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2

Single versus dual stage is easy; dual stage is essentially two single-stage filters in succession. Bulkier, more expensive. Better removal of contaminants. Installation is the same. Reverse osmosis is an entirely different technology. It generally has a prefilter because RO doesn't deal with particulates, only dissolved chemicals. It does handle those ...


0

Don't install the water softener in a place that you cannot guarantee will be above freezing. If it freezes, than many internal components will be damaged. You could insulate and install an electrical heater in the shed, but it would be the first part of the house to freeze if your house looses electricity. Conversely, most water softeners use electronics ...


3

There are several independent variables to manage in a swimming pool or hot tub: pH balance halogen balance calcium hardness total dissolved solids Nearly everyone is aware of pH balance, but what most people don't seem to understand is that pH can swing wildly unless total alkalinity is increased sufficiently to provide an "inertial buffer" with total ...


2

Get ready to buy some chemicals and clean your filter. You need a chelating agent (for pools often sold as "Metal Free") to bind the metals. Adding a clarifier will help coagulate that plus the other hazy junk so they form particles large enough to get stuck in your filter.


2

This is a stunningly bad idea, IMHO. As @Comintern notes, that's a rather significant load to plop beside your house. Far simpler and safer to run your downspouts over to where your sump pump discharges, and put a basin & pump there that pumps water uphill, to your storage tanks, set somewhere uphill, so they will provide water pressure when you are ...


10

You are correct that floor drains do need to be monitored and occasionally the trap refilled with water. So the first thing to check is that your floor drain actually has a trap. The way to do that is to slowly pour water in to the drain. You should notice the water level rise and stay there. If the water disappears quickly then it's likely you don't have a ...


8

Most modern machines will self regulate the amount of water allowed to enter the washer. The typical washing machine is connected to the water supply by a hose. The hoses can fail with age. The most common use of a shut off valve like yours is to stop the flow of water when the machine is not in use. So you would open the valve allow the washing machine to ...


1

I suspect the sound is from the drain pipes, and comes from a leaky toilet, beacause that's the most common thing that has a stored reservoir of water to keep leaking after you shut off the main valve. You might try leaving the main water valve shut off for several hours. If the sound eventually stops, go around and look in your toilets to see if any are ...


2

If you are fundamentally opposed to (or trying to avoid paying taxes on) an aboveground structure, you could bury a vault to put at least a small pressure tank in. With use of a "constant pressure valve" or a variable-speed "constant pressure pump" you can get away with quite a small pressure tank (2-5 gallons) but you really can't run a pump without any ...


7

If you look at the picture below you will see pex tubing. This has become the industry norm in some areas of the US - I know some countries have adopted similar things and some haven't. The compression fittings are supposedly made to last longer than than a soldered copper joints - jury is still out on that. Let's see what complaints there are in 10-20 ...


2

The normal answer would be to install a water softener; removing dissolved minerals is exactly what they're designed for. A reverse-osmosis water filter might also do the job. I don't know whether they're available in sizes large enough to handle washing machines.


0

Dry pack it what I learned to call it. It is a regular mix of concrete, but it has just enough water added to it to get the concrete to "kick". This amount of water is so small, it is just enough to get the concrete to hold together when compressed in you hand with a strong squeeze.


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There is a concrete that I have used, and it is regular concrete, and perhaps it can have gravel in it, but the type I have installed did not use any gravel/aggregate. Dry pack is what I have learned to know it by, and stone setters use it for building walls and laying flagstone sidewalks. I have used it for shower bases over PVC liner and coated it with ...


0

Same solutions used for dehumidifiers should work: Let it drip into a tube run to somewhere appropriate (a drain, for example), or let it drip into a container that periodically pumps the water to somewhere appropriate. (My basement dehumidifier drains into the same pump that takes care of condensate from my boiler; its output hose is routed into the washing ...


1

OK, if you can't change it, and they own the A/C, and you previously agreed to the current state of affairs but are now annoyed by it, here's another idea: plant an extremely water-thirsty plant that will transpire a large amount of water every day. Then just water it with the condensate. Grass can have a high transpiration rate. Maybe you could have a ...


0

I would also offer as an alternative: a wider and flatter bucket. If you used a wide pan the evaporation rate would increase and might even be to the point of not needing to be emptied.


0

I see from your profile that you have previously asked questions about various configurations of ductless mini-split heat pumps, and that you have (or had) a Daikin model. Is this a unit you bought and installed yourself? If so, it seems that you have already violated the "no modifications" rule and presumably you could do it again to make a modification ...


2

If there really is no possibility of connecting it to a drain with its normal gravity flow, your only non-bucket option is to install a condensate pump, whose job is to raise the liquid up to a height where you can easily dump it in a drain or on the lawn or something. These are very common for basement installations of central air conditioning units where ...


0

There are usually local shut-off valves under the basin specifically for that purpose. If not, I agree that asking the building manager/owner/landlord/superintendent is the most straightforward answer.


1

1) Have a look under the kitchen sink. If OZ practice follows UK practice, this is the place in a home where you expect to find the main stopcock (regardless of whether it's the point in a home nearest the road etc). It's usually hidden behind a bottle of bleach you'd forgotten you have. Whenever I change taps I install an isolating valve under the basin ...


0

I finally went ahead and swapped out the filter cartridge. The metallic taste is gone. So, I believe that my theory was probably correct. I'm not going to try to flush out the filter cartridge; I'm just going to throw it out. So, lesson learned: when replacing a filter cartridge, make sure the inside of the filter enclosure is fully clean; don't just ...


0

Products like Dricore are a combination of a waterproof plastic structure sitting on conelike projections on the bottom and a particle board surface on the top. The plastic is in contact with the concrete subfloor. Minor wicking and seepage (less than 1/2 inch) through the concrete never reach the surface materials, but can flow to the edges or be ...


1

Concrete is porous, so as much as it allows water to seep in, it will also allow it to seep back out when the surrounding ground dries. If you are seeing so much water that opening the door allows it to run out, then I would recommend a sump pump and a perimeter drain to catch and remove the water before it gets into the basement.



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