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You may have to get a ladder, assuming you don't have one tall enough. You could decorate the rest of the wall with more smoothie but painting would probably be the best bet. :) If you do paint, test on some lower stains first and give them at least a day to see if the stains bleed through the paint. It would be safer to just use some Kilz primer to seal ...


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You're going to need some way to rip material to width. Cheapest would be a hand-held circular saw, and a long straight-edge & clamps (or steady hand). Better option would be a table or radial arm saw.


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For tools: I own a Porter Cable FN250B 16 gauge brad nailer and it's great for this type of application. It costs more but you will also get a range from 3/4 to 2 1/2 inches. It is on Amazon for a $140 ($92 used). I'd recommend selecting the material before buying the miter saw. A ten inch saw is only going to handle up to six inch material, so if you ...


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If you are fixing this to a wall with drywall on it, you will need 2 1/2" long finish nails to toenail it with, at the tongue edge. If you are staining it, DO NOT face nail it. If you are painting it, well nail it anywhere you please. The wood you are planning to use will work very well, make sure it will give you the look you want by making a sample, say 3' ...


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Stock fitting - Male Pipe Thread to sweat (ie, soldered copper) Solder to a section of pipe, screw in, enjoy.


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If you live in a cold climate where the blocks are at risk of cracking from the freeze/thaw cycle, then I would recommend using a caulk that is specifically designed for concrete block. The color of the caulk will be pretty close to the color of unpainted concrete when it cures, and isn't very noticeable. I repaired a few cracks in my garage with the same ...


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Before you patch it, I would recommend making sure it isn't moving any more. One common method is to epoxy a small piece of glass across the crack; if the crack is moving, it will break the glass.


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Rockler also sells plans and hardware kits for several variations on hidden beds, including one specifically intended as a desk/bed combo. I'm sure there are many other woodworking suppliers who offer the same kits or similar ones.


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Lee Valley -- Hiddenbed™ Bed/Desk Hardware Kit -- http://www.leevalley.com/US/hardware/page.aspx?p=72053&cat=53&ap=1 might be suitable. (And not $5K.)


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Well first of all it would be really helpful if we could see the picture. But from what I heard there are two possible scenarios: the patch is flat with the rest of the wall. In this case you should apply 2,3 or maybe even more layers of smoothing primer, and then sand it off with extra fine sand paper; also you can apply last layer or two on the surrounding ...


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It's hard to completely eliminate signs of a patch. Try to get the patch as level with the rest of the wall for starters. You're still going to have some irregularities from the mud but if you feather it out it's less noticeable. Just mud the outside of the patch for now. Do multiple light coats until you get out to a 12" taping knife. That should leave a ...


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Load bearing walls typically run perpendicular to the floor and ceiling joists. So if you can figure out which direction those run in, any wall perpendicular to that has a good change of being load-bearing. If there is a crawlspace you can access, that's an easy way to determine floor-joist direction. You can also spot the support pillars/poles underneath ...


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According to the response from Shannon @ house-improvements.com (he's the pro who owns the site): Yes that is for sure [the wall is load bearing]. Three things tell me that: there is a concrete footing (dotted lines) under that wall. there is a note about a header in that door opening. the span of those joists over to the main beam is to ...


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I really like your ideas but can also understand the previous suggestion of having something that you can use with one hand. I had a couple of ideas. One is to use large hooks intended for bicycles or tools. Here's one example (below in red) but they make different sizes and shapes. Another smaller makeshift solution would be to get one of type ...


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There is a product sold by Sherwin Williams its a solvent based spackleing its similar to joint compound but it bonds a lot better than Sheetroc mud and dries very hard very much like plaster.


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What you have suggested are great ideas, but perhaps a bit overkill (unless you intend to hang full reusable grocery bags, gallon of milk included). The best solution I've come across in similar storage searches, is to create a decorative, but sturdy rail, mounted on your wall. They make similar systems for garages that are effectively modular, and ...


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There are millions of available types of coat hooks, most of which will look a lot nicer than the carabiners you proposed. The trouble with both of your suggestions is that they require two hands to get things off... one hand to unclip them and the other hand to remove the object. As such they will eventually drive you crazy.


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Everything Chris said is true...but I’m not sure if the note box gives us information about mentioned wall or different one.It't hard to tell from the drawing, at least for me...I don't know the standards in your country, and if house is built according to regulations, but bearing walls should be either vertical or horizontal (I mean one or another direction ...


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EDIT: On second look, the drawing actually tells us. There's a note box to the right: TYP BEARING WALL 2x4 stud 16" O.C. on Continuous footing. The dashed line around the wall indicates the footing. ORIGINAL: If I'm reading the drawing correctly, IT DEFINITELY IS. For the sake of this discussion, north is the top of the drawing. There appears to be a ...


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Well, anything is possible, we really don’t have any info how does the house look like (technically speaking).I am working with one prefabricated house at the moment so I can tell you how does it look like in my case: back in a factory they make the whole panel with everything ready inside including plastic pipes through which later on thy place cables. So ...


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It's going to depend on the type of framing used. Balloon and platform framing are the two common methods. Platform If you're dealing with platform framing, you're going to have to drill through quite a bit to go between floors. First you'll hit the bottom plate of the upper wall, followed by the decking (subfloor). Next you'll hit a double top plate, ...


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If you do opt to go with 1/8" ply, I'd suggest you use "washer head pocket screws" (1-1/4" if you have 1/2" drywall). If you're putting the sheets of ply sideways, I'd use a screw every foot or so on each stud. That might be slight overkill, but my thinking is to mimic the fastening of a sheet of normal drywall, which (a) needs to support the weight, and (b) ...


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It looks like your screw is integral to the bracket so a larger screw is not an option... I think I would use a larger plug that fits snugly in the hole (either plastic or lead), then break off a couple of wooden match sticks in it so the bracket screw grips relatively well. Then coach whoever pulled too hard on the curtain! LOL.


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I had the same issue with my curtains. I was able to use the Tapcon concrete 3/16” by 2-1/4” concrete anchors. If your holes are too large for the Tapcons: try drilling out the hole to a ½ inch in diameter and about two inches deep. Then add some construction glue and pound in a ½ inch dowel. You can then reattach the curtain hangers with wood screws.


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Just from the pictures it looks like a bad install. The cracks look like they are rolled. They aren't on any parts of the structure where there are two joints meeting or any sort of weak point. They are basically right in the middle of a wood framed exterior. [Remember this advice is just based on me looking at a couple pictures and from what you said ...


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Go ahead and put that wall right on under that beam. The beam is a bearing surface for what is up above the beam. The wall you are adding is a non bearing wall that will not hinder the bearing capacity of the beam. Nail it in place using standard nailing practice. In other words, don't load it up with no more nails than you need, one nail staggered every ...


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First you need to figure out if the ceilings are considered a firewall. If they are they must be 5/8 inch type X. If not I would suggest one of the two: 1/2" gypsum ceiling board - ceiling board is simply drywall rated to have less sag and less pulling properties. This is normally what we use on jobs. It is not always available at big box in all ...


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Depends on the ceiling/wall function. In most cases for repairs you want to replicate what was there, unless you are ripping the entire wall/ceiling or it's too hard to track down matching replacement drywall. If the wall/ceiling is a firewall, you normally need to replace the structure that was there, which may be double-layer 5/8 type X ("firecode") ...


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If this were my wall I would: Scrape off all loose paint. Sand area with sanding block - heavy grit. Feather in joint compound. Do another coat. Sand area until flat. Prime beyond damaged area. Repaint.


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If the blocks get wet when your insulation boards are up, and they dry again when you remove them, that points to the boards being the determining factor. Those boards insulate the blocks, so they're kept colder than they would be if they were uninsulated from your house's heating system. Colder walls can (and in this case apparently do) get below the dew ...


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I have had this problem. The block on my basement wall was not sealed. When it would rain for a very long time it would eventually saturate the block and start to soak through. The blocks would fill up with water and it would take weeks to dry. Use seal or paint to seal the block that is exposed to the weather and it should help.


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Scratch and Brown Stucco Base Coat: quikrete.com or specmix.com We just did a few sections of our +100yo basement walls, same story. We also opted to not use the wire mesh; to the angst of the old guy working at the store, nor a second coat. It's a basement, no one cares. It just needed some attention. If the only option was a tripart system, it would still ...


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This Old House's website advises getting a sample of the current plaster and mortar to s lab so you can get them accurately matched, if I remember correctly. They seemed to be saying that it was important that the brick and mortar be matched to each other, tho I'm not sure why..


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The concrete should be etched and a paint specifically made for exterior concrete used. Sherwin-Williams has specially acrylics for concrete and etching solutions as do other leading manufacturers. Either of those cleaners containing phosphorus, will clean and remove oils. Etching opens pores in the concrete providing something to bond to and removes the ...


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Not critical at all. There are best practices. Like making sure corners have stud surface on both sides, making all studs 16 on center, make all studs plumb. Does it matter? No. Do inspectors care? No. Now I wouldn't suggest making your studs further than 16 inches but back in the day they were generally 24 for basements. I have seen people do them ...


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An inch out is not that big of a deal, though an inspector might not want to see it. If you can Add a stud, Can you not just fix it so it is straight? I will use construction screws with pre-drilled holed when I have a tricky placement that needs a bit of finessing. Attaching a second stud to it would also make that one out of plumb, but would suffice the ...


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There are several stuffs you can do to your exterior painting job, as well as help keep the paint look new for longer. See these top 10 ways you can do your paintwork and protect it over time. Ensure That Exterior Surfaces Are Fully Inspected Before Painting. Check The Exterior Walls And Surfaces For Signs Of Weather Damage. Prep The Surface Walls Before ...



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