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26

When applied correctly, I prefer waterproofing from the outside. It keeps the water out of the concrete, rather than permeating up to the interior water proof layer. If it's allowed to freeze in the foundation, you could have cracking. In addition to water proofing the foundation, you also want a weeping tile or French drain around the foundation anywhere ...


11

Strangely enough, I have had to deal with this same problem a few times. Short of raising the garage or pouring a second higher floor, the solution is in the driveway. We had to excavate apx 6 feet of asphalt and create a gradual dip draining away from the house and garage to exit water. Obviously, they screwed up big time when the driveway was installed. ...


9

You can do all of this using weatherproof boxes and conduit especially if you are not opposed to having conduit visible. It will only require a single 3/4" hole through the wall. Supplies: 1-gang rectangular weatherproof box. round weatherproof box. 1-gang In-use cover. 3/4" PVC conduit. 3/4" male terminal adapters 3/4" PVC conduit clamps. ...


9

In addition to the other ideas suggested you may want to investigate installing a driveway drain that is a trough cut across the driveway and covered over with a grate. This way any water that comes to near the garage enters the trough and gets shunted to the side of the driveway. The shunted water can then pour into a large french drain or could be diverted ...


8

I am going to weigh in although I haven't had time to check specs etc on a couple of products I have used in the past. High moisture levels in a concrete floor can come form only two sources, insuffiecent curing time (new concrete) or ground water. The informal test you did with the plastic patch is a sure sign of excessive moisture in the floor. This means ...


7

You definitely want your footings to extend below the frost line, otherwise as the ground freezes below your footing it will swell (as water does when it freezes) and the force of the swelling WILL push your footings out of position. Ice breaks mountains - a porch doesn't stand a chance. :) Dig DEEP. With a frost line going as low as 4', I'd dig down 5. ...


7

Any Sheetrock, including green moisture resistant, is not intended for use in showers or any environment with repeated direct water contact. You can paint it , but the results will be the same, FAILURE ! Do not attempt to put tile on Drywall either. There are some new high tech backings or you can use good old fashion concrete board or hardi-backer for ...


7

I am a certified home inspector, so I am a little reluctant to answer this question. I will, however spill a few thoughts. In recent years, the tests you refer to have become fairly popular, but normally in houses that show some signs of water or mold. I personally would only recommend an infrared scan if there was suspicious water spots or paint peeling on ...


6

I would second the comments recommending a second opinion. A sump is in the basement to allow water to be drained away if it accumulates around the footings. If there's no water there it quite probably means that your water table is low enough that there's not seepage. It also would indicate that you have decent drainage around the house and rain water is ...


6

I would cover the openings with plastic sheet or some other water proof material. It doesn't have to be perfect, just enough to prevent the rain getting onto sensitive surfaces. The timbers should be treated and should be able to withstand some rain, but you don't want water getting into the walls etc. The main issue I see would be how to ensure it was ...


6

Concrete itself is not waterproof, in fact, it's more like a sponge, so concrete alone is never used to create an impermeable surface. You haven't provided much info - is the roof flat, sloped? What is already up there? There are tons of different waterproofing methods available. Going under the assumption that it was properly waterproofed at some point, ...


5

I am not an expert in this type of roofing, I do however have some questions and recommendations that may help you get the right answers. First the questions. Is this roof drained with an internal system or scuppers along the edges? How large (square footage) is this roof? What part of the country are you in? Have you consulted an industrial/commercial ...


5

Based on the pics and the amount of movement alone, I'm guessing that the foundation for this slab was not properly prepared. I'd wager that someone simply dug a squareish hole a few inches deep, put in boards for forms and poured the concrete. Looks great for a while, but doesn't do squat to avoid shifting in cold weather when the water freezes. A proper ...


5

This does not sound like it will work. If you are sure that the moisture is coming up from below, paint will not stop it, it will only seep under the paint and start making bubbles. DryLok is a good idea, but it isn't made for the type of treatment a floor gets, I don't believe it would stand up well even if you covered it with a good quality paint. I ...


5

Any sealant you put in will just have moisture build up under it and cause it to flake away after time, rot or disintegrate. The problem is that the soil has high content of moisture.. if it was not like this 5,10 years ago it is most likely it will get worse, as somewhere nearby the ground water level is rising for some reason. For most foundations on a ...


5

There is no paint-on or other surface treatment that will solve the problem. It may mitigate slightly, but under no circumstances will a surface application dry your basement enough to allow it to be finished. Any flooring will mold up pretty quickly. There are two solutions which will solve the problem: An internal solution, which is a french drain and a ...


5

If the surface is edge grain and the previous finish was only wax, wiping down with mineral spirits and then sanding using progressively finer grits up to 220 or so should be pretty good preparation to refinish. Skip the soap and water treatment as it won't dissolve any wax and only complicates finishing. Before applying any finish the wood should be ...


5

You can make watertight trays from flat sheet metal without soldering or riviting. Take a sheet of metal whose length is the length of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides; width is the width of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides. Fold the sheet so it ends up looking like this: You can fold up one side at a ...


5

Let's start by saying the tile should be replaced. It still can be replaced even though the grout has been applied. I would insist on it. There is little that can be done to repair the flawed tile, except sanding or grinding down the flaw. This would have to be done with extreme caution in order not to scratch and damage the area around the flaw. Perhaps ...


5

Based on questions answered in chat you have a case where the contractor didn't measure the deck properly, and built it too high, could not flash properly under the door frame, and performed a "some genius" move putting a transition strip (meant for interior use) over top of the door frame and the vinyl, with caulk under neath. Stupid. Two options: 1 ...


5

I would use some neoprene washers between the exterior bolt head and metal wall. Also put some silicon sealant in the hole/bolt. This will keep water out and stop bolt head from scratching the powder coating and causing rust. Should work fine.


4

In the end, I ended up using DRYLOK® LATEX CONCRETE FLOOR PAINT It's holding up well so far, we'll see how it does over the next few years.


4

Create a trough to a sump hole and put in a sump pump. It won't keep the water out, per Se, but will manage it so it doesn't get any farther than the entrance.


4

An Infrared camera can be used to look for water infiltration and damage. I would not recommended they for DIY use. They are expensive (low end models $1,000 US) and it takes a lot of training and experience to interpret the results. There may be a local IR company in your area that can assist.


4

Always. It's a shower. It needs to be waterproof. A product I've used and liked is RedGard: You install your backer board, then 'paint' this on. It's basically an adhesive roll-on rubber membrane. You then tile right on top of it. I like this better than the traditional plastic-behind-the-backer-board for two reasons 1) You can easily put holes in the ...


4

The real solution is to prevent water from escaping the pipe by finding and fixing the initial leakage. This will most likely include getting to the upstairs neighbor and kindly asking him to assist with this problem and if he doesn't want to assist bring that to the building management, authorities and the court. It will be very problematic to seal the ...


4

The concrete itself should be fine. Make sure water doesn't have anywhere it can pool, since standing water, concrete, and freezing temperatures can lead to cracking. I would protect any metal brackets or bolts intended to secure the framing to the foundation. And I would also protect any plumbing coming through the foundation. Where the water line is ...


4

It is normal to fix the leak by the vent pipe using roofing cement from the outside. It is hard to provide guidance on specific details for your case because we have not seen your vent pipe location and installation technique but here are some things to consider. There is normally a metal, plastic or rubber flashing piece that fits around the vent pipe ...


4

If I understand your issue correctly, what you're calling a french drain may actually more properly be called a drywell. A french drain pulls in groundwater and moves it somewhere else, while a drywell is a place to get rid of water underground. I think what you're talking about is something to pipe your downspouts into, and therefore I'd call it a drywell. ...



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