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4

Yes, it's possible to bench solder, and in fact you should generally avoid soldering on an assembled threaded assembly. "Oven soldering" is a completely absurd approach to plumbing. Save it for your SMT electronics projects. If you are very uncomfortable about soldering, just use threaded pipe (steel, brass, stainless steel...) and threaded fittings.


4

It's mostly the gas pipe. A tankless water heater is going to need a 1" or even 1.5" pipe to feed it. Your current water heater probably uses a 1/2" pipe. The new pipe probably needs to come off the main trunk, and replacing it requires a precise gas volume calculation and gas plumbing work that is very skilled labor and not cheap. If your plumber can't do ...


3

Yes, it's good possibility that if you don't purposefully depressurize the lines first, you will get spray. But this is easy to do. Turn off the hot water heater. If it's electric, there is usually an off position on the knob on the front, or turn it off at the breaker panel. If it's gas, just turn the knob to pilot. Turn off the cold water supply to the ...


2

I had a family friend who's a professional come out and he cleaned off the igniter a little more thouroughly than I had, and that solved the issue. A happy ending!


2

Water heaters do not live forever. Start shopping. While it is possible that you have a leaky fitting near the water heater, (which could be fixed) the most common cause for a leaky water heater is that the water heater itself has started to fail, and the only option there is replacement, as the corroded tank is not a replaceable part. Depending where you ...


2

The manual will say something like Flushing the heat exchanger with a descaling solution if mineral build up is evident. Scale build up will shorten the life of the water heater, descale heat exchanger thoroughly and repeat annually depending on mineral content of ground water. (From Bosch 2400E NG user manual) or maybe something like Periodic ...


2

Probably won't make any noticeable difference. Normally the bottom of the water tank portion is insulated if electric, and not remotely in contact with the floor if fuel-fired (there's a burner between the bottom of the tank and the floor, and a substantial amount of space taken up by the burner assembly.) I'd save the idea until you were replacing the ...


1

By design it is always filled to capacity, it is a pressure tank. Do not mess with the relief valve, it is there to prevent the tank from exploding due to malfunction causing overheating (if you are curious about that just do an internet search of boiler explosions). Do not turn off the water supply and drain the tank without also turning off the heat source ...


1

I've not used a system like you have, but I'll give you some information based on what's common for heating systems in the UK. As you've discovered, the immersion switch immediately switches the heater on. It's usually used as an override when you want water to start heating outside the timed period. (I'd hazard a guess that having the immersion on for 10 ...


1

The same defect happened to me a few years ago on my gas water heater. Hot water would last only a few minutes and then only cold water would be coming out. The cause of my problem was that my dip tube, which send the incoming cold water from the top of the heater down to the bottom, was broken somewhere close to the top. After the tube sends new cold ...



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