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A check valve will surely prevent water from flowing backwards, as that's exactly what it's designed to do. In case you're not familiar with them, the arrow points in the direction of flow. So whichever way you want the water to flow, point the arrow in that direction.


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I think this is a spectacular idea and a great way to save money on a project. Some advice for you though! Branch off the main line After the cutoff valve. Have the water company shut off your water at the street. Plumbers have told me that sometimes if you cut off the water using the emergency shutoff it can fail and not cut on again. Put in a cutoff ...


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Above Chicago county 5 feet deep below is 3ft '6'' in. (Twin cities included) 1/2 the post must b in -ground 6 foot posts -need 3 ft underground Make Bell shaped holes , gravel 3 in then cement


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Copper Is the best for water and healthy , using steel hard to cut and bend above that not healthy


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In general, yes, stainless steel is more corrosion resistant than copper. It forms a tightly bonded oxide coating which tends to prevent further corrosion. If replumbing a house where copper pipes corroded (this is more prone to happen in some areas than others due to water chemistry differences) my first instinct at this point would be to use PEX plastic ...


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I do not have a well, and not a water expert, but I have a recurring water leak problem and thought I'd share my experience in case it helps. I recently experienced a problem similar to what you described - water kept running but nothing I could touch was leaking. I could hear water running (high pitch sound), but could not locate the leak. I finally ...


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Oops, I think I misunderstood the question. It sounds like this is a "frostproof" spigot. If so, there should be a small white plastic cap on the top of the spigot just behind the knob. A picture would ensure that a proper identification is made. Most of these spigots can be rebuilt. However, it may be more efficient (time wise) to replace it (depending ...


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We solved this problem by installing a small reverse osmosis filter for the ice maker as well as for cooking and drinking. Such a filter will soften the water without adding any chemicals at all. The only downside to this is expense. You will have to periodically change filter cartridges. That isn't outrageously expensive, but certainly more than salt. ...


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I suspect the water level is set too high, so it's not emptying fully. I'd try adjusting the fluidmaster fill valve (the black thing on the left) Here is a link to a troubleshooting guide for that toilet, check the poor or sluggish flush sections. http://www.watermatrix.com/proficiency/pdf/resources/Proficiency-Troubleshooting-Guide.pdf Those fluidmaster ...


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Yes, no reason this can't work, within the limits of the pressure tank (alternate name for "bladder accumulator" not that there is anything incorrect about that term - suspect it's regional differences in terms.) The one on my well pump system stores ~30 liters of water, but they come in many sizes and can be combined, so you should be able to store as much ...


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Normal domestic water diaphragm accumulators (usually bladder accumulators are used) would not be feasible as they are used with a pump that cuts off when max tank pressure is reached. When you say "use them as a water source" please give an idea of estimated capacity needed at what pressure. Perhaps you should be using a simple raised atmospheric ...


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A piston pump compared to a plunger pump, from Wikipedia. The parts you specified from your picture are piston pumps. A piston pump is a type of positive displacement pump where the high-pressure seal reciprocates with the piston.1 Piston pumps can be used to move liquids or compress gases.


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After enough research and talking with a few different companies, this is what I have found out. Water Softener - this is good for removing Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, etc out of the water. It mainly used for getting a small degree of minerals out of the water. Using it primarily for high iron removal will decrease the life of the softener. Chlorination - ...


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First confirm that the problem is at the valves and not a clogged faucet screen. Backing-up the valve with an adjustable wrench you could turn your knobs with channel locks but be prepared for a few drips, or something completely catastrophic to happen. Not something to be messing with on a Saturday evening. Being frank, those valves are crap. Preferably ...



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