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Hm. Possible answer to my own question, synthesizing what others have said: Another option would be to frame in and close off the bottom half of the window (improving privacy and reducing splash), and replace the top half with a swinging/tilting window. Largest complication would be properly closing the outside of the house; I presume I could just install ...


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If it's an old house, it may have originally been a claw-foot tub with a full surround curtain. And the window was the ventilation. If you want to keep the window (as it sounds like you don't want to seal it off), one option would be to replace it with a vinyl window with vinyl trim. Make sure the vinyl trim is glued and sealed. That would get rid of the ...


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I was about to put a comment, but it may be too long, so I go for an answer (sorry, if it's not so good...). Aestethical solution. As the curtain is already in place, i's quite awful-looking (imho, of course). If my intention would be to leave window in place (cuz I like the idea of some fresh air or/and more light during daytime) and replace curtain with ...


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The tiles on the floor the grout the water leaks through there. The pipe also sweats, and sweating means water. The pipe is on the outside, rain and the water from roof can slide down the wall and wet the pipe, which leads inside.


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Wait, you have a DECK over metal roof that is NAILED down? You pretty much won't be able to stop leaks :/ but you can try... 1) take out all nails and use Rubber Washer screws. 2) seal each skrew and all overlaps with SOLAR SEAL 900 - you can find it online. Best thing is to use a real waterproofing material for flat roof decks - ...


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There's typically a drainage system around the inside perimeter of the basement (perimeter drain), which feeds into the sump pit. If the pump is not removing water, the drains will fill just the same as the pit. Water always finds level, so if it's above the rim of the pit, it's also filled the drains. So theoretically, water could seep in anywhere ...


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I'd suggest you get a small tub of premixed grout, a float, a sponge, and spend an hour fixing the problem. Be sure to remove any loose grout. (Something as simple as a utility knife will work for this. Wear gloves to avoid skinned knuckles.) If you want an even more durable job, score all of the existing grout along the edge of the tile (so 2 cuts per grout ...


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Carefully pull the suspect nails (or all the nails) with a small pry bar or "cat's paw" and replace with new corrugated roofing nails like these: Or, if appearance is not important, smear a big glob of roof patch over the existing nails' heads.


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It looks like your house is on a rise (assuming there is no hill hidden behind it in the picture). If that is the case then the water is probably coming in from below, which means there is a high water table there. If there are signs of moisture in the basement, it means flooding is frequent. To prevent this, you would have to build a drain all around the ...


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Without knowing what the interior drainage is now, it's not obvious that upgrading that will be of much benefit. If it's there, and water is coming through the walls, making more of it will probably not impact what's coming through the walls. If it's not actually defective/failed, replacing it seems like a probable waste of time & money. The exterior ...



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