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1

Yes- minor problem - When the support is beneath the shelf the load pushes down at the bottom and out at the shelf edge. When the support is above the shelf the load pulls down at the back of the shelf and out at the top Anchoring into brick is a bit tricky and much harder to achieve pull force resistance to the anchor. It can be done but I would consider ...


2

Normally the long metal arm holds all the weight. The screws are just holding the shelf in place. With the upside down shelves all the weight is on the screws/bolts. They will not be able to hold as much weight. It might be good enough. Or it might not and piles of books come crashing down on someone's head. There are calculators online to figure out ...


1

Success. I used a 2 x 10 long enough to ensure mounting to the two metal studs. I drilled the 4 half-inch holes in the wood for the toggle bolts (rated at 265 lbs each) to go through. Measure twice... For mounting the articulating bracket I drilled the 4 holes and countersunk the backside to cover the bolt heads using a 1" spade bit for that side which ...


3

Personally, I'd lean toward installing something rigid (wood/plywood/metal) that bridges between the studs and installing the TV on that, so the weight is going to the studs on both sides. Depending on your skill level and what you're placing around it, that could be a simple pair of one-bys painted to match the wall, or a nicely finished piece of plywood ...


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Short threaded connections are generally acceptable, if your piping system passes required pressure testing. As @keshlam states, check with your local permitting authority.


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If you use long enough lags to get a good bite into the stud, your first proposed method should be fine. If the "lever" action is high enough to snap a lag bolt, then it will be strong enough to snap the 2x3 as well. From a strength perspective, it doesn't matter how long the lag bolt is - the torque and shear at the junction of the wall/bracket interface ...


1

Note: I am not an engineer, and I haven't done any kind of load calculations on the recommendations below. I did some somewhat related research on how to hang a 100LB heavy bag (punching bag) from a wall (just one wall). Initially I was thinking about using pipe and a pipe floor flange, but I decided that a pipe attached to a wall was not going to be ...


0

The best solution would be to fill the 2x4 cavities with foam. This could be done either by filling each cavity from the top or by removing the siding. You have to be careful to use the correct foam (non-expanding) if you are going to fill the wall cavity without removing the siding. There are many companies that sell non-expanding foam kits and here's a ...


2

Provided you don't have knob-and-tube wiring, this one is easy. Remove the vinyl siding, cut holes through the EPS foam and the sheathing at the top of each stud bay, and inject dense-packed cellulose into the empty stud bays. Should be pretty cheap and help a ton. I wouldn't use retrofit-style non-expanding foam. It'll be more expensive, highly flammable, ...


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If you're going to rip off the siding, then insulate from the outside. If it were my house, I would remove the clapboard and sheathing, then spray in expanding foam. Follow the recommendation of the foam insulation manufacturer for how to finish the outside before you install your vinyl siding. Another good alternative is to blow in loose insulation. Since ...


1

I would pat the ceiling with fire hot wet sponges (have used paint rollers too) and then scrape off as much as you can. Then you skim the ceiling. I have both used @BrianK's method of rolling and have just used a long putty knife. They both have their good/bad points. Rolling a ceiling is an absolute mess so you would have to tarp everything. For a ...


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I have heard of an old Wall-paper installers trick, but have never done it myself. You take some joint compound and thin it down so that it can be put on with a smooth roller. You then roll it onto the wall. After three or so coats (let dry between coats), viola - the wall is smooth. Like I said, I have never tried it myself. But maybe someone else here ...


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Think about 1/4 inch drywall. It can be glued or screwed up and is much easier, faster and neater than trying to take the existing finish down to smooth. You do need to deal with seams and edges at the baseboard, but it is still faster an easier. Links are for illustration only and not an endorsement of products or sources.


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Have you looked at 3M command adhesive strips? They hold very well but are easily removable later on.


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Frankly, replacing one horizontal run like that probably isn't worth the effort, unless there will be lots of rain in the future. It may well be sufficient to strip, putty the gaps, caulk the edges, and paint. Otherwise, you'll have to replace the siding panel. Remove the bench and wall. Remove the siding, and renew. The tools and materials are ...


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I think I would jack the wall up a tiny bit (1/16 inch), enough to slide out the particle board and slide in plywood. Given the difficulties of jacks being in the way of the work, cut the plywood so it is only 12-16 inches wide (and 8 feet long or whatever) so the jacking support can be away from the wall.



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