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1

You need a brass connector. "1/2" female iron pipe" (1/2" FIP) is the size of the female connector on the end of the hose coming out of the sink plate in your picture; "3/8" female compression" is the size of the connector on the end of the hose coming out of the faucet in your picture. You need a 1/2" MIP (male iron pipe) X 3/8" male compression adapter. ...


0

If those were crimped-on end-caps you'd have to cut them off - but they look like "sharkbite" fittings, which can be removed. If you lack the special tool, close an adjustable wrench down to the size of the pipe, and use it to push the tan collar into the fitting. Search for "sharkbite adjustable wrench trick" or "how to remove a sharkbite" if that's ...


1

Quarter-turn ball-valves are designed to be entirely on or entirely off. The aperture at intermediate positions does not vary linearly with handle position. There are two major types of ball-valve, standard and full-bore. A full-bore ball-valve is pretty much designed to give you either no-flow or full unrestricted flow. Ball valves are not intended to ...


3

The ball valve offers a straight through path for the water. It's bore hole is highly likely to be smaller than the feed pipe behind it so the bore acts like a hose nozzle. The older style faucets have a complex path flow for the water through the device which causes turbulence in the flow and also a pressure drop. This is what makes it look to you that ...


0

It looks like the unit has been damaged on installation, likely heat damage. The product is plastic so heat is going to cause a problem. It does state this in the instructions. Follow the instructions in the box and you won't go wrong. DO NOT subject the unit to direct heat, chemicals or other corrosive materials.


1

I believe it will fill in. My house had a 4" PVC pipe from the foundation to the septic tank, about 10 to 15 feet away. Apparently, a plumber was out probing for the pipe with a steel rod (standard tool for this), and pierced the pipe without realizing it. The pipe eventually filled in, and I had a whole lot of digging to do to fix it.


1

I will potentially be drinking the same water that flows back in the well after the frostless hydrant is shut off - yes? No. Freezeless faucets drain their water back into the ground at their base below the frost line when turned off, NOT IN TO THE SUPPLY. The freezeless facuet drains this water so the pipes above the frost line have no water to ...


3

Most of the on demand water heaters require at least 20 psi for operation. Pressure in a propane tank, large or small, can range between 100 and 200 psi. I am assuming that a device that requires ~30 psi (which is a common size for preset propane regulators coincidentally) would not be engineered to withstand constant 200 psi pressure. Yes, you need a ...


0

Have you checked your gutters. Every time I end up with water in my basement it is the result of some issue with my gutters. I have a lot of old trees around my house and during certain times of the year it is impossible to keep them clean (I know I need guards). If they back up the water pours over the sides and then builds up near the basement walls and ...


0

Do you have a sump pump? If so it may be because the sump pump is not functioning properly and not pumping the water from your foundation out, which leads to water seeping onto your floor.


0

This has happened to my pool many times too. It's the metal particles in the water reacting with chlorine indeed. I use aluminum sulfate, which you can buy in any pool shop in bags of ~20 kg. Just sprinkle evenly before night, depending of the size of your pool. It will react with metal particles and form a sort of dust, which will fall to the bottom of the ...


1

JBweld's WaterWeld epoxy works wet, and can be used for potable water tanks. http://www.jbweld.com/products/waterweld-epoxy-putty


0

I'm in New Zealand- here, usually the main is the only valve between any outlet and the distribution network / mains. Unless there was some other valve as well, if you turned off the main valve and flow stopped, then the main valve is 99%+* liable to be the problem. However - is there any chance that the shutoff valves under your sink also serve the rest ...


1

I would count on main valve - it cound just broke. I had similiar situation last year, but in my case it was that i couldn't close the main valve. If every output - even the ones that You didn't touch - gives same response (little or no pressure), it is highly probable that main valve broke down. I would suggest calling city plumbers (as this is main ...


2

As long as there's enough room, and everything has adequate space around it, there shouldn't be a problem. Without knowing more about the space (e.g. dimensions, and layout of the equipment), it's difficult to provide any more detail.


-2

I solved the problem with old school washer and dyer. No smell, no washer cleaning cycle, and no 2hour cylces. I lost a ton of money, ouch. lesson learned.. but my clothes don't stink any more. Old school FTW



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