Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Basically, water softeners contain a filter with a chemical that attracts positive ions (like the alkali metals calcium and magnesium). The filter is originally "charged" with sodium ions using the salt you put in the bin. Run hard water through it, and the calcium and magnesium compounds (mostly carbonates) are converted to sodium carbonate, which doesn't ...


7

The filter can help keep the softener from getting dirty while the filter doesn't care if it gets hard or soft water. So I'd have the filter first.


7

For the most part, softeners are pretty simple. Softening water works by exchanging positively charged ions with sodium ions. Because softeners backwash periodically to recharge, they have a timer (and sometimes a meter) to control when this happens. One of the problems with a mechanical unit is when the power goes out, the time freezes, and just picks up ...


6

You can easily calculate how often regeneration will be necessary if you know how hard your water is. If you are using city water, they should be able to tell you otherwise there are kits you can use to test your water. And any softener salesman should test your water as part of sizing your system. In my area, the hardness is measured in grains per gallon ...


6

The setting is the "input hardness". The zeolite matrix resin (the part that does the water softening) will nearly completely soften the water until it runs out of sodium. The resin in the tank is good for a certain amount of "hardness" (measured in grains), probably in the range 10,000-50,000 grains. The setting is used to calculate when the resin will need ...


5

Water softeners do use water to recharge, but it shouldn't be that much. With a new filter and all electronic controls working, most systems should send no more than 25 gallons through during a recharge cycle. The theory is that the filter media (special polymer beads, often stored in what looks like a high-pressure air tank) is "charged" with a high amount ...


5

Sounds like classic symptoms of hard water. Others: Spotty dishes, clothes that don't seem to get clean without using a lot of detergent. Soap doesn't get very "sudsy" when you get it wet. Soap scum on your bathtub. Buildup of mineral-like crust on shower-heads. Water softener heating element failure. You are very likely going to need a water ...


5

It controls the weight of the salt that is used. Potassium has a higher atomic weight than sodium, but they play the same role in the ion exchange reaction in the softener, so you need a greater weight of KCl to achieve the same level of softening. Potassium chloride has a molecular weight of 74.55, whereas Sodium chloride has one of 58.44, so in theory ...


5

I'm not sure if "waste" is the correct term. They need to backwash some water through them in order to remove the hard materials ("regenerate") they have removed from your water; it's a necessary evil of the process. It is however not just running water for the sake of it. How often this process runs will depend on how much water you use and how hard your ...


4

Finally found a web page that alluded to the answer. On the front panel of the control unit there is a small raindrop. While touching the raindrop (it doesn't look like a button), push the program/enter button. It will cycle through the factory settings, such as capacity and hardness.


4

The lucklihood is that it will reduce the pressure throughout the house significantly, especially if more than one faucet is running at once. It is also possible that the softener might not work correclty due to the reduced pressure, or that the output pressure will be even less than expected. I would think that hard water for a couple extra days would ...


4

I did some significant research on water softeners a few years ago. I did not find numbers for exactly how much water they use when the regenerate. However, there are multiple systems to determine when they regenerate. This can make a big difference on how much water is used. The simplest and cheapest models just have a timer for when they regenerate. ...


4

B2 is a bypass valve. B1 and B3 are so you can remove the water softener to replace it and still have water pressure in the house. B2 (only) or B1, B3 (only) should be open at any one time. "All the way to the right" (wound in clockwise) is closed on a standard valve. "All the way to the left" (wound out anti-clockwise) is open on a standard valve. You may ...


3

It's heating the existing water in the tank. And the tubes between the pump and the tank don't carry water; they carry refrigerant. The pump heats the refrigerant using the latent heat of the well water. The refrigerant goes through a large coil in the tank, heating the coil. The coil is immersed in your soft/clean water.


3

There's a good reason it's "an insane buy" but since you seem to be committed regardless (these things are why you pay an inspector and put conditions in the contract allowing you to walk away if inspection turns up issues...) There's no guarantee that a new well with solve any (much less all) of the issues, unless it ends up in a different water supply (not ...


3

The only thing that comes to mind for a practical "salt-free-softener" is a Reverse Osmosis (RO) system. You could also distill the entire water supply, but it's not practical unless you happen to be sitting on a lot of excess power/heat. An RO system is rather costly and wastes a considerable quantity of water, so they are more commonly used for drinking ...


3

Looking at your second photo, I'd say that the top spigot is soft and the bottom is hard. The bottom is directly connected to the water main, coming up through the concrete, through the pressure regulator (the bell-shaped object) and thus, is connected before the softener. There is no way to tell from the photos what is coming from the back-yard spigot. ...


3

If that water softener has a shutoff valve (it should, for service purposes), your task is simple - shut off the softener and test each sillcock. If you still get water, it's hard water. If not, you may get a very small flow for a moment (until the plumbing is all depressurized) but it'll stop quickly. If it does NOT have a shutoff valve, one should really ...


2

You should get a water softener as soon as possible. The same thing that is happening to your faucet spreaders, shower heads and dishwasher jets is also happening to your pipes, only it will be much harder and more expensive to fix them.


2

I've worked on software with water conditioning companies all over North America for the past 10 years, so I have a pretty good understanding of the business. My advice is to talk to several companies in your area about what they recommend. There are tons of dealers out there who can help you. They know the water in your area and the equipment best suited ...


2

That series was sold with and without a carbon filtering system which makes it a little harder to described. If you have a carbon filtering system (there's is called a "HYgene Bacteriostatic Filter Media" containing Silver Impregnated Activated Carbon) which is the more typically and suggested unless you have well water, the manufacturer suggests replacing ...


2

In my experience, quarter-turn ball vales are extremely reliable. I've seen some incredibly rusted out plumbing, including where the valve handle has completely fallen off after rusting through, and you can still reliably shut the valve with a pair of pliers or replacement handle. It's hard to check if it's faulty 100% (without cutting pipes, anyway), but ...


2

The reservoir of your unit needs to have a reasonable amount of rock salt in it in order to create a brine. You can fill it with salt, then check it occsionally and refill when you can see water over the remaining salt. The Costco unit you linked still has two tanks, they are simply contained in a single package. Ion exchange water softeners all work on the ...


2

"Iron Reducing Bacteria" create energy by oxidizing soluble iron in the water. In the process this creates insoluble iron which settles out and leaves iron staining. The bacteria themselves create biofilms or foamy messes in several areas, most notably toilet tanks and water heaters. Look in your toilet tank, if you have similar foam and iron staining you ...


2

Easy water does not lower hardness. It is some wires you wrap around the pipes that cost $1500 and "magnetize" the limestone so it "will not stick to you pipes and fixtures as much". Look it up under scams, fraud etc...


1

It sounds like it's an activated carbon filter, which takes organics out of the water (like the sulphur smell), and that it needs to be rebedded (this needs to happen typically once every 3 to 5 years, depending on level of contamination). Once the activated carbon is 'used up', it actually becomes a good breeding ground for bacteria and is worse than ...


1

Resin in softeners is typically only good for 10 years, and after that has to be rebedded (replaced). 1. Empty the old media from the tank Turn off the water supply and relieve pressure on the softener (easy way is to manually cycle the valve to drain a couple times until you don't hear water moving anymore). Disconnect the softener, and bring it ...


1

Appears to be the Brine Valve Housing and the Drive Gear, looking at the manual. Hague WaterMax 60 Series Owners Manual - Hague Quality Water -- Page 34, parts 4 and 11


1

As a guess, the pipes got layered internally in scale, that will come out over some time (dissolving into the now softer water). Some large chunks may require filter screens, shower heads and valves to be soaked in your vinegar or CLR (containing lactic and gluconic acids). I know boilers get descaling treatment, but I've not heard of the same with standard ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible