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22

It might be slightly more economical, but it also might be slightly worse for your health. Hot water dissolves plumbing (pipes, valves, fixtures, etc.) much faster, and what it dissolves is in the water. Lead is specifically of concern, particularly with homes prior to 1986 and with infants. There's a NY Times article that sums it up nicely with sources.


15

Economically, the difference is irrelevant. Let's say you need to boil one liter of water. The specific heat of water is about 4.2 joule per gram degree Celsius. Meaning, for every gram of water that we want to make hotter by one °C, we must supply one joule of energy. A liter is 1000 grams, and let's say the cold water starts at 15°C, and we want to go to ...


9

Economically, yes it costs less to start with hot water. However, you should use cold water anytime you need potable water. Hot water tanks are generally pretty filthy. If you were to drain your tank, you would probably be disgusted to see what comes out. Cleaning your hot water tank is something that every home owner should do, but very few do. Also, ...


5

If you already have hot water, that you have paid to have heated, and which you would otherwise not use, you will gain time and money by using it. The amount gained is likely to be very small.


4

Short of opening up the end-cap, there isn't a good way to tell which it is. You could try banging/hitting a pipe elsewhere in the house, to see if you can hear the banging. Also, look at other exposed piping to see what materials were used for the various utilities. Pipe like that could be water, but it also could be oil or natural gas. The pipe could be ...


3

If that water softener has a shutoff valve (it should, for service purposes), your task is simple - shut off the softener and test each sillcock. If you still get water, it's hard water. If not, you may get a very small flow for a moment (until the plumbing is all depressurized) but it'll stop quickly. If it does NOT have a shutoff valve, one should really ...


3

Looking at your second photo, I'd say that the top spigot is soft and the bottom is hard. The bottom is directly connected to the water main, coming up through the concrete, through the pressure regulator (the bell-shaped object) and thus, is connected before the softener. There is no way to tell from the photos what is coming from the back-yard spigot. ...


3

The water heater is significantly more efficient than the stove, with 50-90% efficiency for the heater vs around 40% for the stove. So we have a clear winner, right? Not so fast. There is one key detail missing from the rest of the answers: the distance from the water heater to the sink. You could turn the faucet on and wait until the water was hot, or ...


3

The bigger question is: is your house being heated or cooled? If your house is being heated, any inefficiency just becomes heat for your house and is not wasted. If you are cooling your house, all inefficiencies become an additional load for your air conditioner. PaulO


2

What diameter? From here it looks like a vent for a drywell or French drain. If it's about 4" (10cm) diameter, that'd add to my suspicion.


2

The simple answer to your question is yes - it is more economical to start off using hot water to accelerate the boil. As for the other points raised: yes, the water from the hot water tank is best not consumed, but if you are boiling it further I would say that is not much of a concern. yes, the cost saving is not much, but I say if you want to save, ...


2

Is the main valve a gate valve? If so, you'll probably have to replace it. These types of values often fail when not used for a long time, and either won't close or won't open again after being closed. You may be able to repair the valve, but you'll have to shut the water off to do that, so you might as well just replace it with a new valve. If fact, you ...


2

It is common to set washing machines in a washing machine pan These can handle minor leaks. Some versions include connections for floor drains that handle larger leaks. Many apartment buildings that allow above basement washers require that a built in pan be an integral part of the floor and sometimes specify a deeper pan than the 2" versions.


2

For the most part valves have issues with either the seal or collecting gunk near the closing mechanism. The older ones - 60s-mid 80s - seem to have a pretty high failure rate with their seals. I have not run into any specific issues with 90s built homes. But the fact is if one of your valves is having a problem then all/most will. If it is the same ...


2

I think the answer to your question is "all of the above". Yes some valves are made better than others. Some types (ball versus globe valve) are better than others. The installation process might have affected them as could how frequently they are used. Certain elements in your water might also be a factor. If you don't want to solder a lot or call a ...


1

The first order of business is to find out where the frost line is in your area. The second is to dig a trench 6 to 12 inches deeper than the frost line from the immediate vicinity of an outdoor frostproof faucet (a frostproof hose bibb at the house sill is ideal) to the pasture. The house end of the trench should be pretty well squared off. You can get ABS ...


1

From what I have seen of laminate and time passing, you might want to consider the "ceramic tile hardwood" (seen at at least one if not both flavors of US home improvement stores recently) for the area around the laundry; or just let it be different. Real life exposure to water is not generally harmless to laminate, whatever the sales-folk may tell you. Once ...


1

The floor should be resistant to water, however this is more of a cleaning requirement: you want to be able to cleanup any spills of soap on the floor. Engineered wood floors would meet this requirement. As @bib mentions, there are drain pans available to place under your machine to catch any leaking water. However, periodically looking under you machine ...


1

There are a lot of buildings that have this situation where people may be condo or townhouse owners. The normal thing to do in your situation would be to upgrade your shut-off valve. Maybe even install another one right before/after your first opening on the mainline.


1

I only use hot water for bathing or washing, but not for cooking or anything else. First, I do not think it is not much more efficient, you still waste water when you turn on the faucet. Secondly, hot water from pipe tends to bring with it some chemicals from the pipe. I admit that I brew beer and make wine, so I only use cold water, even when I sanitise ...


1

Why didn't anyone suggest an electric kettle? That's a great way to just heat the water you want. You can then pour a little hot and a little cold from the tap to get the temperature you want. They are extremely common in UK/Aus, but still can be found in the US.


1

The more pedantic may say that this does not directly answer the question, but if you have a microwave I would recommend you put the items in a pyrex with a lid with half an inch (1cm) of water at the bottom and microwave for 5 minutes at full power (make sure the water boils). That is the way we always sterilized our baby things. You are boiling much less ...



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