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When we lived in South Africa, we had a 500Litre boiler that was always on. But it was insulated by the factory and the theory was that on night tariff 23:00-4:00, at 80% cost, we could heat the water up to 80degrees and before it reaches 22:00 the water is still 50ish degrees celsius. But if we used up the water we would have to manual override it and get ...


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You will always (always!) save energy by turning the heater off when you don't need hot water. How much energy you save depends on the efficiency of the water heater but you will always save energy - it doesn't matter what size your tank is or how well is is insulated. The ultimate reason for this is "the rate of heat loss of a body is proportional to the ...


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You have used the wrong type of teflon tape - for gas the thicker yellow teflon tape should be used. Another option which many prefer is to use a pipe sealant like RectorSeal. If after replacing the white teflon the smell persists I would check the other end of the gas line. It's possible that when removing the old gas line an existing fitting was ...


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It's doable and there are a few approaches including those as listed above. One possible and not completely mad idea recycles drinks cans. http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Build-a-Soda-Can-Heater/


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I just bought a Sears water heater and it was making a loud whining-droning noise. (the Sears store told me it was the flue that the non Sears plumber installed- this was baloney) I called Sears tech and the repairmen said it was a known problem in a gas valve- took him 10 minutes to fix it. I couldn't see exactly what he tweaked next to the burner. But ...


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The answer as to how much it costs to keep the water hot 24/7 will depend on a number of factors: size and shape of tank, effectiveness of insulation, temperature of surroundings and of the heated water. FWIW, my standard 180 litre electric hot water heater has a data plate that claims a standby loss rate of 76 Watts. That doesn't seem to present much ...


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This is probably along the same sort of idea as turning off the A/C via the breaker in the winter. A dose of paranoia (what if the heater stays on all day because the thermostat is broken?) and a little bit of sense. Assuming that your water heater is not a perfect insulator, you are probably losing some money by keeping the water heater at a good ...


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Sounds like a partial clog/blockage of a pipe. It is most likely in one of the fitting that was added. Is shutoff valves all open completely? Is that pex piping? Is it kinked somewhere? Does the water pressure drop when using cold water? If you paid someone to add the tank tell them to fix it. They screwed up somewhere.


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The top element is always the first one on. In fact the bottom element does not receive power until the top thermostat is satisfied. I’m guessing that setting your top thermostat to a 150 would give you small amount of really hot water rather quickly, while setting the upper and lower thermostats evenly to a moderate temperature (115-125) would be your ...


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3x 300 watt servers together would produce ~3070 BTU/hr. ~1023 BTU/hr each. There's no particular hazard to running the servers near a water heater or furnace, other than the heat associated with those items raising the baseline before you add the heat thrown off by the servers. Most system administrators would choose not to but that's from a "hazard to the ...


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If you still aren't satisfied with how long it takes to get hot water at the faucet, you'll need the plumbing reworked. A PEX system with local manifold (closer to the point of use) and a recirculating pump works great.


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Yes, of course. There are a huge number of well-tested DIY projects you can find here: http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/WaterHeating/water_heating.htm I would heavily recommend browsing that site and learning from the experience of others who have already done what you're interested in doing so you don't burn even more money.


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Yes, it's doable. There are lots of youtube How-To's on the subject, which you are already aware of. I would also suggest that, while driving or walking around residential neighborhoods to look for passive solar installations and approach the owner with any questions you might have. They'll probably have some good information for you (sizing, costs), as ...


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The tank should be charged to the pressure at the attachment point. If the tank is attached to a point in the system where the pressure is supposed to be 25 psi, the tank should be pre-charged to 25 psi. If the tank is attached to a point in the system where the pressure is supposed to be 55 psi, the tank should be charged to 55 psi. When the water ...



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