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53

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


7

This is caused by: poor roof design poor gutter installation Since it's not cheap to fix the roof, the solution is to fix the gutters. You simply need larger and/or repositioned gutters. The catch is if you also have heavy snow loads. In that case, you also need strong, well-installed gutters. :) In this case, since it's really only one spot, I'd ...


7

Could you turn the end of the downspout 45-90 degrees so the water exits across the roof slope, rather than down it? This would help distribute the downspout flow across more roof area. Not sure if that's a standard approach, but it seems quick and easy to try, and easy to undo if it doesn't work


5

Were it me, I'd consider a 'janky' looking roof much better than premature shingle failure due to overload. Run a section of downspout across your roof and dump it into the existing gutter, angled in the direction of flow, so that the water doesn't splash into the gutter at a 90 degree angle, but joins water already headed for the downspout.


4

Step one - look. Lead is unlikely inside the house, but you might see a lead pipe coming in from the street, if there is one. Copper pipes soldered with tin/lead solder are pretty common. But so are threaded galvanized iron pipes. Step two - ask the water supplier, if it's on a municipal system. Step three - have the water tested - it won't tell you if ...


4

In my experience tree roots have damaged foundations. The roots penetrate the smallest cracks and if they don't open it up wider, it still allows more water to enter than what the foundation should be designed to keep out. When roots grow, and they will the displace dirt, and the dirt will go somewhere. At times it is the wall that give under the pressure. ...


4

NO this plan has no merit, spraying the borax water solution in a hole would only get some, if any of the mold and you would be guesting anyway. If your house was on fire would you drill holes in the walls and spray water at the holes and hope? The only way to check for mold is to open up the wall and testing spots that look suspicious.(If you really think ...


4

Just to add some visuals to the others' explanations using your photo, you need to (1) push on the collar trying to move it parallel to the tube, and (2) pull the tube. To reconnect, push the tube into the collar until it stops (should be about 1 inch). Make sure the tube end is square (perpendicular to the tube axis, with no damage); cut a bit of the tube ...


4

This is polypropylene, but the connectors are very similar to PEX quick-connect fittings. You need to push the protruding collar (the inner tube that the polypropylene is secured into) back inside the connector, and you have to apply the pressure to that collar evenly. You might be able to do that if you're gentle enough with a pair of pliers with the jaws ...


2

This is what I call a "push to connect" fitting. They are put together by pushing the tube into the fitting. They are released by pushing the small collar into the fitting and then pulling out the tube. Sometimes they are slightly stuck, and may take a little bit more force to pull out the tube, but it should be if if the plastic collar is first pushed into ...


2

Very odd, but here's a thought on how to troubleshoot. Shut off water pressure into your water heater. Test each one of your hot water taps. If any of them work, something is mixing cold water into your hot water pipes. Some one-handle faucet and shower fixtures can do this if their internal seals are worn out. Find it and fix it. If they all only work when ...


2

Because it was built in 1940... I'm sort of kidding. :-) Still, there's a fair chance there's some lead either in the house or more likely in the supply line coming into the house. Metal shortages during WWII did lead to various substitutes. There was a lot of steel/iron pipe in use then, except that iron became very valuable in the America's for the war ...


1

As other's have mentioned in comments, having the walkway sloped properly may reduce the problem. However, if the area between the walkway and the house is lower than the walkway, you'll still likely end up with water trapped there. The most common solution to this problem, is to build up the land between the walkway and house. Most folks us the area as a ...


1

No other fixtures are "dependent" on the shower valve. What may be happening is what is called "crossover", hot water crossing over into the cold water line (or vise-versa) due to a defective single-handle mixing control. It sounds like your plumber may have been right, as this would tend to not have a noticeable effect when the shower is flowing. When the ...


1

In order to use propane, the appliance needs to be converted, and you will need a regulator: By default, most gas-fueled appliances are sold configured for natural gas (methane) and NOT propane. Because of the chemical differences, propane requires a different ratio of fuel to air in order to burn properly. This is accomplished by changing the fuel nozzle ...


1

To fix the damage, pry any loose material free, patch with compound, sand, and prime/paint with a paint designed for wet areas (preferably mold/mildew-resistant too). To prevent this from happening again, you'll need to improve ventilation in the area. It's a little hard to tell from these photos, but this looks like a corner within your shower where warm ...


1

I don't have enough rep to comment, so in the form of an answer: I fully agree with Tester101. You need to protect the lower roof from a large flow of water in a narrow space and incorporate the elbow at the end to bring it into the gutter. I have a copper tile roof and did something similar to protect it. The differences in my approach were: I used an ...


1

I had a similar problem caused by the lower gutter being overhung by the roof too much. There was only actually about 1/3 of the gutter 'visible' for rain from the roof to fall into. It was resolved by repositioning the guttering. (In our case that was relatively trivial as the guttering was mounted on extendible brackets fitted to the rafter feet).



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