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1

OK...I'm embarrassed. I know I said it wasn't the filter, because every three months I take of the filters and clean them with vinegar. I went ahead and took out the aerator assembly, and there was what looked like very thin plastic stuck in the hole in the center, blocking all water from coming through. A few years ago I saw similar material in my ...


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Any chance you're using Watts FloodSafe supply lines? They look like this. They're special supply lines that have a shutoff device that will shut off the flow of water if the flow rate increases beyond a specified rate. If that's the case, turn off the water supply valves, disconnect the supply lines at the point where it connects to the valve (not under ...


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Do you have shutoff valves for the sink exhibiting the problem? These are likely under the sink hidden in a cabinet. If so, turn them off and remove the hot and cold water hoses from the faucet's end. With each end of the hose in a bucket, test the water supply by turning on the shutoff valve. If you get flow, then the issue is with the faucet fixture. If ...


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Buy a captive-air (bladder) pressure tank (accumulator) and be done with it. If you pressurize water with nitrogen without a bag/bladder/diaphragm, you're going to discover that nitrogen does dissolve in water. This is a very evolved technology where you are stunningly unlikely to invent something better than what already exists, and certain to spend more ...


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Oops, I think I misunderstood the question. It sounds like this is a "frostproof" spigot. If so, there should be a small white plastic cap on the top of the spigot just behind the knob. A picture would ensure that a proper identification is made. Most of these spigots can be rebuilt. However, it may be more efficient (time wise) to replace it (depending ...


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To pressurize water you can simply put a tank on the roof (or build a new water tower) and feed with pumps from storage tanks lower down. This is done in in many high rise buildings in New York were the municipal water pressure is not big enough to reach the higher floors. If the roof is not strong enough to hold a water tank (and you are not allowed to ...


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Yes, no reason this can't work, within the limits of the pressure tank (alternate name for "bladder accumulator" not that there is anything incorrect about that term - suspect it's regional differences in terms.) The one on my well pump system stores ~30 liters of water, but they come in many sizes and can be combined, so you should be able to store as much ...


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Normal domestic water diaphragm accumulators (usually bladder accumulators are used) would not be feasible as they are used with a pump that cuts off when max tank pressure is reached. When you say "use them as a water source" please give an idea of estimated capacity needed at what pressure. Perhaps you should be using a simple raised atmospheric ...



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