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A bathroom should have water resistant materials in the places likely to be splashed with water. Stanard drywall is not used in those locations, but rather hardboard or cement board should have been used. If the proper materials were used in the first place, then you can just prime and paint over them. What @Ecnerwal is saying in his comment applies more ...


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Two obvious options: 1) Dry well. Give the water a place where it can flow into the ground quickly, then leach away at whatever speed the soil will permit. Basically the same principle as a septic tank, but for the unwanted groundwater. If you really want a bottom-of-foundation drain, the well has to be that much deeper; not a small project unless you have ...


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Standard pitch for piping is an 1/8" a foot. A French drain would be somewhat useless with no collector. How are you going to waterproof the basement? From the inside or out? If outside, then you're busting up that patio. Which would be good, so you can re-pitch the grade away from the house. Actually, regrading may be all that's necessary, once you fix the ...


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I was and still am in complete agreement with paperstreet's answer, buy another tub. I've never used this system. These look like a fail waiting to happen. Available from schluter.com, asked about at johnbridge.com calling them field installed flanges.


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This is clearly unacceptable and should be reinstalled.....not repaired as there is not really proper way to repair it and be as good as it was when originally installed......a piece of the material should be overlaid on the torn areas with a least one foot overlap and sealed as per manufacturers suggestion.


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I hate to give an answer that's not really an answer but I think you need to return that tub. Without a flange there's no way to guarantee that water won't migrate over and around the edge of the tub into your wall where cavity where it will fester, unseen until you have a major problem. If someone has a better, more can-do, solution I'll be the first in ...


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Spray foam might sound appealing as a quick fix, but will be a pain in the a** if you ever want to remove it! Here is an alternative solution: If you are convinced that building a small section around the old vent will work if you could make it waterproof, then try this instead: Similar to the way for building a fish tank, go out and get some thick ...


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First let's talk about your objective. If your primary objective is to keep out the water and critters, then why don't you just use some silicone over it on the inside? That will make it watertight and anything watertight is also "bugtight" (not a word I know lol). However, as the other answerers stated, the better solution will be to entirely excavate the ...



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