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1

I wouldn't recommend bonding sill plates directly to a concrete floor. Any wood in direct contact with basement concrete is asking for trouble. Concrete is porous and will wick moisture to anything placed on top of it. In order to prevent moisture wicking into the sill plate and consequent danger of mould, mildew, and rot, it's better to lay a 12" wide sheet ...


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I wouldn't fasten any wood (even pressure-treated) to undergrade concrete without a vapour barrier in between the two. Concrete is porous, and will without doubt enable moisture to wick into the wood, leading to rot or mould. It's not difficult to run a 12"-wide strip of polyethylene plastic under the wood, which will extend the life of any wood on concrete, ...


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I'd trust construction adhesive without any mechanical fasteners if you fit your new wall framing snugly. The friction provided by well-fit studs along with the glue will result in a bond that won't likely ever move. Exceptions would be if you intend to ever mount very heavy items on the wall, or if you have heavy solid-core doors in that location. All ...


1

I have found liquid nails on a few jobs in the past that did appear to work but is not code in my area. The 2x4 placed flat on the wall only needs an inch and a half to be code. The minimum wall thickness for a single story here is 6" and 8-12" on taller structures. Most modern basements were poured with forms that have straps or snap pins holding the forms ...


2

If the radius of the wall to ceiling transition is on the order of 1 to 2 inches then that corner is likely formed by use of a vinyl inside corner beading. It comes in lengths and inserted up into the corners and nailed / screwed along the edges through a flange that gets covered over with a feathered edge of drywall mud to blend the beading to the wall and ...


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As requested: That far away I cant see any problem. Your soil had to be stable enough to put the basement in. I would not even worry about a monolith that far away.


3

I would definitely assume the wall is supporting that beam. Get a structural engineer's advice to be sure, and to find out what your options might be. Solutions often exist, but may not be DIYable... and this is emphatically not something you want to risk getting wrong. For comparison: My contractor was able to open a 15-foot-wide passageway through a ...


2

As Joe points out, if this wall is original, then it's not drywall, but plaster. You can't easily detect studs behind plaster walls with a stud detector. You likely have to use test holes. One option is to drill a largish hole in the center(ish) of where you will mount the TV. Then use a coat hanger to fish it into the hole to see if you can locate the studs ...


2

An over-100-year-old apartment building is likely plaster-over-lath. In that case, you should be able to drill through the plaster and into the lath to sink wood screws. If this is so, you'll see what looks like sawdust on the tip of the drill when you pull it out. I'd probably use a bunch more than just the 4 recommended, but it'll hold a TV under 50 lbs....


1

Assuming the bricks would be adequately supported from below, you would use brick ties (attached to wall studs on one end, and embedded in mortar on the other) to give your brick wall vertical stability. If you want the look of brick wall with less effort, you can just install brick-look tiles on a suitable backer board onto your existing wall.


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First of all, yes the condition is dangerous. You have compromised the integrity of a part designed to protect you from smoke and toxic gasses that are released by combustion. Released into a relatively confined spaces these bad gasses can accumulate and pose health hazards. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are your primary concerns here. But you haven'...


3

You can drill small holes through a typical masonry wall without compromising its load-bearing. Assuming the holes are no more than a few inches in diameter, well spaced apart and are few in number, there should be no problem. If in doubt, ask an engineer.


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I can't find them offered online either. The quality/style has changed quite a bit since those were made, and I think they've been outmoded. I found something similar: http://www.uticacast.com/Veneer.htm


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Some ideas: Buy an easel and set it on that. Build an easel-like frame and set it on that.


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I have had a lot of success with those "Command" adhesives from 3M, but it entirely depends on how heavy it is. If you are not familiar with them they have a tab that allows them to break their glue bond by stretching the material and I have not had any leave marks on the wall. They are available at about any hardware store. They have a weight rating on ...


3

It looks like this one which has a manual, which says: Remove the push button cover by gently prying off the top edge with a screwdriver



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