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7

The typical way to pre-warm water is to install a standard tank water heater before the tankless, but leave it turned off. Using an automotive radiator is a terrible idea. You don't want to connect something not designed for potable water to your plumbing. That's just asking for trouble. The pex idea is interesting. The only reason that I can think that ...


6

How often does your heating system spring a leak? It's not particularly often in my (long) experience with closed-crcuit hot water heating systems - less than once per 20 years, I'd say, and usually with some outside cause. In general, it is a waste of money to remove/replace a system that's working. To address one of your "benefits" - where do you suppose ...


6

You could add a smaller tank-less heater in front. Some of them are even rated to be plugged into an outlet so you won't have to do additional electrical work. In Europe I've seen it done with a bigger unit to supply the whole house and a smaller one at the shower for use during the winter. In either case you're going to get a lot further with this ...


5

Yes, it's possible to bench solder, and in fact you should generally avoid soldering on an assembled threaded assembly. "Oven soldering" is a completely absurd approach to plumbing. Save it for your SMT electronics projects. If you are very uncomfortable about soldering, just use threaded pipe (steel, brass, stainless steel...) and threaded fittings.


4

It's mostly the gas pipe. A tankless water heater is going to need a 1" or even 1.5" pipe to feed it. Your current water heater probably uses a 1/2" pipe. The new pipe probably needs to come off the main trunk, and replacing it requires a precise gas volume calculation and gas plumbing work that is very skilled labor and not cheap. If your plumber can't do ...


4

As I suspected, the code you're referencing is from the National Fuel Gas Code. I was not able to find anything in National Electrical Code, or International Residential Code that mentions this in the context of electric appliances. National Fuel Gas Code 2002 Chapter 8 Equipment Installation 8.1 General. 8.1.10 Installation in Residential ...


4

This is a VERY misinterpreted section of the code, especially by lay people and home inspectors. Most homeowners and likewise simply think a water heater cannot be near a panel, for what reason I don't know. Basically, the panel can be anywhere in the 30" width working space. There is no mention of center of the panel or otherwise. Meaning, the panel can ...


4

Do NOT use an automotive radiator - it's not meant for nor suitable for potable water use. If you have a "relatively warm basement" you can either use a plain, uninsulated pressure tank (a "tempering" tank in this application - cold in the bottom, warmed out the top) or run a long run of large-ish diameter PEX (to minimize pressure drop) around the basement ...


4

Your diagnostics so far point to the indirect hot water heater coil leaking potable water into the furnace loop as the most likely issue. You could perhaps verify if you can shut your hot water down for a few days (not convenient, I know.) Depending on the overall condition of the indirect water heater tank, the coil can often be replaced as a part, if the ...


3

Yes, it's good possibility that if you don't purposefully depressurize the lines first, you will get spray. But this is easy to do. Turn off the hot water heater. If it's electric, there is usually an off position on the knob on the front, or turn it off at the breaker panel. If it's gas, just turn the knob to pilot. Turn off the cold water supply to the ...


3

Concentric PVC is a thing. I like concentric pipes because they only require a single penetration rather than two. Honestly, any of your options should be fine for a high-efficiency gas appliance and a three foot pipe run. The exhaust temperature of condensing, high-efficiency gas appliances is pretty low, which is why PVC is an option. PVC might be expected ...


3

Model the water heater as a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), so it is always at a uniform temperature. Assume the recovery time is not dependent on temperature and completely accounts for insulation losses and the like. Neglect losses in pipes and assume the operator controls the shower temperature to 105°F perfectly. Taking the stopping criterion ...


3

Only "power-vent" type gas water heaters can be vented with plastic pipe. These are gas water heaters with a fan on top which blows the flue gas (and cools it by mixing surrounding cool air with it, hence plastic vent is OK) out of the house. Most can be vented with 3" PVC (white), ABS (black), or CPVC (kinda tan colored). These vents can be run horizontally ...


3

It turns out it's nothing to do with the water heater. The sump pump's backup battery, which is pretty close to the water heater, exploded inside its container. That's what caused the smell.


3

The manual will say something like Flushing the heat exchanger with a descaling solution if mineral build up is evident. Scale build up will shorten the life of the water heater, descale heat exchanger thoroughly and repeat annually depending on mineral content of ground water. (From Bosch 2400E NG user manual) or maybe something like Periodic ...


3

You should make two phone calls. The first to your local building department, which should be able to answer all your code related questions. They may even have a handout or other documentation, that outlines the requirements of replacing a water heater. The second call should be to a local Rheem dealer, or directly to Rheem. They will be able to answer ...


3

There is a restriction, somewhere. You could use your gauge to verify that the pressure (while you are flowing from faucets) at the water heater is good (you've only done so qualitatively so far, and you have means to test it quantitatively, so....) But basically somewhere in the line is something that is restricting water flow - perhaps a clogged or ...


3

I think you mean soldered? A picture would help, a lot. There should be a flexible line going from the valve to the pipe system that detaches by loosening the hex-nut fitting. If there isn't a flex, you will be cutting it out and installing it properly, so that swapping out the next tank in ten years doesn't require calling a plumber, again. I'm guessing ...


3

Your best bet would be an IR or instant read thermometer. You should test it from the closest faucet to the hot water tank, and make sure to let it run for several minutes first. If you do use a leave-in meat thermometer, it might take several minutes to get an accurate reading. Ice water should be close to 0C/32F (and if you add salt, it would get even ...


2

I wouldn't bother unless you're going to have your water turned off for a couple days. In that case, turn off the water heater itself. You'll have a hard time using any hot water with the main turned off, so it is mainly a consideration of whether or not it's worth it to keep the water in the tank hot over the period you won't be using it.


2

Do a quick search online for the brand and model of the water heater. Most manuals for install are available online, but of course this will depend on the age of the unit. The manual (in most cases) describes the limitations of exhaust pipe distances and in particular the inclusion of elbows in the flue. It is important to check as elbows reduce the ease of ...


2

Unless your hot water heater is positively vented (i.e. an exhaust blower), you need a draft hood in order to prevent back pressure in the vent line. If you connect directly to the hot water heater without a draft hood, you are risking having the pilot light blown out by pressure in the vent (think wind) or letting exhaust gases escape into your house. It's ...


2

Such a variation is not normal unless you are using an abnormally high amount of water so that the water heater does not have enough time to recover. Otherwise, since the heater worked properly when first installed, I would recommend calling the installer.


2

Did you ask the maintenance guy what he did to "fix" it the first two times? This should give a pretty good clue as to what might have gone wrong. Seeing the picture we can see that this is a natural gas water heater. Is it possible that the pilot is going out? Pilot lights can be going out for a number of reasons: 1) The water tank is old and holes have ...


2

I've never seen a burner assembly area that wasn't rusty, H2O is a byproduct of combustion. Things to consider: is the exhaust vent in good condition, is the TPR valve not leaking and in working order? Provided it's not in a location where a catastrophic leak would cause damage, ride it out. That being said, 12 years is getting towards the end of its life. ...


2

I did this very thing (replaced copper with PEX for baseboard heating). But I did this because my copper had frozen and split in about 200 places. So, if your copper is shot, I'd replace with PEX. But if the copper is fine, save the hassle! But if you do decide to do it, some tips: Sharkbite connectors are great and make it super easy to connect copper ...


2

15 years old, "heated the water nearly to the boiling point", and breaker tripping would tend to point to the bottom heating element in the tank becoming buried in sediment. Higher water temperatures accelerate sediment formation, and after all of the available surfaces become scaled with deposits, it is free to settle to the bottom of the tank. When it ...


2

I would definitely have the two circuit separated. In fact, they should have been from the start. If the water heater is a "standard" 4500 watt tank-type then a 20A breaker is not adequate anyway. You'd need #10 wire with a 30A two-pole breaker.


2

Okay, I needed to replace some damaged caulking in this shower stall, and this smell disappeared right after. I'm thinking some mold (or mildew, or any other fun guys that like to grow in shower stalls) gave off this smell when heated. As to why this needed re-caulking: I turn the shower to "hot" and turn it away from the shower stall door, towards the ...


2

Many homes suffer from low pressure/flow issues for various reasons. This regular drop in pressure/flow seems to indicate an external problem, such as a large water user (commercial or industrial) using water from your water main line for some automated process. Also, check with your water distribution entity to see if they have changed the way they ...



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