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Correct me if I'm wrong but from what I see floor level in the next room is higher than the one in the garage? If that is the case this could be either forced out solution (so garage slab wouldn't be too high for a car to come in) either very handy one. Handy because in case of some flood or whatever in a garage water wouldn't come right away in your home. ...


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It is only an issue if it is load bearing. If it is load bearing then you cannot have part of your footing floating (in the first picture it definitely looks like the bottom plate is outside of concrete). Period. Is it a thing that has to get fix right away? No. Engineer will give you advice on fix. It is just a wall though and shouldn't be too costly. ...


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From your pictures, it looks like it's just the baseboard that's overhanging the slab, not the wall itself. That's fine. Kinda weird to have baseboard there anyway. Even if the drywall is overhanging the slab, that's fine too (though a bit ugly and unprofessional). Only if the actual wood framing of the wall itself is overhanging the slab might you possibly ...


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Floor first. Tile. Cut out the the bottom of the drywall so that the tile can sit underneath it. Throw some cardboard on top of your tile, sit tile board on tile and put it up. Pull out cardboard. Caulk the gap. You are done and everything looks perfect.


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Seems kinda like washing a car....from the top down. Once that NEW pretty tile is on the floor, you will have to protect it for the remainder of the project. Dirty boots, dropped tools, grout drips all will have to be guarded against to avoid damage.


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The general consensus is that for the purpose of quality, it's best to do the floor first. But, a professional tiler will do the walls first most of the time, so they can get the job done faster. After you do the floor, you can't do the walls until the floor sets.


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In general you have the right idea with placing insulation between the thermal masses of two brick layers. This will work well in any climate. However, you can make some improvements. Here are a couple I can think of: Use thicker insulation. 5cm may not be enough. Shoot for 10 cm. Result: lower heating and cooling bills, greater interior comfort. Plaster ...


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I would not add drywall over plaster, as the guy said before. You have to not only look at the depth of electrical outlets, but now your door jambs are the wrong size, and window sills and trim will all have to be redone.


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My home has a mix of 1/2 and 5/8 drywall on the ceiling and it is completely related to the spacing of the ceiling joists. If they are 16 on center, the builder used 1/2. If they are wider than 16, then they used 5/8. The 5/8 will prevent sagging between wider ceiling joists.


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It's un-mortared blocks. No particular effort beyond that should be required, unless it's lined with plastic that needs holes poked in it. Every joint between blocks is a drainage point.


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I have seen tension shelves popular for kids lockers but I don't think they go bigger than about 18" but try Google for locker shelf's


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Pull-up bars sound elegantly ingenious to me. But if this is a dead space in a hallway that would never really serve a better purpose than having a shelf, consider installing a real shelf mounted with brackets; one that you'll leave when you move out. No damage: improvements!


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I've wondered this before, too. Honestly I wouldn't trust a horizontal tension rod shelf unless you're putting lightweight, and not breakable, things on it. I know you're renting, but you could install shelves with braces and then just patch the holes when you leave, assuming you can find similar paint. Another alternative is just something like ...


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Its unlikely you can remove those walls. In any case, would you really start knocking down walls in your house based on what random people on a forum wrote?


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It can be kind of hard to tell from photos. Your house plans (blueprints) would tell you for sure, presuming the house was built faithfully to the plans. You really should have a good look at the plans, or get somebody knowledgeable to look at this in person. Or both. Do you know which direction the joists are running? Floor and ceiling joists will be ...


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Some cowboy it and hope they don't hit anything. Others cut enough holes in the drywall (and/or floor, if carpeted) to see what they are doing. If using a camera system, those can be pretty small holes. Drywall repair is a heck of a lot cheaper than plumbing and electrical repair.


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Select a location between studs where the space does not contain any electricial devices, and it seems that it would not contain pipes devices. Drill through the top plate with a larger drill bit, of 'standard' length. Put a dowel, or single piece of solid wire in the hole until it touches the bottom. Tap both walls and both studs in the space while you ...



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