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24

There are two main and opposing risks: Too high, and users get scalded Too low, and you risk pathogens, particularly Legionella bacteria, which causes legionellosis (Legionnaires' disease) Minimum temperature Legionella risk According to the paper "Legionella and the prevention of legionellosis," found at the World Health Organization website, ...


9

Check out the 1 or 2 gallon point of use heaters that install under the sink. They run on 120VAC and are fairly easy to install with minimal plumbing changes. There are also above sink mounted hot taps that mount into the sprayer hole in the sink. These are usually used for hot water for coffee/tea etc. Both of these type products are available at your local ...


5

Water heaters have a dip tube on the cold water side that puts the cold water into the bottom of the tank. If water pressure is lost on the cold water side, the tank can siphon down through the cold water inlet till it reaches the bottom of the dip tube. Then since there's no water in the tank to absorb heat, the dip tube can melt and the tank can be ...


4

Depending on the specific system installation and type of tank it could be any of these: Cold in, hot out, and overflow: Standard water heater. Cold in, hot out, recirculate in. This configuration has diverse uses: typical for a solar water heating booster. In heavy use applications, it could be for an external hot water reservoir. In long lines ...


4

Fewer points of failure Bending results in fewer high risk failure points. A continuously bent pipe has 2 high risk failure points. Whereas a similar length of pipe made with a bunch of fittings, has 2 high risk failure points per fitting. Quieter Bending a radius will provide less resistance within the pipe, so water will flow smoother. In a ...


4

There are general guidelines for dealing with cuts in wood framing. For load bearing the basics are that you can notch 25% of the stud or 40% diameter for a hole. Note: Notches should not be square - this provides a weak point in the stud. Half circle your notches if you can. Now there are ways around this if you need a bigger notch or hole. In my ...


4

The most likely reason is a degraded/broken dip tube in the hot water heater. If this were the case, there would likely be little bits of plastic in your water, which perhaps could be seen if you removed a faucet aerator. To replace the dip tube, the cold water inlet must be removed, and the new tube installed. One related cause is if the inlet and outlet ...


4

It sounds like you are describing two different problems. FIRST PROBLEM: Turning off a hot water heater. First, there are two ways to hook up two water heaters: series and parallel. SERIES In series, the water comes in to the first water heater, then passes through the second hot water heater, and finally goes to your fixtures. If you turn off the ...


4

I'd suggest you use a watering can or pitcher to test where the drain tube goes before you crack the hot water heater drain. Pour a half-gallon to a couple of gallons down the tube and see if it shows up somewhere below. It probably should be more or less directly below in the basement, but it's always a good thing to check that it works before asking it to ...


3

Ranch experience says, shut off the power and the cold water inlet valve, drain the thing and leave it sit empty. Get out your biggest Dutch Oven, fill it with water, heat it and take sponge baths. If you're out of clothing, go to the nearest laundromat and process your smalls and whatever else you're running out of. Whatever this "Home Warranty" thing is, ...


3

Where is the tankless water heater to be located? If it is in a space that is heated, then freezing will not likely be a concern as there will be plenty of heat gain through the equipment enclosure. If freezing is still a concern, look for a tankless unit that has a electric element for freeze protection. This will use a lot of energy if the unit is located ...


3

Couple options come to mind: Change the fan. Change the fan speed. Change the fan connection to the vent. Dampen the vent. Change the size or length of the vent. If you can't or don't want to change the fan, then try dampening the vent by clamping it somewhere to the building structure and possibly adding some padding or pipe insulation where it makes ...


3

There are one user failure and 2 equipment fails that usually contribute to non lighting water heaters" User Not pressing down the pilot button long enough. After lighting the pilot flame initially, you must hold down the pilot button long enough (30 seconds) to allow the thermocouple (a detector of heat, which sents its signal to the main gas valve) to ...


2

Are there some specific reasons why people recommend bending long copper pipes, instead of cutting them into sections and joining them using U-joints, elbow-joints etc. ? Pipe fittings add resistance to the flow of the fluid in the pipe. This is usually expressed in terms of an equivalent pipe length for the different fittings (eg, elbows, tees, etc). ...


2

Bending copper has to be done with annealed copper. Rigid copper is too brittle can be done with either drawn or annealed copper. This table from copper.org does suggest slightly larger minimum radii for drawn pipe. thanks to @UNECS for prompting further research. You can make rigid copper easier to bend successfully by heating the area of the bend with a ...


2

It could be a loose fitting or the overpressure valve kicking in, but not likely. The tanks in most water heaters eventually corrode, how fast depends on a number of factors, one of which is the amount and type of minerals in the water, as well as its acidity. Once they do leak, repair is generally impractical and a new water heater is needed. In any ...


2

I just did a search for John Woods thermostat wiring and found the John Wood website. Then I used it, and your pictures to create the modified picture below. It looks to me like you have it wired right. Also, it looks like the original wiring was done so that both the upper and lower heating elements would be on at the same time. With it wired the way you ...


2

This answer is my opinion as a technician to the simple question: If my water heater is left on, and the water is shut off, will this damage the gas fired water heater if the hot water will not be used very much, or not at all? Considering you wont be using the water, and it will only be off for a short time there is no risk at all. You can also shut off ...


2

Before the use of pressure relief valves, homeowners were always urged to shut off the gas or electricity to a water heater which has the water cut off. The reasoning was simple: When the water heater came on to heat up its reservoir, it would cause the water to expand, and therefore pressurize, to the point where the tank or a pipe would rupture. As long ...


2

To be clear for future searchers: the nut is critical, it provides half of the electrical connection. A thermocouple requires two wires to function: electricity is generated at the junction of two different metals and two wires are needed for current to flow. While some thermocouples have two wires, the original poster is talking about a model with one ...


2

Time to call a professional; either a plumber or the local fire department. They can use more sophisticated leak detectors to pinpoint the leak, and know how to do so safely. Leaking gas is not something to trifle with. Liquid leak detectors (the type that bubble up when gasses are leaking) are great for simple threaded connections, but you've got a whole ...


2

You would gain... Sewer gas explosion. Never should sewer vents be exposed to any ignition source... In mines it's known as firedamp and it kills indiscriminately. All it takes is the proper ratio of flammable gas to oxygen and you have a fuel-air explosive. Sewer gas is vented to the atmosphere for several reasons: it displaces oxygen sulphide gasses ...


2

Installing a pan under a water heater is always a good idea. As a contractor, I have responded to many leaking tanks over the years and a drained pan would have made the situation a lot cheaper and easier for the customer. the leak is one thing, but the collateral damage is another. If you have clearance above the water heater, you could raise the level ...


1

Aside from adding an elbow, one method to allow finer mesh without blocking airflow is to extend the mesh a fair distance - I'll try to get a picture of Something similar, but doubt I can find the exact thing I'll want - basically either a long (12"/30cm or so) mesh tube, or a 12-18" section of pipe, drilled full of holes, and then wrapped in mesh small ...


1

Picture of the vents would help. The way I've usually seen them installed is with a 90deg elbow on the intake so that it points down. That would prevent snow from clogging it. The exhaust vent pipe usually has a 90 deg elbow so that it points up. You can get a rain cap for the end of it to keep rain/snow out. Looking at this document from your manufacturer ...


1

No, a water heater will continue to heat the water with a bad TPR valve. A failed TPR valve is a safety issue since the water heater could heat the water to the point that the tank explodes and does significant damage to your home, roof, and probably the home of your neighbors. Several other components would also have to fail for this extreme situation to ...


1

Thermal switches (depending on models) can be really tricky. If yours is really causing the problem I would suggest replacing it. However, before replacing the switch, ensure you have proper airflow into the combustion area. (Not much stacked around unit, any insulation properly installed, etc.) This really sounds like more of an air flow issue.


1

Tankless/on-demand (is this the same as inline?) water heaters only heat if the water flow rate is above some minimum, typically around 0.5 gallons per minute. As the water temperature is made more cold, less and less hot water is going into the mix. At some point, the hot water flow decreases below the threshold and the water heater turns off, yielding cold ...


1

'Gusting" of the combustion air can be caused if the shrouding around the base of heater is loose or missing. Such gusting can knock out the pilot. Another cause of pilot extinguishing is a too rapid start up of the main burner. Usually there is a small baffle around the pilot, protecting it. Too high a pressure of the gas would also cause a too large ...


1

For most threaded connections, first hand-tighten and then using a wrench, tighten in quarter-turn increments. If it leaks, give it another quarter turn. You shouldn't need excessive force with a wrench to tighten it. For anything other than compression fitting, use Teflon tape and/or pipe dope on the threads. Make sure that it is not cross threaded. If ...



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