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2

The outside corners of your walls have metal "drywall corner bead". (There's also paper and plastic.) Sometimes, though rare, there's metal bead in the inside corners. The corner bead itself is relatively thin, but if you're trying to get through it, either with a drill bit or a screw, you'll need to push reasonably forcefully. If you don't, the bead can ...


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Unless it's a new construction home, it's unlikely to have metal studs. I think you're finding protection plates, covering wires or pipes, running through wood studs. That would be why you aren't finding all the studs to hold the magnet along their entire vertical lengths. Where you are finding it to hold throughout, is probably metal corner bead.


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In residential wood construction today, shear walls are almost always constructed of plywood panels specially nailed to the framing. They are common on exterior walls since there is often plywood sheathing anyways, although they can be interior. The diagonal piece shown in the photo may be a remnant of construction Unlike vertical load-bearing walls, shear ...


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I'm no expert, but AFAIK, the frame of a shear wall is (by definition) clad with plywood, OSB, or somesuch, not just with sheetrock. From the looks of the chunks of sheetrock on the floor and remaining on the frame (top center), only sheetrock appears to have been removed on “this” side (exposing the framing we can see). The other side, which we can only see ...


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Option 1 A less expensive option if you don't mind having a plate behind the refrigerator is to put a 3 gang blank plate over the existing 3 gang switch box. Then feed out of it with the necessary wires to the other side. The electrical is pretty basic as all you would be doing is extending the switch loops/legs to the new 3 gang box. You do not ...


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I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


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This shows that ivy can actually be of benefit and also protect a building whilst also keeping heat in in winter and keeping it cooler in summer etc... http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1278430/Why-ivy-creeping-walls-home-actually-protect-building-thanks-thermal-shield.html


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First, an answer because I realize some people just cannot get this stuff. If it were me, I would build the wall like normal with a continuous double 2x4 top plate and just shoot about 6 +/- nails with our gun through the top section of the studs into the drywall. Second, a thought. What would the weight be from on that wall. Maybe a person pushing off ...


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I'm having trouble visualizing the whole layout. That said I also have knee walls and sloped ceilings. I was able to force attic baffle vents between the insulation and roof by taping them together, then pushing them up with 1x2 sticks. It's not perfect I'm sure, but does allow some ventilation from behind the kneewall to the main attic. Of course, I have ...


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I would simply ask if you can have two beams on each wall that hit the ceiling. These could span to the 1/3 mark on the walls and would keep it from flexing. Simple 4x4 would probably look the best and should still pass fire code.


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I would put a small header across the entire 78" opening back nailing the header through the existing king studs, then put a single jack stud on either side at the exact width I need.


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In my opinion this should be done 3 times per span at a minimum. So really it depends what you are building with. If you use your stock 2x4s that are 8 feet then 3. But If you get longer 2x4s I think you can also go with 3, given there are no breaks. (This is also assuming that you can fasten the bottom every couple feet)


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Don't worry about the cracks but you do have to patch where it's crumbly. Only worry about the paint that comes off easily, no need to scrape down the whole thing. Depending on the look you're going for, the whole wall would need a skim coat of plaster. Condemned, eh? Does the roof leak? Did it? (sad face) If you are going to contract it out, start ...


1

Honestly, I would imagine your walls will be just fine with a little water running over them. The stone walls all over the Irish countryside have been standing for a year or two and seem to cope with the wet, cold North Sea coastal weather pretty well, and most of those aren't even set in mortar. ;-) What I definitely would do is consider what kind of ...


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Run a strip of masking tape on the wall where the molding will cover it up, but where your nails will hit it. I hammer nails into old plaster all the time by putting a piece of masking tape on the wall and hammering into it. It holds the plaster together while the nail hits it and can easily be ripped off (gently) after I'm done hitting it. In your ...


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There is no problem with multiple 90 degree elbows. Yes there will be some friction loss due to the elbows, slightly affecting your flow rate; no it will not make any difference, your washing machine may take a few extra seconds to fill up is all. Describing the situation exactly will help you get the best answer.


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Marek's answer is what I'd expect to do. Thin In order to make the result a lot thinner than 10cm, what you can do is to use thinner support wood on the walls. Since the load is vertical you don't need substantial lumber there. I would also look into reducing the thickness of your pallet wood - you are only interested in the surface appearance and it ...


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1 king and one jack per side, assuming it's not an unusual load above. If your header has space above, make the jack continue up to the plate. Only caution is that even though the 6" fill looks good on paper, the slightest fatness in your framing materials coupled with a tiny bit of "out of plumb", might mean your door is a tight fit. Buy the dryest 2x ...


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Your question is concerning two things: 1. Proper fitting (wood planks to masonry wall). 2. Proper wood treatment (anti-moisture). So that's how will my answer look like. Let's look at this. 1. Proper fitting. I would advise preparing additional support planks going vertically with - say - 1 meter space (that spacing requires additional insight on how ...



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