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32

This is an effective trick a plumbing contractor once told me. Go to your local home improvement store and buy a cheap shower head (the one I picked up cost $1.50). If you look down inside of the showerhead you'll see a washer which constricts the water flow. If you take a drill and enlarge the hole, thereby increasing flow, the water pressure will ...


16

In the U.S., shower heads are required by government regulation to restrict water flow in order to save water and energy. By law, they must deliver less than 2.5 gallons per minute. For this reason, many shower heads will deliver less than ideal flow and/or pressure. To get around the law, and benefit those with less-than-stellar water pressure, many ...


13

Look for something like this. near or on the water meter. This is a pressure reducing valve, and it's used by some municipalities to control the pressure entering to house. They are adjustable, so the one in your house might be set too low. If you have a manifold setup on the PEX system, check to make sure the shutoffs on the manifold are fully open. You ...


12

Low pressure can be caused by old galvanized pipe, which often build up deposits causing the water to be restricted. Another cause of low pressure can be incorrect pipe size. I like to run a 3/4" trunk line with 1/2" legs to fixtures (which I think is pretty common). Some houses have pressure reducing valves on the supply line, which are used to control ...


9

I say BFP first. The backflow preventer must be installed before any point in the system where the line becomes "open" to the introduction of pollutants that would make the water unsafe for drinking (fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, animal wastes, bacteria, and other things you generally find in your topsoil). While a pressure reducer's basic operation ...


8

The usual remedy is to install a water-pressure regulator (aka. water-pressure–reducing valve) where the water line enters the building: They cost about $70, and the plumber should be able to install it in less than an hour. But since you live in an apartment, this is probably something the landlord or condo management company would have to arrange. ...


7

If the cold water pressure is good, then you are right about the shower head not being the problem. Check the hot water shut off valve feeding the tub to assure it is opened fully. Also if you have good hot water pressure at the vanity and are sure shut off valve is fully open, the problem may be in the mixing valve that feeds the shower head. It's not ...


7

One thing to check before replacing items is the inline filter (if present). When my shower was performing poorly, I unscrewed the head and found a small mesh screen in the line that was clogging up. I cleaned it out and screwed everything back together to find my pressure right back where I expected it. :)


7

9 times out of 10, like Tester mentions, this is going to be the aerator. Unscrew it, run some water without it, and clean it before screwing it back on. There's all kinds of stuff that gets knocks around in the pipes when water is shutoff and things are added or replaced in the plumbing system, and the best place for them to end up is the kitchen sink ...


7

Not clear what the reason for the question is. However, nominal water pressure for most residential homes is in the range of 40-70 psi (pounds per square inch). It can vary due to the distance from the home to the water source (such as a water tower), how much water is being used by surrounding homes (higher usage will lower the pressure), the capacity of ...


7

Clogged line There could be a clog in the lines feeding some of the sprinklers, or clogged up sprinkler heads. Remove all the sprinkler heads (the procedure will vary based on the type of heads). Inspect and clean the heads. Turn the system on. If you don't notice any dirt or gunk coming out, and the pressure does not increase in the low flowing ...


7

If you are on a municipal system and have pressure that high, you quite likely already have a pressure reducing valve (PRV) installed near your water meter. The International Plumbing Code requires PRVs on any water supply over 80psi. If this is the case, your PRV may just need adjustment. As they age, the spring regulating the device's operation can soften. ...


7

I believe the pressure loss depends on the flow rate. There will be some loss of pressure. To avoid it you need 2" copper pipe or multiple parallel 1/2" pipes (probably more than 16).


6

I would minimize the amount you bend them. Think of it like a metal coat hanger, if you bend it in the same place several times, it will break. Only the copper pipe is hollow, so it will break a lot sooner. As best you can, avoid bending it multiple times in the same place.


6

I'm going to assume it's a typical gate valve, and also since you said main water valve I'll assume it's the main shutoff just before the meter. With these assumptions in mind, I'm going to say you will have to call your local municipality. The water company does not allow (or like) home owners to tamper with anything near (and defiantly not before) the ...


6

If you're up for it, I would install a valve in the wall while you have the water shut off. When you're done, you'll have a separate shutoff for the fridge and your bathroom available again. To make it look nice, I'd go for a valve box that you mount in the wall:


5

The most likely cause is that dirt or debris from the water line repair have gotten jammed in the PRV so that it cannot close. You can remove it and see if there's anything visible that can be cleaned, but at that point, you may as well replace it with a new one that you'll know is good.


4

Is it the water pressure for the whole bathroom, or just the shower that's sub-par? Before I bought a house, my last apartment had really poor pressure in the shower, but the bathtub faucet was fine. I removed the shower head to see if that was the cause, and sure enough, there was plenty of water pressure in the shower, it was just the cheapo shower head ...


4

Check the main shutoff valve, where the water comes in the house; it may be partially closed; close it, then open again. Also check the screen on the hose, it may be full of gunk. You may have a faulty pressure regulator, you can check your pressure easily with an inexpensive gauge


4

The part that jumped out at me is this: "4" well with a submerged pump and a pressure tank in the garage." How big is your pressure tank? My guess is that the greater water draw of a 1/2 or 5/8 inch hose can drain the tank in 15 minutes. The washer or shower has a much lower flow rate in gallons per minute used than a hose. When the pressure is low from ...


4

Adjusting the whole-house water pressure is unlikely to solve this problem, simply because you set your shower temperature based on some initial balance of hot and cold. When other people draw cold water only, the pressure difference will still have the potential to affect your shower temperature. Instead, you should get a pressure balanced valve or shower ...


4

The lucklihood is that it will reduce the pressure throughout the house significantly, especially if more than one faucet is running at once. It is also possible that the softener might not work correclty due to the reduced pressure, or that the output pressure will be even less than expected. I would think that hard water for a couple extra days would ...


4

I would think you would need the backflow valve first. I don't think it maters much for operating, but I think the water co. might want it that way. Are you regulating the water pressure to your whole house? Or just the irrigation system? I ask because if you are doing the house, then you need to adjust the air pressure in your expansion tank on the water ...


4

The hose clamp is right out. All you'll do is crack something -- if you're lucky, right away. Likewise trying to inject PVC cement (705) is not a good idea. Even if you manage to plug the leaks, the majority of the joint is compromised. It will eventually fail, and the law practically says it will fail 2 hours after you've left for a 2 week vacation, ...


4

If you have well water, you almost certainly have a pressure tank. The well pump runs until the pressure in the tank (and the overall system) is up to a predesignated level, then shuts off. The tank pressure then pushes water through the system until the pressure drops to a lower predetermined level. Then the pump motor kicks in again. This is supposed to ...


4

Here is what I found. I went to the hardware store and located two of the replacement valve cartridge made by Delta. Reading the back of them I found that one was for faucet made after 2005 and the other was for faucet made before 2006. Being that my house was built in 2000 I went for the one made before 2006. I then replaced the after market cartridge ...


4

Sounds like there's gunk stuck in the shower line somewhere between the branch for the shower and the shower's hot water valve. HOPEFULLY it's stuck right there at the valve. One thing you can do is shut off the hot water in the house, then remove the knob and valve stem for the hot water in the shower, then turn the water back on. Water will flow out of ...


4

If you can't add parallel paths through the heater as @redgrittybrick suggests, add a bypass with 2" pipe and a throttling valve. The valve will let you balance overall flow vs heat gain. The bypass arrangement will lessen the strain on your pump seals and motor.


4

I have a feeling your design looks like this: You should do this instead: If you make 16 parallel copper circuits, that would have an equivalent cross-section or a 2 inch pipe. However, I would probably do more like 20 circuits because all of those bends are going to introduce additional pumping/pressure losses and the extra circuits will make up for ...


4

You would need to increase the pipe size from the water supply (hot and cold) to the shower in question. A potential alternate solution/issue may be that some (most?) of the "gate" or "diverter" valves are not really giving full flow to either device when "set in the middle" - they are designed to go one way or the other, not both. A different one might ...



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