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A $15 bucket of drywall compound (mud) and a wide drywall knife, a wall sanding block and some drywall sanding screens. Even as a temporary fix, unless you want to hang up a chalkboard as suggested in the comments, the skim-coat of drywall mud will get the job done as quickly and easily as it can be done. If you'll be doing the work in 3 months, it will also ...


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I've had this same problem before and found it difficult to find replacement material that matches. In Texas it rains heavy and the high humidity keeps these surfaces wet. If the rot is low enough to the floor, run a chalk line across horizontally. Cut of the rot with a circular saw,(adjust the depth of the blade so it doesn't cut the 2x4 wall behind) then ...


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If you're using a metal detector maybe your wall is plaster on wire lath, there's such a thing as electric heat elements embedded in walls or maybe steel studding. You need to know what your wall construction is, and do you mean 3.5mm holes for screws?


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If you can relocate your valve to a point opposite an interior wall, you can run it inside that wall to any depth you like, accessing the joint through the sheet-rock of the interior wall, and then closing that access with sheet-rock or installing a service door.


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All exterior walls of the original building are load bearing. You can, however open up an exterior wall as long as you install a properly sized header to bridge the opening and support the header with jack studs. Depending on which way the floor joists (two story) or ceiling joists (single story) are oriented, you may need to install a temp support beam that ...


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If it's an old gable wall it is probably just load bearing like you said in the middle. The old gable roof wall should be removed to reduce weight and a ceiling joist will probably need to be added. BUT.... With that addition anything could be going on.


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It's quite easy to check that something is at a particular angle. Just put the appropriately sized block on your level at the appropriate distance, and make your level (with the block) level. Your off-level surface makes a right triangle with respect to an imaginary (or provided by your level) level surface. The level is the "adjacent" side of the angle, ...


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It's much easier to check that something is level than to check that something is 6 degrees or 1/4 inch higher. Build it level. Then add a 1/4 inch strip of wood (a length of lath or trim) across the inside edge of the horizontal framing member. You are correct that the sleeve will be sitting on two edges, the added trim strip and the outside edge of the ...


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Like drywall, many types of wood paneling come in 4' x 8' panels. That means you should have seams with finishing nails along every third stud. You could try carefully popping out a few nails in the middle of a panel to see what's behind it. If you're careful enough, you can just tap the nails back in when you're done. But use caution: those finishing nails ...


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Drill a screw in the wall. Pull it out. See if it has white flakes on it.


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If there are electrical outlets, remove one and look. otherwise you need to remove a section of panelling or drill a hole and observe what comes out. Odds are pretty good it's just panelling, speaking to typical practices in garage remodels.


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Adding a 1" gap behind the XPS creates a dead air space that adds to the R value of the overall insulation. This is a standard recommendation with sheet foam insulation. It does assume that you have a good seal at all joints. If you have a moisture seepage problem, this doesn't add to it. if the walls are damp, they are damp. You should be considering ...


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Shirlock's advice is good but I want to add a few things: You need to regrade plus move spout out. However I think you have more than a standing water problem. The water damage is pretty high up and it is pointing me to thinking that your gutters are not functioning . I think your flashing may not be tucked over the gutters or something else. We don't ...


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I see that you have posted two questions about this situation. I fear you have to address a couple of problems here. First and foremost is to try to route water away from this area. We can address this in another segment with more info on the area in question. As far as the immediate problem, I am pretty sure you will have to remove the damaged sections of ...


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I had a similar bed my Dad made for me after I fell in love with my friends as a pre-teen. He attached only two sides by bolts to the walls, thick walls of redwood as a bed frame, to surround me in bed, the other two sides came out and met flush like crown molding. My bed was in a corner. But the outstanding corner, where much of the weight was balanced ...


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At 23 feet, there is no way to build it with a continuous sill or plate. i would also assume in that 23 foot span there may be a few doors? The first step would be to lay a sill plate on the floor on a chalk line and secure it with framing nails or screws. Now you can lay out where your doors are going to live. If you really want to build the walls on the ...


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A continuous top and bottom plate are preferred, and longer 2x4 or 2x6's are available for this. If you need to breakup the wall, then make two separate walls and nail them together, to the floor, and with a staggered top plate. When possible, you want to end the wall near a corner to give the joint more support. Also try to stagger top plates near corners ...


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Agreeing with Comintern. So long as you're up to code, greater stud distance and even screw spacing (yes, that's right) will give you a higher STC (sound transmission coefficient) by decreasing connection points for sound to travel through the wall. The screw spacing is more important for the second layer since it physically connects the studs to the outside ...


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Orginally from this twitter:https://twitter.com/craigstone_/status/446315965135851520/photo/1 We have "make art with cables":


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I'd be tempted to run all the wiring along your existing (brick or concrete?) wall(s), put up studs just thick for whatever conduits and junction boxes you're using, then put drywall on the studs, essentially building a new wall over the old. The room will lose a few inches but the final result should look perfect.


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When someone says surface wiring, the first thought that seems to pop into almost everyone's head is something with all the panache of this: This doesn't have to be. What about building a cover over wiring which looks like a fireplace mantel or deluxe shelf? It could serve multiple purposes depending on its depth: bar, furniture-wall protector, ...


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One option might be a product like FlatWire (I have no affiliation with this company/product). This is a flat flexible wire that adheres to your wall and can be painted over. They have audio and data variants as well. The wire intended for lighting is low voltage and needs to be used with compatible transformers and lights. While more expensive and ...


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There are really no products that allow for surface wiring that look decent at all. Almost all of it is ugly and distracting from a nice looking wall. With all that said you really only have a couple of options. First off you could work out how to get the wires inside the wall even if that is way more work than you had anticipated. Often the "right" ...



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