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10

Turn the water off, and remove it. Those things are rubbish, and always leak eventually. If you need a valve there, cut out the damaged section of pipe, and install a proper tee and valve. If you don't need it, cut out the damaged section of pipe and install a coupling. If you're not an expert solderer, They make push-fit fittings (SharkBite® is the well ...


7

As long as the attached timer is shut off and no water is flowing the pressure in the water line will be no different than what it would be when the spigot is turned off. You water bill will reflect how much water that you actually use. The only way it could go up astronomically would be if the timer broke off the spigot or failed in an open mode where ...


6

It's a self-piercing saddle valve like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB76LXrYKsU . If you're familiar with electronics, it works a lot like the so-called "vampire tap" for coax cable. Regardless, it's a quick and easy solution in the short-term, but they tend not to last. Because they are cheap, they tend to fail easily, and because they are ...


5

It is generally not worth the time and money to try to capture the lost heat through the exhaust system of the vast majority of tankless/on-demand water heaters. The heaters are now so efficient that they can vent the exhaust through plastic (PVC) pipe. Since these heaters also only operate when there is a call for hot water, they do not run very often. ...


5

There were some good suggestions to replace/remove the saddle valve, and I'll likely do that eventually. For now, though, I was able to cap it off with a 1/4" compression cap, similar to the one pictured below.


4

You can use an automatic air vent for the water supply. It has a air chamber and a float that will automatically bleed the accumulated air. They are also relatively inexpensive. The automatic air vent is commonly used for for hydronic water heating systems but make sure its approved for potable water in your case. This Honeywell EA122A1028 should work. ...


3

could be the cold has shrunk something, maybe rubber isolation, and the water was able to go around it (something like that caused the challenger explosion) could be the cold has cooled down the neighbours ceiling and the moisture in the room condensed there, like when you use air conditioning


3

There are basically two solutions: 1. Remove the saddle valve and replace with a coupling You need to do this if it is leaking from the rubber flashing around the pipe. 2. Cap the Valve You can unscrew the valve stem retaining nut and cap the top and side of the valve with compression nuts as described above. You can do this if, for instance, the valve ...


3

It's a self tapping valve, usually to provide water to a fridge. You can either replace it or eliminate it (use a coupling instead).


3

The diverter valve built into your faucet is downstream from the faucet valve that is designed to hold back "line" pressure. The diverter shunts water toward the spray head when you open the spray head valve, and directs it toward the fixed spout otherwise. The faucet sprayer head/nozzle is not designed to hold back system pressure. They would have to be ...


2

If you remove that, water is going to spray everywhere. You might be able to find a cap to screw onto it at the local hardware store. If it's at the end of the pipe you can easily fix it by: Turning off the water Purchase a pipe cutter (sort of looks like the letter C) and costs about $16.00 USD Purchase a 3/4" or 1/2" Shark bite connector. Around $5.00 ...


2

Not sure about inside, maybe damp rid or a dehumidifier. I don't suppose it wouldn't hurt to pack concrete in that gap under the wall/foundation (but you should dig this out from outside first). The truth is, water coming in must be taken care of from the outside. A picture of the outside might be helpful. I understand that you are on bedrock, but just to ...


2

To achieve the maximum flow keep your pump at ground level. With a 1/2" slightly pressurized intake it may help to put 3/4" out put to the water tank but much larger would probably be a waste of $. Make sure to have water in the pump at all times the shaft seals are usually ceramic with no water they overheat and crack. This would be another reason to keep ...


2

Could the melting ice water have caused a permanent leak to have developed? (my emphasis) Leaks generally don't repair themselves. Since there is evidence of a leak, it is very likely this will recur. This means that the leak needs to be actively investigated and fixed to prevent further damage. You downstairs neighbor will probably get someone to ...


1

Here in the UK one would normally use a compression repair coupler to repair a copper water pipe. Normally because it's burst but it would work just as well after removing that (presumablly) redundant and leaky valve. The repair coupler is longer than a normal coupler and only one end has a depth stop which makes it easy to slide onto a gap in existing ...


1

Teach your baby daughter to swim as soon as possible - there's plenty of water to fall into that is not in your garden. A pump rated for 0.7m head should be fine with a 0.6m lift. If you cannot find a pump with lower minimum flow (though, to be honest, you may find the "waterfall" aspect of 100 l/hr or 1.6 l/minute a bit more like a dull trickle) you can ...



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