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1

Your proposed situation is not practical. You should look into solutions which will allow you to warehouse large amounts of potable water. A large bladder tank would also be a good idea because it will be able to deliver constant water pressure and it could fill up slowly throughout the day. The way a bladder tank works is that there is a rubber membrane ...


2

Your aphorism of the day: Theory and Practice are the same in Theory, but Different in Practice. As a practical matter it's going to be near-impossible to fabricate, install, and install a pump or suction pipe into a plastic-sheet-tube without poking a hole in the plastic. If you manage to succeed, you've disabled your well - if no water can get out, no ...


1

1, 2, 4 or the variant of 4 that is a raised perforated pipe; or the variant of 1 & 4 that is cutting a hole for a large filter-basket below the current floor level - but you probably don't need to "clean it every time it rains" - in all liklihood, checking it once a week or so and cleaning it as needed will suffice, with a possible need to check more in ...


0

They don't actually look that bad (at least to me from that picture) - you should be able to just sand them down, re-stain if desired, and then polyurethane / seal them again.


1

Sikaflex or similar is the standard, however that gap seems pretty thin. Is it less than 1/4"? You can get this in a self leveling format or not. My best guess would be to not have the self leveling due to not being able to insert a backer rod to prevent the caulking from dripping too deep into the gap.


0

For your second question: You just need a coarse gravel around the drain pipe or tile, not to the grade. Similar to the image provided by iLikeDirt. Ideally, drop a silt filter fabric over that; prevents small particles of dirt from slowly clogging up your pipe system. The IRC asks for 1 foot of gravel out from the wall and 6 inches from the top of the ...


1

Current state of the art is a dimpled drainage mat applied against the foundation and lapped over the footing, with a drainage pipe at the bottom to carry off water. The pipes can drain to daylight if there's enough slope on your lot, to a sump pit, or to the sewer/waste plumbing if that's legal in your location. The whole thing looks like this:


-1

Waterproofing is not important, your house is not supposed to be a boat. What you want is drainage. If drainage is good your whole foundation can be a sieve and it will still be dry as a bone. I have a foundation made out of rocks with 2-inch gaps and cracks in them everywhere and the basement is completely dry. Why? Because it is on a berm and the whole ...


2

It looks like your land sits a little lower than the adjacent roadway. It would be a cost but if you pave the first 10 ft of your driveway you can make a little berm with that pavement. Since pavement is non-porous the amount of water to overcome a couple of inches of slope would be substantial. Yet those same couple of inches will not be much to drive over. ...


0

You need to give the water a path that's more attractive (ie, lower) than your driveway. With your driveway being considerably lower than the road, it's currently the attractive path. If you only build up your driveway, you'll create a pond on the left side of the driveway since your lawn is also lower than the road. If the ultimate place the water goes ...



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