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Silicone sealant can be removed completely from many surfaces. For example tiles (but the grout can be a problem) or ceramic sinks. In these cases you can peel most of it off and scrape the rest. There is also a silicone remover product to get the residue off other surfaces. You can prevent it from sticking in the first place by lightly oiling the surface. ...


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To directly answer your question, I agree with Iggy, caulk first, then seal. My long response is going to be different however: Steps: 1) Clean excess caulk 2) Clean edges to be caulked with acetone (or if you have natural stone, methyl hydrate, or even weaker, alcohol if you have sensitive materials) 3) Allow a few moments for the cleaner to evaporate (...


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The real answer is: Don't do anything until you've identified the root cause. Find the leak. FLashing and sealant can be replaced a lot more easily than a whole new unit, not to mention the difference in cost and time. Similarly, if there's a leak where the glass (and frame) separates from the support frame as you open the skylight, address that ...


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If it's a composite roof, I think it's a little more work to roof over the skylight just because of the interior sheet rock repair, but much more expensive to buy a new skylight. You don't need to do any framing to tear out the skylight, but to do it right you should remove the sheet rock from the skylight walls, and repair the hole in the ceiling. If you ...


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Remove for sure. You can replace a skylight, throw down flashing around it, caulk it up and basically do a really good install in about 1-2 hours (not accounting demo as this is all over the place with skylights) per light. If you totally remove it you are going to have to do a lot of patchwork on the roof and a lot of shingle repair. You might have cut ...


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I would use the HRWR admixture to help seal the concrete. Alone, it might not be the best roofing solution, but it's well worth the minor cost for the extra protection. The biggest problem that I heard was foot traffic. Normally I would recommend EPDM, but I'm not so sure about foot traffic. This sounds more like a terrace, in which case, silicone cement is ...


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I would not trust admixtures to make concrete waterproof. Concrete in inherently porous and hygroscopic. Adding things to concrete still leaves it concrete with these properties. Point is it is the wiser to cover the concrete with something water proof. Waterproof materials typically will be a solid sheet of something like metal, plastic or "poly...", ...


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In terms of getting AC power to an outdoor remote wireless access point - you don't need to. Most Internet router type products run on 12 volts DC. Code compliance is much easier with low voltage wiring, and there are lots of products specifically made to distribute 12V power outdoors, typically to pathway lighting, etc.


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Be sure to use a shielded Cat5e or Cat6 cable, as Ubiquiti clearly specifies the use of shielded cable and connectors for outside access points. Conduit is not required if you use the correct type of cable. Ubiquiti would like to sell you ToughCable and connectors, but IMHO those are overpriced .vs. any other cable that meets the need (exterior and shielded)...


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Ubiquity seems to make some good equipment with good range. I don't think a few feet will make much difference especially if you close to the house while accessing the WiFi. It is questionable it will be worth the effort and cost for weatherproof Cat6 cabling or conduit on the outside of the house. Not to mention the unaesthetic appearance of cabling on ...



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