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1

A 3/4" meter isn't going to make that big of a pressure drop, especially if the line is 1500 ft. long (which is probably why it's 1.5", which is otherwise a pretty big line for a house). The piping is most likely 1.5" just to prevent pressure loss over the long run, and then it steps down to 3/4" anyway when it goes in to the house. Having said that, it ...


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Putting any obstruction or turn in a water line will affect the flow and hence the water pressure. Not only will narrowing the line cut the pressure, but all the meter-related crap inside the device will cause massive turbulence and other flow-restricting effects. As far as legal issues are concerned, read whatever agreement you may have signed with the ...


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I understand your explanation and what to do, just not sure I want to be the one doing it or that its a good long term solution. Having worked on building houses over the years, I've done anything from framing to electrical wiring. Even hung drywall, thrown mud and done simple texturing, but that's an art I've never been good at. One thing I've never done ...


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Carefully dig it out (a garden hose may be useful for "hydro-excavating" right next to the pipe, otherwise some careful trowel and shovel work) and figure out where it does run, then you can decide what to do about it. Beware of possible other poorly buried items while you are digging (wires, etc.) Assuming you have to work with where it comes out of the ...


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Simple test: Take some clear plastic. One layer from a large sandwich bag would be ideal. Tape it securely to the wall at a spot where you're observing the problem. Make sure you seal all the way around the edge of the piece of plastic. Do this a few different places. Wait a few days. Then check the test strips. If the moisture is on the room side of ...


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Well im assuming ur under groud and concrete holds moisture and the humidity in the room Along with the florescent lights are making walls sweat or condensate. I'd purchase some very good water sealant and apply it.


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It's a little late for the OP, but it is pretty common. Here is a different explanation: Maybe the water was hiding It could be that the machine tried to pump out the water, but did not complete because the drain is blocked somewhere. Even if there was a spinn cycle later, it would not dry anything, leaving it very wet instead. If there is a pile of very ...


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The supply lines, rubber hoses to faucets are bad.


3

First guess, it's just junk from the pipes: you didn't properly bleed the system after having used a shut-off; remove aerators, run water. Next, a faucet with a sprayer has a flexible line; each end having a grommet that may have deteriorated (as with all other flexible lines). Lastly, if the valves are old enough, their packing may have deteriorated to ...


2

The unit is absolutely NOT designed to run with both elements on. This will void any warranty or safety standards of the unit. For the plumber, or anyone else, to suggest this is ok is EXTREMELY irresponsible. Besides, while running both elements will heat the water up faster, it will not likely increase volume by much. To increase the volume, you need ...


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There should be an expansion tank plumbed somewhere on the hot water line to handle the pressure fluctuations. Without this there will be potential pressure problems regardless of how the heating elements are run. With one (appropriately sized and plumbed) there will be no problems. Hot water expansion pressure is created in a system with a backflow check ...


1

Probably enough that your guests can easily see that it's not clear when their dog is looking for a convenient drinking bowl, going for the most obvious inappropriate use of toilet flushing water as potable. Alternatively (and probably requiring a bit more dye) would you notice if you were handed a glass of the stuff that it was blue, or green, not clear? I ...


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Groaning, rumbling, or other low-pitched noises from a hot water heater are typical symptoms of excessive sediment buildup in the heater; normally, flushing it via the bottom drain valve is recommended to clean out the sediment buildup. If not cleaned out, eventually the heater's lower element will burn out due to being buried in insulating sediment ...


2

This is common and not a huge problem (I will assume that the flange was correctly set using high quality plumbers putty and is not leaking). Over time, you may notice soap residue or mineral deposits on the chrome due to this. If you are concerned about that just wipe it with a towel after bathing.


2

However, after draining, there is a tiny bit of water around the flange, and I'm wondering if this is something I should be worried about. ... Will the standing water cause any problems. It is not a problem if all other aspects have been implemented correctly. Because: It's a "feature" of the geometry plus surface characteristics of the materials. ...


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"shouldn't I have seen a more substantial improvement in pressure and/or flow by upgrading to a NEW, much larger 1" dia. line?" Not if the downstream galv. pipe at the entry point to your home is in the same condition as the pipe you replaced. "does anyone think that the 3/4" meter at the street may be causing a restriction at all?" Yes, but it is ...


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The time delay between the hot water tank and the places where you use it is entirely determined by the distance between the two, which you have not changed. Note that larger tubing would be counterproductive here, because the flow is almost entirely determined by the outlet device, and you want to minimize the amount of cold water you need to drain before ...


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The whole purpose of the Woodford Model 17 faucet is to have year around use without bursting. Per their website: The freeze-less Model 17 is designed and intended for year-round residential irrigation purposes regardless of outside temperature. This faucet will not rupture from freezing when the valve is shut off and the hose is removed. The Model 17 ...


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The question I would ask is, was the shutoff value in the basement off? If the valve in the basement is shutoff it does not matter if the hose had a nozzle or not. I do not know where you are located, but if the temperature is above 45, turn it on slowly and see if it leaks, but if the shutoff valve was turned off, I think you are in good shape.


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If they are heating pipes just box them in. You shouldn't have any issues with condensation. Just be careful not to nail/screw through them.


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No, the 100 Amp breaker feeding the sub-panel is not the reason for the water heater not working. Has the heater ever made hot water, has this started recently? The 100 Amp feed is wrong for other reasons Others will likely talk about 'code violations,'but without knowing when and where your system was installed, those are just guesses at this time. If ...


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My thermostat stopped working, my electric water heater got too hot, and water boiled out of the T&P valve. I just had to replace the thermostat. Have it looked at by a plumber. So yes, this can be an intermittent thing. And yes, there could be a slow leak somewhere else. What type of WH is it? Gas, electric? Please add this answer to the bottom of ...



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