New answers tagged

-2

This is an easy answer with the information provided. It is new Take it back!. This the best advice I can give as a licensed electrician, & having universal HVAC lincences.


2

Muralo's Spackle™ shrinks as it dries. If you keep applying thin layers and letting them dry, you will eventually achieve a flat surface. If the Spackle is proud of the surrounding surface you should be able to sand it flat.


2

The brand name on the can doesn't really matter, as long as the products are compatible. Read the labels, if your paint says that it cleans up with soap and water you should be able to use it over any type of primer.


0

Simple fix...Go to your nearest Lowes and buy theses commercial toggles... these are the only ones I use on Stone fireplace tv mounting but work great with sheetrock. They hold up to 280lbs per toggle. However they are expensive.


1

I am not a lawyer. Pro-tip for renters and landlords: unless the security deposit is keep, by it self, in a separate escrow account, you WILL be getting/giving the deposit back IN FULL. What if a landlord does not properly hold a security deposit? If a landlord does not hold a tenant’s security deposit in the proper type of account or fails to ...


3

You can try with soapy water. But - having removed a lot of paint, what you're hoping for is probably impossible. Even if you get the glow-in-the-dark stuff off, doing so will roughen up the underlying paint to the point that repainting is necessary. You are stuck repainting, the question is whether you'd rather DIY or pay the landlord to do it. First,...


2

Based solely on typical building practices and my assumptions about your home^, the green wall is likely not load-bearing and can be removed. The doorways can almost certainly be exchanged, providing that you implement the same structural header arrangement that the existing door has now. It's unlikely that there's a post in that location, though there may ...


1

hard to say without knowing more about the floor plan. Maybe they're in a longer section of floor. Maybe there are plumbing fixtures that required a shift in layout. Who knows? It doesn't much matter whether you use one header or three, but you'll want trimmer studs supporting it or them between each pair of doors. Otherwise you'd need to size the header ...


2

It's book-matched panels. I can't tell from the photo whether it's veneer, plywood, or hardwood. Looks like kinda like european walnut, not pine/plywood... but without a closer look at the edges, I really couldn't say. As far as affordable options...


4

Those are match grain veneer panels. They are usually made by attaching selected hardwood veneers to plywood using contact glues. Veneers can be purchased from specialty woodworking dealers. The technique is not hard but requires some care (and practice) to get straight, bubble-free surfaces.


0

I see rafters in your pics, not trusses. Regardless, in general, you are right that bearing walls don't normally run parallel to the rafters. If it were load bearing, there should be a kneewall (2X4's) built from the rafters or a header down to the double plate you spoke off. Also, in the basement level, you would see a beam with posts to the footers ...


0

That looks like poorly-adhering paint to me, possibly on top of a crack in the plaster. You'll need to remove all the loose paint you can find. Then, feather the sharp edges of paint with a thin layer of plaster, prime, and paint the wall.


2

I'd tap the rest of the wall and see really how much you need to repair. From the photo it looks as though you will have another inch or two upwards and at least another inch going down. This is a really easy fix though. You can get a tub of mud (plaster patch) at any home improvement, hardware or even your local department store and even large grocery ...


0

The pocket door that is dragging the floor is the best indicator perhaps of what is going on. If it is original to the house means one thing, if it is a newer install as in not original means something different. If painting the wall covers the crack you are asking about, tells me they are very small and there is most likely no concern. Old houses move, ...


-1

Sometimes the cracks can be a indication of termites or carpenter ants damaging a small section. It can also be an indication of a leak in the wall. I would start by inspecting the exterior footings looking for critter damage. If there is no evidence of critters or leaks, and no change in the exterior siding (cracking or bowing) is this above the area that ...


1

Flexible "putty knives" find more application when performing operations such as doing drywall taping. Particularly when larger width blades are used such as 6", 8" or 10" sizes. Smaller sized blades in the 1" to maybe 2.5" sized are more often used with the stiffer blade for operation such as spackling over small areas. I have found it invaluable to ...


1

The best way to deal with this problem is to first mount a suitable piece of 3/4" plywood on the wall such that it spans to studs where it can be securely attached. The TV mount can then be mounted to the plywood using suitable screws that go into properly sized pilot holes. Note that face screwing into the plywood provides an excellent and strong mount ...


2

I would use a surface mount wire mold like this or a stick on one. It would protect the fiber and look better than sticking a wire on the wall. Make sure not to bend the fiber two tightly or it will break.


0

You can basically assume that anything alive that's attached to a structure is an equivalent weight of water, and that it will swell and shrink with temperature accordingly. On a long enough timeline, it will compromise the mortar, even if the bricks are fine. In an area with a lot of freeze-thaw cycles, that timeline gets much shorter.


0

Stick lightweight insulation panels to the back of mobile/wheeled shelving units (or if you have no need for shelving, which would seem odd, just fill the units with insulation and cover the faces.) The floor and ceiling either need to be VERY uniform/flat, or you need a sizable flexible weatherstrip to fill the larger gap that's required if they are not ...


0

Alternative suggestion: a PVC plastic strip wall curtain, like they use for step in refrigerator/freezers in food plants, butchers areas in grocery stores (not sure if you call it a shop, kitchen, or meat locker) or some resturants.


2

Because your temp differential is relatively high (72˚F vs 35˚F), and you're talking about a relatively large area (I assume, because you talk about accordion "walls"), unless you have a fairly powerful air conditioner or very good wall insulation, your cooling requirements will be challenging. If it's important that the wall be an accordion wall, then I ...


1

Purchase a towel bar to your liking that has the bar as a separate piece, longer than the spacing you need. Cut the bar to the length you need and install. I have had to cut the bar on occasion when the space was too small for the bar on the wall, so I made it shorter.The same idea should work for you.



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