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13

So let's build your system. For a remote water valve, try http://www.fortrezz.com/index.php/products/water-valve Once you have that working, you'll need a Z-Wave controller. I've had good luck with the SmartThings hub: http://www.smartthings.com And then you can just pair them and it will show up as a device you can control via the Smart Things ...


8

You could make someone happy and have it video inspected and/or snaked (where "someone" is the guy who gets paid) but there's plenty of 100 year old waste plumbing still in service, and not being used does not harm the pipe. Dump 5 gallons down there and see if it leaves promptly - if not, then spend extra money on it.


3

An interesting leak detection system you can find in industrial processes can be implemented with a flow sensor (or level sensor) on the PVC pipes leaving the building : the flow (or level) is monitored real-time whenever on a particular day, min(flow) > 0 ; there is probably a leak whenever there is a flow > 0 between 02:00:00 and 03:00:00 ; there is ...


3

Apart from notification, cut off the main water line when detecting a leak. For example WaterCop. It may connect to your existing automation system; see their FAQ: WaterCop systems are equipped with auxiliary input/output contacts and can be wired into your existing home automation system with simple low voltage wiring (wiring not included). Please ...


3

Your options are: Do nothing. A little bit of standing water on an unsealed concrete floor will seep away and vanish in a few hours to days. Use a broom or squeegee and move the water outside or to a drain. Place catch basins (if it comes from a drip above) or barriers (if it comes from the side over the floor) to prevent the water from standing on the ...


3

This should not be a problem. Just make sure to leave the cavity open long enough to let the wet spots dry out.


3

Model the water heater as a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), so it is always at a uniform temperature. Assume the recovery time is not dependent on temperature and completely accounts for insulation losses and the like. Neglect losses in pipes and assume the operator controls the shower temperature to 105°F perfectly. Taking the stopping criterion ...


2

What room is this in? Is the room near the kitchen or the bathroom? Is that an exterior wall? I will see this in our bathroom when I forget to turn on the fan, or when I run the humidifier in a room with a cold exterior wall. It's likely just condensation from cooking, a humidifier, the shower, etc. The drops are darker because as they roll down the ...


2

Particularly if you have an oversized boiler already, extending the hot water makes more sense. It's not terribly difficult to insulate it properly - especially for a mere 10 or 15 feet. Use 1" PEX and build an XPS (waterproof styrofoam insulation sheets) box, keeping the lines (supply and return) separated with insulation, polyurethane foam it to fill and ...


2

We can only guess at this point, but one theory is that when it rains, you have water seeping down the outside of your foundation until it hits the footer, at which point it's seeping into your basement. At the point where you have this puddle, what is outside? Is there a gutter downspout there? Or perhaps the ground is sloping towards your house at that ...


1

Sanity check: Are you sure it's actually dripping? Hot-water pipes expanding/contracting due to temperature changes can sound very similar to a drip as they slip/stop/slip against their supports, and that's more likely at this time of year when the difference between a pipe with hot water flowing through it and one that's been sitting for a while is more ...


1

If it occurs during summer, and days when you run your air conditioner, its likely they fed the condensation drain pan to the house drain. Try turning off your AC for a whole day and see if you ever hear it. Its also possible that its someone else's AC unit that is drained to your drain, or in a multi-unit building, the common drain that happens to run ...


1

In most US jurisdictions, from a legal perspective, the work in the basement would fall under the local building code and its permitting, licensing, and inspection requirements...e.g. a splinkler contractor could not run the pipes inside the house and a plumber would be required, building department fees would be applicable, etc. The pipe running through ...


1

If the flow is blocked, then both the inlet pipe and the outlet pipe will be cold. Even if hot water got into the pipe, if there's no flow to replace it it will go cold fairly quickly. It will only gain heat by it conducting through the pipe and water without flow, which takes a long time and that heat would be lost before it ever got warm at inlet or ...


1

Depending how they work, I'd have to wonder if the test strips are being thrown off by the "soft" salt ions replacing the "hard" calcium ones. But I really don't know for certain how those tests work. You might try your "functional" tests on water that is drawn before the softener to see if the water after the softener behaves "essentially the same" or ...


1

Since it is constantly filling, then it sounds like you either have a really high water table, or there is a natural spring nearby. Either way, you have a big problem on your hands. You should find the source of the water and mitigate it before doing any further construction. They ran into this problem on one of the homes they were building on Hometime and ...


1

It all depends on what type of foundation it is, i.e. cement pad, basement, crawl space? Was there water present when the footers were being poured? Is there a crawl space or basement? How deep are the footers?



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