New answers tagged

1

I am guessing that is a small pressure tank (blue thing top of photo). The answer is yes yo can hook up a garden hose. I would add a valve so if the hose springs a leak you can turn it off. The next bit of good news it looks like you have 2 ports on the pressure side (top pipe right) if they unscrew add a hose bib and you can water all you want.


1

Definitely. It looks like you can even go off one of the Tees already conveniently installed. You'll need an adapter which will depend on the hose, but very simple to install.


3

what might the cause be? The connector isn't tight, so the pivot assembly is loose, so water can work past the seals. It was assembled with dirt in the seals A seal has failed or is damaged Something else. Can water still be reaching the pivot rod itself? Yes. I would disassemble, clean and inspect. replace any worn or damaged parts - ...


1

You really are not supposed to divert rain/stormwater into the municipal sewers. It costs the city a lot of money to treat that water. The right tool for this job is a pool cover pump. You can then pump the water wherever you want (a dry well, storm drain, or even just into your yard if the quantity is not too great).


0

The cause of the seepage is that the system is simply being overwhelmed. During a heavy rain, your dry-well fills quickly, as the downspouts are fed into it. If they didn't feed into there, you'd stand half a chance of the drain system doing what it's supposed to: drain those wells (as opposed to filling them). Those rocks, with their proximity to the (...


1

It may not seem intuitive to do this, but not to would be irrational. Temporally secure the hose to something so that it can't fall out of the sink, and go to lunch. Sticking it as far as it will go into a (known working) floor drain would be even better. I've been doing some work in my basement lately. Step one of every morning, is hosing off the 100 years ...


0

If you care to do it on your own I have personally had a good experience with using the First Alert Drinking Water Test Kit. This kit provides levels of: E.coli, lead, pesticides, nitrates, chlorine, hardness, and pH. Considering what is happening to your hair and your ice, I wouldn't bother testing it unless you need proof in numbers. Safe Drinking Water ...


1

Turn off the main supply and connect the supply line(s) to the faucet. You will need a brass tee, crimps, and the connector for the pipe to the faucet, and some pipe. If you want to use a silcock instead of a sink, you still need to attach it to something. I would start there (build something to hold the silcock), and attach the pipe to it once I figured ...


0

There are two many questions in this to do a good job of answering so I will tackel the most important one. I would build a French drain from above the house along the property line (the higher up the property you can afford to go and at least 3' deep). The depth will help pull all the water both surface and topsoil water movement. if you also have water ...


0

That's a typical monobloc tap (faucet) with a C-shaped washer and a retaining nut. You can cheaply buy special long tubular wrenches specifically designed for this job. Double ended - fits four different sizes. The connecting hoses usually have a small thread at the tap end with a rubber o-ring. They can often be unscrewed by hand once the lower end is ...


1

I am an amateur but it looks to me like it just needs an O ring and new plastic ring like the video below shows. under kitchen sink diagram http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/how-to-repair-a-spray-hose-1.jpg looks like it needs an "O" ring and silicone grease. http://citykitchensseattle.com/tag/kitchen-faucets-leaking-at-base I had no experience at all and ...


0

It's quite possible that some other unit is draining into the same pipe. Typically water sounds are generated only in the drain pipes, because the inlets are systolic (i.e. always at peak pressure). Since at least so far nobody's reported leaks or water damage, my uneducated guess is that some faucet or toilet valve gave out, and there's constant water flow ...


1

It has not been winterized properly. Enersol FAQs have some great tips regarding "removable end-caps on the roof" that need to be opened. EnerSol FAQs


0

Granular activated carbon can remove radon from water. As to that specific filter, you would need to check with the manufacturer or consult the packaging/instructions. http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/water/drinking-water/water-testing/pollutants/reducing-radon-in-drinking-water


0

Replacing it is the only viable option. You can buy a piece of pex and two push-on connectors for about $30 at your local home improvement store. The only tools you'll need are too cut the copper out and the pex to length - no tools needed for the connectors.


3

Based on your picture: Copper pipe in concrete; a problem. Copper pipe connected to galvanized iron pipe (evidently) without a dielectric union; a problem. Electrical ground connected to the galvanized iron pipe, not the copper pipe; likely also a problem, and would be a problem for the grounding if there was a dielectric union. It is just possible that ...


0

James most of the Sinks and toilets in your home have 3/8 plumbing many homes are plumbed with 1/2 pipe through the entire house. The places you will see a pressure drop is usually hose bibs, showers and most kitchen faucets have water saving restrictors built into them. It all comes down to how many faucets will you have going at the same time and the size ...


0

Granite can be removed without it being damaged in 90% of all cases. We would need to see pictures before helping out with that. If granite is installed right it should be held in pace by a couple of wood blocks underneath in the corners - ensuring it can be moved if there is work that needs to be done. If it is install like this it literally takes a few ...


0

Double 2x8's spanning 10' @ 16" O.C. can barely support 160 PSF (safely) if they are douglas fir and the spa is centered on the joist. 150 PSF over ~50 Sq. Ft. would be about 7,500 lb. As for your end beams, (3) 2x10's spanning 7' would support the weight of the joist ends with a 1.5 sq. ft. footing on each end of the beams; 4 total. Just to stiffen ...


0

IMO I would use something more robust like copper, galvanized, or brass from the meter to the shut off if exposed at all. Then use PEX after the shutoff. Just know PEX is not designed to be left exposed to UV light like the sun or physical abuse of any kind. If receives much of either, I would use another material or get it covered up. On that note, we ...


1

Even though you are not drinking this water, you are using it for showers and for washing dishes - so it probably needs to be treated nearly as seriously as drinking water. The main methods are filtration, treatment with floculants, thermal treatment and chlorination. Chlorination is a widely used method. Chlorine is present in most disinfected drinking-...


2

You should treat it like a (small) swimming pool. Maintain the free available chlorine (FAC) level between 1 - 3 parts per million (PPM). PPM is basically the same as milligrams per liter. So for 8000 liters you need 8 - 24 grams of chlorine. I would use calcium hypochorite powder/granules, which is commonly 65% Ca(ClO)2 by weight; so you will need 12.3 - 36....


0

You either dissemble it from its closest union, or start cutting. If it leads to a pump, I'd advise installing unions at both ends of it, to facilitate replacements. Simply tightening this pipe probably isn't the way to go. It's likely deteriorated at the threads and that's why it's leaking. You'll risk snapping it off in the fitting to get it watertight ...


3

Besides the suggestions above some things you might try: Oxygenation: a small pump set up in the tank pumping the water into the air gap above water float level you have or an air pump pumping air into the water might help with some of the issues. The pump can be placed on a timer to cut down the electrical expense. Refreshing the water on a regular basis. ...


1

A lot depends upon whether you live where it can freeze. If you do then you want to bury the pipe from the house to the stock tank in the ground at a depth sufficient to prevent freezing. Then you want to use a frost-free farm or yard hydrant type valve to join with the buried water line and bring the water service up to the working level above the ground. ...


1

Turn off your house main, while fixing this. It would behoove you to plan this when no other household members need water. And prepare to do it quickly. I recently had a similar problem, but my house shutoffs didn't work either. I had to call a plumber, who called the town, and shut off the water to my house at the street, while the plumber replaced both ...


1

Since this is for a "not for drinking", unfiltered, untreated, non-potable water storage tank. It seems your goal is just to reduce the levels of bacteria/fungi/algae in the water. If you can get the interior water temperature over 50 deg C, you start killing off the stuff living in the water. With 40 deg C in the shade, it sounds like you have lots of ...



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