it is solid or not. If it is a solid ...


1

OSB won't be completely destroyed by water, unlike MDF or similar interior laminate materials; however, like any wood product, it will swell and shrink as it absorbs and releases water, so you should typically avoid more than casual contact with water. If you watch homebuilders putting up a typical light-frame construction home, you'll notice that the ...


1

I don't know why it might be disallowed by local codes. As mentioned in the comments to the question, this stuff is often put into poured walls and floors. It is used quite heavily for 240V wiring and phone/data wiring in Israel where almost all construction is concrete. We also used it for both 120V/240V and data in WaterShed here in the USA. As another ...


1

Although I have heard of common receptacles being described as "monkey face", the fact is that they are officially "U-Ground". Further, if you search "NEMA receptacle" you will find the ground up. When I have worked in hospitals, the customer REQUIRED the ground be up. Also, if you look at the catalogs of the various manufacturers, they are illustrated ...


1

I've been told by manufacturers that you should follow the writing on the yoke or strap but I've seen it both directions on some brands. Leviton points residential grade to the ground down and commercial and industrial grades ground up. I guess thats why GFI's have the print on the reset button go both directions. One of the main reasons for the ground ...


1

Probably the best answer for this sort of thing is to be consistent throughout the house, and be consistent with what people expect.



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