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8

Basically, water softeners contain a filter with a chemical that attracts positive ions (like the alkali metals calcium and magnesium). The filter is originally "charged" with sodium ions using the salt you put in the bin. Run hard water through it, and the calcium and magnesium compounds (mostly carbonates) are converted to sodium carbonate, which doesn't ...


7

For the most part, softeners are pretty simple. Softening water works by exchanging positively charged ions with sodium ions. Because softeners backwash periodically to recharge, they have a timer (and sometimes a meter) to control when this happens. One of the problems with a mechanical unit is when the power goes out, the time freezes, and just picks up ...


6

The setting is the "input hardness". The zeolite matrix resin (the part that does the water softening) will nearly completely soften the water until it runs out of sodium. The resin in the tank is good for a certain amount of "hardness" (measured in grains), probably in the range 10,000-50,000 grains. The setting is used to calculate when the resin will need ...


6

You can easily calculate how often regeneration will be necessary if you know how hard your water is. If you are using city water, they should be able to tell you otherwise there are kits you can use to test your water. And any softener salesman should test your water as part of sizing your system. In my area, the hardness is measured in grains per gallon ...


5

Sounds like classic symptoms of hard water. Others: Spotty dishes, clothes that don't seem to get clean without using a lot of detergent. Soap doesn't get very "sudsy" when you get it wet. Soap scum on your bathtub. Buildup of mineral-like crust on shower-heads. Water softener heating element failure. You are very likely going to need a water ...


5

It controls the weight of the salt that is used. Potassium has a higher atomic weight than sodium, but they play the same role in the ion exchange reaction in the softener, so you need a greater weight of KCl to achieve the same level of softening. Potassium chloride has a molecular weight of 74.55, whereas Sodium chloride has one of 58.44, so in theory ...


5

I'm not sure if "waste" is the correct term. They need to backwash some water through them in order to remove the hard materials ("regenerate") they have removed from your water; it's a necessary evil of the process. It is however not just running water for the sake of it. How often this process runs will depend on how much water you use and how hard your ...


4

Water softeners do use water to recharge, but it shouldn't be that much. With a new filter and all electronic controls working, most systems should send no more than 25 gallons through during a recharge cycle. The theory is that the filter media (special polymer beads, often stored in what looks like a high-pressure air tank) is "charged" with a high amount ...


4

The lucklihood is that it will reduce the pressure throughout the house significantly, especially if more than one faucet is running at once. It is also possible that the softener might not work correclty due to the reduced pressure, or that the output pressure will be even less than expected. I would think that hard water for a couple extra days would ...


4

I did some significant research on water softeners a few years ago. I did not find numbers for exactly how much water they use when the regenerate. However, there are multiple systems to determine when they regenerate. This can make a big difference on how much water is used. The simplest and cheapest models just have a timer for when they regenerate. ...


2

You should get a water softener as soon as possible. The same thing that is happening to your faucet spreaders, shower heads and dishwasher jets is also happening to your pipes, only it will be much harder and more expensive to fix them.


2

I've worked on software with water conditioning companies all over North America for the past 10 years, so I have a pretty good understanding of the business. My advice is to talk to several companies in your area about what they recommend. There are tons of dealers out there who can help you. They know the water in your area and the equipment best suited ...


2

That series was sold with and without a carbon filtering system which makes it a little harder to described. If you have a carbon filtering system (there's is called a "HYgene Bacteriostatic Filter Media" containing Silver Impregnated Activated Carbon) which is the more typically and suggested unless you have well water, the manufacturer suggests replacing ...


2

In my experience, quarter-turn ball vales are extremely reliable. I've seen some incredibly rusted out plumbing, including where the valve handle has completely fallen off after rusting through, and you can still reliably shut the valve with a pair of pliers or replacement handle. It's hard to check if it's faulty 100% (without cutting pipes, anyway), but ...


2

The reservoir of your unit needs to have a reasonable amount of rock salt in it in order to create a brine. You can fill it with salt, then check it occsionally and refill when you can see water over the remaining salt. The Costco unit you linked still has two tanks, they are simply contained in a single package. Ion exchange water softeners all work on the ...


1

It sounds like it's an activated carbon filter, which takes organics out of the water (like the sulphur smell), and that it needs to be rebedded (this needs to happen typically once every 3 to 5 years, depending on level of contamination). Once the activated carbon is 'used up', it actually becomes a good breeding ground for bacteria and is worse than ...


1

Resin in softeners is typically only good for 10 years, and after that has to be rebedded (replaced). 1. Empty the old media from the tank Turn off the water supply and relieve pressure on the softener (easy way is to manually cycle the valve to drain a couple times until you don't hear water moving anymore). Disconnect the softener, and bring it ...


1

As a guess, the pipes got layered internally in scale, that will come out over some time (dissolving into the now softer water). Some large chunks may require filter screens, shower heads and valves to be soaked in your vinegar or CLR (containing lactic and gluconic acids). I know boilers get descaling treatment, but I've not heard of the same with standard ...


1

If it were me, I would definitely put the softener in the garage. Protecting it from weather, critters, and extreme temperature variation seem reason enough. But to also have it where you can easily monitor it daily seems reason enough again to locate it in the garage. But the water meter looks like it is above ground: Maybe the climate is safe against ...


1

There are several types of regeneration options. Onet thing I would recommend is getting a metered softener rather than a strictly timer option. The metered softener regenerates at a certain time of the day when enough water has passed through it to need regenerated. You will need to have your water tested to determine the hardness and iron levels. These ...



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