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There is usually a shutoff valve somewhere along the line from your hot water heater and usually at the base of each appliance or fixture. I would first make sure the values near the bath and dishwasher are both on. If not try tracking the lines from your hotwater heater to see if any values are shut off. The values near the bath may look like this: The ...


0

At hardware store I worked at we sold something called a "hammer arrester" (sp). It was a short piece of copper tube that was closed at one end; like a copper test tube.


2

There is a tool that will remove the pipe. It works on the inside of the pipe so it needs none of the pipe to grab onto. This one set may work, but this is the type I think is more reliable.


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Is it actually pipe thats left in the wall? This happened in my bathroom but it was actually just a cheap piece of PVC type plastic made to look like metal that broke off. If it is actually the cheap plastic, we cut it very carefully with a hack saw blade taken out of the actual hacksaw. The blade itself is small enough to fit in the space and we did two ...


1

Allowing for the possibility that it could be otherwise as diagnosis via internet is imperfect.... I see both a pump problem and a check valve problem here. While they may be located in the same place (if your only check valve is on the pump - which is the way mine is set up) they are not the same thing...though I also see another possibility that would do ...


1

You use a fitting called a union. It allows you to thread a nipple into the elbow, and a nipple into the tee. Then you use the union to connect the two nipples. photo courtesy of Wikipedia They are available in many sizes and materials.


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If you are bent on using threaded fittings throughout, then your only option is to disassemble from one side. With gas this is really your only option. With water, most plumbers would probably use a union or a male to soldered adapter on both ends. Push-in connectors like Shark Bites could also be used, but plumbers generally seem to dislike the in my ...


1

It is possible this was originally used for a wood fired water heater? Perhaps This would have been the precursor to the wood/pellet stoves currently in use in some parts of the country. Maybe someone wanted a fancy outhouse (or other out building) with hot water. Very odd scenario!! What to do now? It depends on how much time and money you want to ...


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Original owners planned on an outdoor cooking area on the deck. Hot water to an outside sink. A natural gas line next to it for a grill.


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A few possibilities - The pump is frozen but the motor works - The motor cannot turn the pump. With the motor off of the pump, the pump is difficult to turn. - Fix the pump 3 phase motor driven with just 2 of the legs - something is disconnected somewhere - I've had this issues with a loose/melted wire nut on a motor with large pump that had this same ...


2

This looks very similar to a pool chlorine feeder - these could use cal hypo or sodium hypo, either way you would need to know the concentration to mix and the dosing for your qty of water to treat. Not sure we'll be able to answer those questions directly. Sodium hypo - bleach - would be the cleanest option, but also will become ineffective the quickest. ...


0

Buildings (or buying) a house on a location with a lot of water is never best thing to do, but people do it and if they do it properly they never have problems. The most important question is regarding house design; are foundations and concrete slabs appropriate for this situation. Main difference is that with underground water strongest force on the slabs ...


8

You didn't indicate your location or site characteristics (slope, hillside, etc), but the location of the country, even generally could be helpful, but not required. You indicated the water bill was not high so it could not be a water leak. That would only be if the leak was after the meter. However, the leak could be before the meter and impossible to ...


1

You may want to take a look at your roof vents (stacks). There's a plastic boot around the vent that cracks over time. Rain water can leak through & travel down the pipe to the slab. If this seems likely, there's something called a Perma-boot (Home Depot, Lowes, etc.) that you can install yourself. It fits over the existing roof vent boot. Good luck!


1

That old PVC pipe is highly unlikely to be up to code for carrying a pressurized water distribution line. You also do not want to place water service outside like that because it will freeze and burst the pipes when it gets cold in winter (unless you live in an Amazon tropical zone or Hawaii). Proper installation is to install it inside near to the ...


0

In your situation, I would set up an arduino powered automatic pump. Basically, you put the water level sensor in the bucket. Once the sensor gets tripped, the arduino activates the relay, which turns on the pump. You pump until the sensor is satisfied. You can discretely run tubing from the pump to the bathtub/window/outside. No more bucket emptying! ...


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There are lots of clever ideas here, but I think they are all over-engineered. You simply need to get the water moved. Right now you are doing it manually with a bucket. I'd suggest some alternatives: Have the condensate line exit the building through the wall, extend it to ground level. This would be the simplest and cheapest route. Alternatively, you ...


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How about running the condensate line into a humidifier? You will want to get a humidifier that is ultrasonic (not "warm mist"), since you just wanted the water vaporized, not heated. Cut a small hole in the top of the tank, and run your condensate line into it. Note that since this will be outside you will want to protect it somewhat from the weather, and ...


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The solution for 100% closed cooling systems (like a refrigerator) is actually pretty elegant and simple: a pipe from the condenser coil (the part of the A/C on the "outside" that gets hot is run through a pan where water collected from the evaporator coil (the part that gets cold) sits. The fan that also cools the condenser blows over the water, which is ...


4

Set up a fan and drip the condensate into the the spinning fan blades. Have the fan blowing the water mist away from the balcony. The optimal fan to do this would be a high RPM high CFM small diameter fan. There are many IP52 water resistant computer case fans that can do this... like this one. The fan can be powered by something like this. I would use the ...


6

While you can't have it drip off the balcony, you can turn it into a fine mist and blow it off. Even a fine sprayer would work fine, but you'll need a float switch to auto-activate it, and a pump. On the plus side, this will air condition your balcony as well. Home Depot has a bucket-top misting fan that looks like it would solve your problem. You would ...


1

I'd doubt that any sort of cover-up will be satisfactory. In fact, a faux finish will likely make the problem more noticeable. I would suggest spreading the plaster out over a much larger area, maybe 3x the size, and sanding and feathering from there with a few passes of progressively finer sandpaper, otherwise your eye will always be drawn to the same spot. ...


1

It will corrode quickly. The Aluminum will break down.I recommend that you put a non-metallic barrier between the two. If you want to do it on the cheap, and If you have some Never-Seez or even some PTFE tape laying around, do it. Check it in a few months, replace the barrier, check again later. Galvanic Corrosion happens because of the different in ...


1

Aluminum and brass with an electrolyte between them (water) can still result in galvanic corrosion. Are there any plastic (PVC) fittings you could use for this application? I would choose a plastic fitting if possible.


-1

Go for it. The only thing that doesn't work well with aluminum is steel like black pipe etc. Aluminum and brass are compatible.


0

Yes, rain water is perfectly safe for drinking purpose and qualifies all WHO tests till the time it hits your rooftop where it interacts with the dirt stored there. However, still this water can be used if the first flush of water is diverted from the roof tops. It is estimated that during a storm first 10 minutes of roof top water from a CGI sheet will ...


0

So turns out the water valve in the back of my fridge was bad. All rusted out. I broke down and called a technician (thankfully) and he said we were lucky it didn't burst, as it probably would have flooded the house. On top of that, the condenser fan motor was dead. I suspect the former owner knew all of this, and just had his guy go behind the fridge and ...


0

Sloping the soil would never be a bad idea, but more important is supporting the perimeter with a proper foundation. Why do you need a slab at all? Assuming you have a reason for using a slab I would normally recommend a "floating slab" setup, but that is probably not feasible because you are placing a pre-built structure there. A floating slab would require ...


0

Capping that third copper line with a soldered copper cap in an unaccessible space should not be a problem at all if you do not need it. But I would not trust a push cap, shark bite type fitting.


0

A pressure tank system would largely resolve the issue, if correctly sized, and if the rest of the plumbing in the house was larger than 1/2". Unfortunately if the main is only 1/2, then it's likely that the rest of your house is also plumbed at 1/2", which means that even with creative placement of the pressure tank you'll still likely have the problem. ...


1

If there's a valve, then turn it off and remove the pipe. If you're concerned the valve will leak, then shutoff the water to that line, remove the valve and cap the pipe there (or replace any T's with a straight fitting). Leaving the pipe and capping the thin refrigerator line will be difficult and error prone, and you're still left with a valve and two ...



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