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I had the same problem with a recently installed HTP Phoenix Light Duty. When it would fire up to high, there would be a reverberation that sounded kind of like it was coming from the exhaust pipe. It was especially bad at the vent exit from the garage. The noise was periodic, meaning that it would come on for a few seconds and then go off. Did not ...


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Have you checked your inlet pressure and compare with the manufacturer's specified manifold pressure? If the inlet pressure is too high, you may need to install an appliance regulator and adjust it to the manufacture's specified pressure.


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Your hydronic heating system should operate between 15 and 20 psi. The expansion tank, which is pressurized by factory, should be pressurized close to the operating pressure. At no time should your system ever exceed, or come close to exceeding the pressure relief valve rating which is 30psi. Most residential closed loop systems operate at 15-18psi. If the ...


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There are a few problems with your plan. Thermal Conductivity First off. If you're going to make a heat exchanger, you should use copper instead of PEX. Copper has a thermal conductivity of 401 watts/meter kelvin (W/mK), while PEX is closer to 0.51. Volume The next problem, is the volume of water you're preheating. 1" PEX has an inside diameter (I.D.) ...


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Did you insulate your pipes beyond the water heater so that they are not losing the heat rise per foot? The hotter they stay before appliance the less demand for rise on the heater. Make sure you tape all the seams. Also do a tune on your heater -- often with both on boil and forced style heaters the efficiency and heat rise are below spec. I've seen ...


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You could add a smaller tank-less heater in front. Some of them are even rated to be plugged into an outlet so you won't have to do additional electrical work. In Europe I've seen it done with a bigger unit to supply the whole house and a smaller one at the shower for use during the winter. In either case you're going to get a lot further with this ...


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The typical way to pre-warm water is to install a standard tank water heater before the tankless, but leave it turned off. Using an automotive radiator is a terrible idea. You don't want to connect something not designed for potable water to your plumbing. That's just asking for trouble. The pex idea is interesting. The only reason that I can think that ...


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Do NOT use an automotive radiator - it's not meant for nor suitable for potable water use. If you have a "relatively warm basement" you can either use a plain, uninsulated pressure tank (a "tempering" tank in this application - cold in the bottom, warmed out the top) or run a long run of large-ish diameter PEX (to minimize pressure drop) around the basement ...


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Replacing the tank eliminates the most common suspects, although it is conceivably possible that you've just had terrible luck and there's a similar issue with the new tank as well. You can test the capacity of your water heater using this procedure, filling buckets with hot water and measuring the temperature to see how much you can draw down before it gets ...


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There should (might actually) be a thermostat control on the water heater unit. Typically, in the US at least and on the units of which I've experienced, it's a big, round, red knob which will give you suggestions like "HOT", etc. Today's more efficient units may even have an "Energy Efficient" specific setting. Adjust it to your liking. Note that this may ...


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I think you mean soldered? A picture would help, a lot. There should be a flexible line going from the valve to the pipe system that detaches by loosening the hex-nut fitting. If there isn't a flex, you will be cutting it out and installing it properly, so that swapping out the next tank in ten years doesn't require calling a plumber, again. I'm guessing ...



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