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As you just noted gas exhaust flues get "pretty hot". Which is the reason they should not be in contact with combustible material. Also they need to be 'double walled' if they are passing through an enclosed surface. Also be sure the vents terminate to the outside, but not in close proximity to any windows or return air registers.


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As been pointed out there will be some residual amounts of water left in the hot (and cold) lines even when the tank is empty. Which is you should open the valve farthest from the tank as it is being drained. The other problem I noted is that unless you have an immense (100 gl.) water heater or a very narrow drain valve the shouldn't take so long to drain. ...


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In order to use propane, the appliance needs to be converted, and you will need a regulator: By default, most gas-fueled appliances are sold configured for natural gas (methane) and NOT propane. Because of the chemical differences, propane requires a different ratio of fuel to air in order to burn properly. This is accomplished by changing the fuel nozzle ...


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A - Expansion tank. This prevents the pressure increase due to heating water, from damaging the plumbing. The tank is filled with air, that is separated from the water by a bladder. When the water expands due to heating, water compresses the air absorbing the pressure. B - Check valve (or back flow valve). This is designed to only allow water to flow in ...


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The white pipe at the top left appears to have a thermostatic mixer valve. That's the output side of the water heater. To avoid running out of hot water too quickly, the tank is set to a somewhat higher temperature than is actually desired, and this valve mixes that with cold water to get the actual temperature and sends that to the rest of the house. The ...


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That depends. If the water heater in question has a pilot light, as opposed to an igniter, then probably not, but if there is an igniter and not a pilot light, the fuse for the igniter could blow as the igniter tries to light a nonexistent gas flow. As far as physical damage to the water heater itself, I don't see how. A fuse is a pretty minor fix. And if ...


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Any leak large enough to stop the water from filling the heater tank would have to be so large as to basically be an open ended line. It would be impossible not to notice the flooding caused by a leak this large. A smaller leak would not stop the heater from filling and operating and you would have some hot/warm water delivery. I am not saying you don't have ...


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Based on the International Residential code (which may or may not apply where you live), this installation is not compliant. Things that I see that need to be corrected include (but may not be limited to): The vent must be held at least one inch away from wood and other combustibles. The total rise of the vent must be at least five feet, to insure proper ...


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20 years old, it's almost certainly time for a new one unless it's of very unusual construction - like stainless steel. If water: overflows from the top of the pipe onto the floor Then the overflow pipe is not correctly routed - it should go DIRECTLY down to the floor. I can see it going sideways in the picture on your other question. It also appears ...


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I live in Illinois, so my building codes may differ from yours. Currently, my water heater is located next to my furnace. This makes it easy to supply gas to it. I already had a 1" pipe from the meter drop down between the two appliances. It was easy enough to shot off 1/2" pipe to both appliances. Also, where your furnace is located you'll already have ...



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