New answers tagged

0

If the subsurface is well-drained, there should be no surface water. You can fix the problem by installing draining tiles under the patio. Are you a Caymanian?


2

To achieve the maximum flow keep your pump at ground level. With a 1/2" slightly pressurized intake it may help to put 3/4" out put to the water tank but much larger would probably be a waste of $. Make sure to have water in the pump at all times the shaft seals are usually ceramic with no water they overheat and crack. This would be another reason to keep ...


7

As long as the attached timer is shut off and no water is flowing the pressure in the water line will be no different than what it would be when the spigot is turned off. You water bill will reflect how much water that you actually use. The only way it could go up astronomically would be if the timer broke off the spigot or failed in an open mode where ...


0

Rain water has (practically) no electrolytes. We've all heard that rainwater is acidic, but realistically, that is only relevant on a larger, ecological scale (tons of slightly acidic water will cause erosion). More importantly, rainwater will contain nitrates, oils, and other organic chemicals, and rainwater will contain lots of microorganisms, which will ...


0

Modifications to the flue are likely to be unwise and may be counterproductive or cause your heater to be dangerous or fail any safety checks. There are fairly strict back pressure requirements for proper function. Even some models from 20 years ago recaptured some of the waste heat into the incoming air (concentric balanced flue).


0

Your question is fairly broad without device information, but the theory is sound. You essentially pressurize your home with dry dehumidifier exhaust to expel humid interior air. This depends, of course, on your home not being perfectly sealed. This isn't a problem as no home is. The challenge will be ducting the air into your home in such a way as to not ...


5

It is generally not worth the time and money to try to capture the lost heat through the exhaust system of the vast majority of tankless/on-demand water heaters. The heaters are now so efficient that they can vent the exhaust through plastic (PVC) pipe. Since these heaters also only operate when there is a call for hot water, they do not run very often. ...


2

Could the melting ice water have caused a permanent leak to have developed? (my emphasis) Leaks generally don't repair themselves. Since there is evidence of a leak, it is very likely this will recur. This means that the leak needs to be actively investigated and fixed to prevent further damage. You downstairs neighbor will probably get someone to ...


-2

the ice froze some water standing in the pipes and that created a clot, so when more water came through the pipes, it overflowed (overflew??)


3

could be the cold has shrunk something, maybe rubber isolation, and the water was able to go around it (something like that caused the challenger explosion) could be the cold has cooled down the neighbours ceiling and the moisture in the room condensed there, like when you use air conditioning


1

Here in the UK one would normally use a compression repair coupler to repair a copper water pipe. Normally because it's burst but it would work just as well after removing that (presumablly) redundant and leaky valve. The repair coupler is longer than a normal coupler and only one end has a depth stop which makes it easy to slide onto a gap in existing ...


0

"1/4 turn ball valves have plastic seals at each side of the ball with a hole in it. Many times the valve can be tightened (not the stem) but the end that threads into the body to tighten them up and stop the leak. Not all are built this way but most metal ones are. when you removed the fitting it may have loosened causing the leak." I agreed with this. ...


3

There are basically two solutions: 1. Remove the saddle valve and replace with a coupling You need to do this if it is leaking from the rubber flashing around the pipe. 2. Cap the Valve You can unscrew the valve stem retaining nut and cap the top and side of the valve with compression nuts as described above. You can do this if, for instance, the valve ...


5

There were some good suggestions to replace/remove the saddle valve, and I'll likely do that eventually. For now, though, I was able to cap it off with a 1/4" compression cap, similar to the one pictured below.


2

If you remove that, water is going to spray everywhere. You might be able to find a cap to screw onto it at the local hardware store. If it's at the end of the pipe you can easily fix it by: Turning off the water Purchase a pipe cutter (sort of looks like the letter C) and costs about $16.00 USD Purchase a 3/4" or 1/2" Shark bite connector. Around $5.00 ...


6

It's a self-piercing saddle valve like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB76LXrYKsU . If you're familiar with electronics, it works a lot like the so-called "vampire tap" for coax cable. Regardless, it's a quick and easy solution in the short-term, but they tend not to last. Because they are cheap, they tend to fail easily, and because they are ...


10

Turn the water off, and remove it. Those things are rubbish, and always leak eventually. If you need a valve there, cut out the damaged section of pipe, and install a proper tee and valve. If you don't need it, cut out the damaged section of pipe and install a coupling. If you're not an expert solderer, They make push-fit fittings (SharkBite® is the well ...


3

It's a self tapping valve, usually to provide water to a fridge. You can either replace it or eliminate it (use a coupling instead).


0

Get a pipe cap. This is normal with shut-off valves that are not exercised for many years. You only really need it to slow down flow enough to change and tighten the connecting piping. Sometimes that's all you can hope for. That said, we've been on a campaign to replace every one in the facility, but it's almost futile - we'll have the same problem again ...


0

After you try Iggy's answer to clear the pipes, if you still have a problem, I would suspect the pressure balancing valve is malfunctioning. That is why only the tub is having this problem. You would then have to disassemble the shower/tub valve and at least clean it. You may need to replace parts of it. Good luck!


0

Municipal water meters are positive displacement meters as they are the most accurate at low and high flow rates. If the supply is shut off for a prolonged period of time (several hours) it is likely that water in the pipes will be drained by consumers trying to get as much water from the supply as they can. The result is air filled pipes. When the supply is ...


0

I've experienced symptoms similar to this in the past, and the culprit turned out to be a failing pressure reducing valve. It wasn't holding back the high water pressure from the municipality so high water pressure could be measured inside the house. Look for a bell shaped object after your main water shutoff. Replacing this valve, and also adding an ...


-1

Normally you associate a bang in the pipe due to water hammer but that occurs on faucet turn off, however if the temperature in the heater gets high enough to create steam the steam will locate at the top of the tank so when you turn on the hot water faucet the steam then enters the line and can make a noise so first thing to do is run the hot water at a ...


0

For the short term, go buy, borrow or steal a shop-vac before the pipes burst. And stop trying to burn your house down with a hair dryer. Until you fix this long term, always leave the cold water tap on the faucet running just a tiny bit during the winter.


-4

Try wet switch flood detector http://www.amazon.com/DiversiTech-WS-1-Switch-Flood-Detector/dp/B004JPDO8W


2

Not sure about inside, maybe damp rid or a dehumidifier. I don't suppose it wouldn't hurt to pack concrete in that gap under the wall/foundation (but you should dig this out from outside first). The truth is, water coming in must be taken care of from the outside. A picture of the outside might be helpful. I understand that you are on bedrock, but just to ...


-3

if you toliet water is hot then yes its hooked up backwards


3

The diverter valve built into your faucet is downstream from the faucet valve that is designed to hold back "line" pressure. The diverter shunts water toward the spray head when you open the spray head valve, and directs it toward the fixed spout otherwise. The faucet sprayer head/nozzle is not designed to hold back system pressure. They would have to be ...


4

You can use an automatic air vent for the water supply. It has a air chamber and a float that will automatically bleed the accumulated air. They are also relatively inexpensive. The automatic air vent is commonly used for for hydronic water heating systems but make sure its approved for potable water in your case. This Honeywell EA122A1028 should work. ...


0

Yes. Depending on your membranes gpm rating the flow is relativly slow also the reject side will be faster depending on its rejection ratio. Most are 8 to 1. Good nembranes will be high gpd with a 2 to 1 ratio Also these flow rates are if you dripped the product into a barrel. When you start adding back pressure. Like filling you tank. When it's half ...


0

Sounds like there is too much air in the tank. Or he bladder is actually broken in the tank. Depending on where the valve stem is you can check by removing the valve core and seeing if water come out of where the air should be. Meaning you have to replace the tank. Or add air to the tank with a nearby faucet open and if possible close all valves leading ...



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