Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

A battery backup sump pump is a device with a very limited scope of benefits - for a short power outage, the capacity of the sump itself will be adequate until power comes on again. For some particular scope of power outage and water flow a battery backup that's actually working well will keep you dry, and then for longer power outages or higher water flows ...


1

The curb stop and the portion of pipe between the valve and your house should have been buried below the frost line for your location. There may be some freezing in the portion that is inside your house, but if you only have a short run and you leave the valves in your house open, the ice can push along inside the pipe.


0

If your well recovery rate is too low (how quickly water refills the well bore from the surrounding rock), the pump may turn off to prevent damage from overheating (and even if it kept running, it wouldn't pull up much water). As wells age, their recovery rate goes down, and the recovery rate is affected by variation in water table levels.


0

As an alternative option, you can use Potassium Chloride instead of salt in your softener. (On a side note, by my math two liters should only have under half a gram of sodium at that hardness)


3

This may be late, but you could use something like this bottled water dispensing pump system.


1

[It's very probably measured on high] edit - nope there's an average of sorts - if you'd like a very tedious read, the (US) government procedure is here, at least for some point in time. Beware, it's govenmentese...CFR-2011-title10-vol3-part430-subpartB-appJ1 It takes considerably more than two tubs of water to wash and rinse. Rinses may be multiple, and ...


2

There should be no permanent cosmetic damage unless you have something seriously wrong with your liner (in which case the damage is already done). Replacing water is very rarely the solution for algae. In practice you can just leave it until next season. Of course make sure it's winterized — i.e., if you're in a freeze zone ensure all lines, pumps, ...


0

I ended up pouring some very liquid mix of waterproof cement down the pipe and catching it again at the exit, it seems that is filled the little cracks inside the pipe. It's been a few weeks of testing by pouring water down and I don't see any leaks anymore. I have to specify that the pipe was horizontal and the cracks on the bottom part of it, that allowed ...


0

Based on size, location above the baseboard and distance from the wall and the fact that it is a screw-on cap, I'd guess gas.


0

It goes by many different commercial names, but the generic terms is "Permious" or "Pervious" concrete. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pervious_concrete


1

There may also be an issue with the wiring above the ceiling; the copper may have oxidized, causing gradually poorer contact between two conductors. first up: try changing at least one light bulb. As you remove the old bulb, twist it several times back & forth at the "nearly tight" position to help rub the contacts clean, and do the same with the new ...


0

Try to scrape/sand away the paint to see what material you find. As mentioned in @Pigrew's answer it could be black iron steel, galvanized steel, or brass. However, it's hard to tell by the photo if it is a threaded cap or not. If it's not threaded it could be copper, which is used for both water and gas. And for the sake of completeness, it could also be ...


4

Short of opening up the end-cap, there isn't a good way to tell which it is. You could try banging/hitting a pipe elsewhere in the house, to see if you can hear the banging. Also, look at other exposed piping to see what materials were used for the various utilities. Pipe like that could be water, but it also could be oil or natural gas. There is a chance ...


1

The first order of business is to find out where the frost line is in your area. The second is to dig a trench 6 to 12 inches deeper than the frost line from the immediate vicinity of an outdoor frostproof faucet (a frostproof hose bibb at the house sill is ideal) to the pasture. The house end of the trench should be pretty well squared off. You can get ABS ...


0

You should contact your local government, as codes and laws vary from place to place. The Uniform Plumbing Code, says that there should be valves for every fixture in the unit. Uniform Plumbing Code 2012 Chapter 6 Water Supply and Distribution Section 606 Valves 606.3 In multidwelling units, one or more shutoff valves shall be provided in ...



Top 50 recent answers are included