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One thing's for sure: Turn off the gas to the heater. The pipe may still be connected, and you're not smelling anything, but that pipe is still pumping gas into the heater. That's a MAJOR safety hazard, and if I were you, I'd get an electric heater, unless you have no other choice but to get a gas heater.


1

These are all signs that the tank has corroded through. Looks like you should be in the market for a new hot water tank.


0

It's all about heat load. A very well insulated building may have a heat load so low that most boilers would be operating very inefficently to meet the load - sitting idle most of the time, even on "design days" when the heat load is at the greatest due to the outside temperature being the lowest temperature designed for (thus, "design day.") As a ...


1

This is completely normal and is the reason it is suggested you drain and flush your tank periodically. Even better than just draining a gallon of water is to turn off the tank (either kill the electricity or turn off the gas valve), shutoff the water to the tank, drain the entire tank, and then with the drain open, run the water to flush any remaining ...


2

One could always come up with hypothetical scenarios, but this seems pretty unlikely for several reasons. One: For electric current to be in "contact" with the water, there'd have to be physical damage to wires or heating elements, with just the right bad luck that they came in contact with the tank. And the tank itself would have to conduct electricity. ...


0

It sounds like either a dirty pilot light or your the flame may be getting into your air venturi. I would have the burner pulled and clean both the pilot burner and main burner including venturi tube.


28

I'm from Serbia, just like the OP, and we do have such a myth there. After my initial rant, aimed at explaining why some of the safety assumptions that many answers here may have are wrong, I'll show installation of a typical water heater and explain a couple of issues that I see with the installation. (Feel free to skip this part) First, some background, ...


5

In any administration where internationally recognised regulatory rules are used and means are provided to ENSURE that all except a few rogue installations are installed to the standards then the risk of electric shock from such installations is extremely small. I have never heard of such an installation causing shock or death in New Zealand (where I live). ...


10

In the UK we have electric showers which heat water on demand - ie they're supplied with 230V using about 9kW, which is enough for a moderate flow of cold water to be heated to about 50C as it flows through the shower. Not only are they directly connected to the shower hose, they're usually inside the shower cubicle - so the unit gets wet and the electrical ...


2

Ex-communist or not, real reason is that many older building have substandard wiring, especially grounding which in combination with metallic plumbing can cause electric shocks even without insulation fault.


22

If the water heater is not properly grounded, it could be dangerous but then it would be dangerous all the time, not just when you take a shower. Sounds to me like a myth that got started because someone once was injured by a faulty water heater and then the myth took on a life of its own. If the water heater is wired properly you have nothing to fear. ...


7

I have never heard of such a thing, and in the USA the water heater is usually tucked away in some hard-to-access place like a basement or utility closet. Turning it on and off all the time would be totally impractical. I know in some other countries it is typical to have the water heater installed in the kitchen or bathroom.


2

To add anything to the water heater you will need to turn the water off and drain the pressure in the lines. After this there are 2 choices; Pull the anode probably the best idea because it may have dissolved. The 2nd choice would be to pull the supply line and add there. I have never had this problem that flushing and replacing the anode did not fix. After ...


1

In then end it was indeed the thermocouple. At some point the water heater shut off and things got cold enough that condensation formed when it was restarted. Since replacing the thermocouple, the problem has not reoccurred.


1

It depends on what type of failure are you talking about. The rate at which water flows from a leak, is going to depend on the size of the leak. It could range anywhere from less than 1 ml per day, to the full supply flow rate. If it's a catastrophic failure, you could be talking about the full contents spilling out in a matter of seconds/minutes, followed ...


2

I've recently had a problem with my gas water heater turning off frequently. When I called the manufacturer, they asked if I had a dryer in the same room. My answer was, "yes, the dryer sits next to the water heater in an open room of the basement." The rep said that was most likely the problem. When hot water heaters are in the same room with dryers, over ...


0

Ben Welborn is correct. Sediment or mineral is keeping the drain valve from seating properly if everything is closed inside especially the hot and your cold inlet valve works you could change out the valve without draining the heater. But I'm assuming since there is a sump that this is down inside a basement. Drain and replace use a 3/4 di electric nipple ...



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