Hot answers tagged

29

I'm from Serbia, just like the OP, and we do have such a myth there. After my initial rant, aimed at explaining why some of the safety assumptions that many answers here may have are wrong, I'll show installation of a typical water heater and explain a couple of issues that I see with the installation. (Feel free to skip this part) First, some background, ...


22

If the water heater is not properly grounded, it could be dangerous but then it would be dangerous all the time, not just when you take a shower. Sounds to me like a myth that got started because someone once was injured by a faulty water heater and then the myth took on a life of its own. If the water heater is wired properly you have nothing to fear. ...


15

Regardless of code, I like to get them off the floor just in case the basement floods. My preferred (and easily available anywhere) solution is a few solid concrete blocks; one under each foot. You can stack them if you want, too. This is an easy way to increase the height in 4" increments. I don't suggest using lumber. If your floor is the least bit ...


10

In the UK we have electric showers which heat water on demand - ie they're supplied with 230V using about 9kW, which is enough for a moderate flow of cold water to be heated to about 50C as it flows through the shower. Not only are they directly connected to the shower hose, they're usually inside the shower cubicle - so the unit gets wet and the electrical ...


9

Newer water heaters do not last as nearly as long as they used to. Nowadays, you are lucky to get 10 years out of one. This is due to the way they are manufactured. There are still some water heaters around that are from the 1960s that work perfectly fine. The tanks on some of those heaters are made out of copper, and won't corrode like modern steel tanks. ...


9

Answer to Question asked originally That appears to be unused piping that goes nowhere now. The valves were shutoffs for whatever was that direction. The pipes appear to be capped now, meaning the valves have no function now. Answer to question as Edited These pipes and valves still have no purpose. Take the picture you posted to your maintenance people ...


8

Check the manufacturer's installation instructions for the heater. As far as I'm aware, a gas appliance only has to be raised off the floor if there's a possibility of flammable vapors being near it (e.g. in a garage). IRC P2801.6 Water heaters installed in garages. Water heaters having an ignition source shall be elevated such that the source of ...


7

I have never heard of such a thing, and in the USA the water heater is usually tucked away in some hard-to-access place like a basement or utility closet. Turning it on and off all the time would be totally impractical. I know in some other countries it is typical to have the water heater installed in the kitchen or bathroom.


6

Electric resistance water heaters are only slightly more efficient (better insulation is the only reason) now than they were then. From that point of view you could apply an insulation overwrap and be money ahead. If the tank is solid and you check and/or replace the anode regularly (and flush the bottom) to keep it that way, you may simply be benefitting ...


6

It looks pretty obvious to me. Whoever installed the water heater vent intentionally scored the drywall to make a hole for the vent to pass through. I can see the square cut made by a utility knife and they used a hammer to break out the drywall. Then whoever installed the vent did not finish the job by repairing the drywall keeping proper clearances etc. ...


5

60°C (140°F) is the recommended minimum, as at that temperature Legionella bacteria is killed within 32 minutes. At 66°C (151°F), Legionella bacteria dies instantly. If you feel this is too hot, yet still want to be safe. You can set the tank heater to 151°F, then install thermostatic mixing valves. These can be in the form of point of use "anti-scald" ...


5

1984! You are now the proud owners of a historic landmark! Many circumstances effect how long a water heater can last. The maintenance it was given (as you suggested), but mostly what material was used and their quality to manufacture the parts are the surest way to predict the lifespan of any product. You also heard correctly; at the very most todays mid-...


5

For water heaters, the warranty duration is an indication of approximately how long the included anode rod will last before it needs to be replaced to preserve its protective qualities. Since almost nobody replaces their water heater's anode rod, the number of years listed on the warranty can actually be taken to show about how long the unit will last. For ...


5

In any administration where internationally recognised regulatory rules are used and means are provided to ENSURE that all except a few rogue installations are installed to the standards then the risk of electric shock from such installations is extremely small. I have never heard of such an installation causing shock or death in New Zealand (where I live). ...


4

Not likely will it be possible to replace the two 30A breakers with 40A breakers. The wire size (AWG) for a 30A circuit should be 10 gauge. Proper wire size for a 40A circuit is 8 gauge if the run from the service entrance to the tankless heater is a reasonably short distance. So do not simply replace the breakers like you asked. The breaker's primary ...


4

Any leak large enough to stop the water from filling the heater tank would have to be so large as to basically be an open ended line. It would be impossible not to notice the flooding caused by a leak this large. A smaller leak would not stop the heater from filling and operating and you would have some hot/warm water delivery. I am not saying you don't have ...


4

A - Expansion tank. This prevents the pressure increase due to heating water, from damaging the plumbing. The tank is filled with air, that is separated from the water by a bladder. When the water expands due to heating, water compresses the air absorbing the pressure. B - Check valve (or back flow valve). This is designed to only allow water to flow in one ...


4

I am guessing from your pictures that it is an air intake - I don't see any signs of air/moisture above the venting. It is perfectly acceptable to pull air from your attic for a furnace. In fact some might presuppose that by pulling the attic air you are increasing airflow in your attic. As a home owner I would like to see a screen on it so that critters ...


4

He's talking about a combustion air intake. Fuel burning appliances are not allowed to draw combustion air from habitable rooms. So it's possible that a combustion air intake may be required. Check with your local building department, to determine if one is required in your situation. If the dryer vent and the heater exhaust through the same duct, that's ...


4

Yes. If you run the heater without water, the elements will burn out. Unless the heater has a safety limit, that prevents it from running empty.


3

I've recently had a problem with my gas water heater turning off frequently. When I called the manufacturer, they asked if I had a dryer in the same room. My answer was, "yes, the dryer sits next to the water heater in an open room of the basement." The rep said that was most likely the problem. When hot water heaters are in the same room with dryers, over ...


3

The white pipe at the top left appears to have a thermostatic mixer valve. That's the output side of the water heater. To avoid running out of hot water too quickly, the tank is set to a somewhat higher temperature than is actually desired, and this valve mixes that with cold water to get the actual temperature and sends that to the rest of the house. The ...


3

No: water heaters are designed to be left on 24/7/365. You might turn one off if you're leaving for a vacation to save energy, but safety isn't part of the decision.


3

No disrespect to you or your plumber, but I would be suspicious of any person who is able to predict the demise of an appliance by reading mineral andiron deposits in an aerator screen. It is common after replacing a water heating tank (or doing any work on the plumbing) for debris such as hard water minerals, silt and bits of metal and rust to break free ...


3

Safest and easiest repair is to purchase a replacement at the hardware store. It isn't worth trying to repair a part that primarily functions as a safety device. You may need to replace the valve if your existing thermocouple isn't removable or if the warranty is expired, bite the bullet and replace with a new unit.


3

The black stuff should've been from the new Water Heater installation & should've cleared right up. The Plumber likely had to shut-off the building's water & the valve had some deposits scraped off from operation of the valve. But, the hot water running out so quickly is pointing to a hot water line leak. Since it wasn't noticed by anyone you could ...


3

Pressure from the cold side is higher than from the hot side, so cold water is backfeeding through the circulator and on to the hot side to the faucets in use. Close the shutoffs you have for the circulator and the problem should go away.


3

You could just run the water for as long as you think it would take. Probably would have to run the hot until the water runs cold, then a little longer. This would basically ensure the water heater is cleared and the piping before it. The cold wouldn't have to be ran as long, but your goal is to still clear the pipes out. The best way to know that you've ...


3

Possibly the tank leaks. But it is far more likely that one of the through-hole connections is loose. Check those before blaming the manufacturer: Inlet (cold supply) Outlet (hot output) cleanout drain heating unit Well, I suppose if the heating unit is causing the leak, blame the manufacturer. The top connections are easily checked by stuffing a ...


3

Turn off the water heater at its controls. Close the gas valve to the water heater (WH) or shut off power to it. Open the hot water faucet at the kitchen sink and tub or shower in order to purge all the hot water in the tank, let it run until it is cold, and then shut of all the faucets you opened. Go to the WH and shut off the water supply valve to the ...



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