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Yes you can. First make sure you have a rough surface. Then apply several coats of stain killer. Make sure it's alcohol base. This means it has shellac in it which is an excellent sealer. I prefer zinzer it's not as sloppy as kilz. Then get some easysand drywall patch, mix it up and apply with wide knife. This is one way. I'm sure you will hear more.


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End nailing into the brace will not be a useful and strong joint. Instead do something like the following where the brace is made of 2x lumber. Notch it as shown and set on edge and toe nailed from each side. Much stronger.


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No use in my experience, but maybe you could post some pics of the wall in question? I've found that actual rising damp is quite often misdiagnosed. More often it's the gradual rising of the outside ground level, poorly managed rainwater and surface water or even internal living conditions to name a few. Sometimes the walls joints are cracked or eroded and ...


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No concrete hard enough with a standard Hammer Drill with a masonry bit. Just drill a hole, then use one of those cheap plastic wall anchors. With the plastic anchor in place, you now have a screw-friendly hole. Unfortunately, this is the only reliable solution.


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That's an extremely long span for 2x8s, even tripled. Do you know whether there was ever an intermediate post? Most would suggest that you have a engineer look over your situation. Existing framing isn't always a good indicator of what to use. At any rate, a pair of 1-3/4" microlam (or laminated veneer lumber--LVL) beams will almost certainly suffice. The ...


1

This is a simple repair that should only take a bit of time. The repair shouldn't be rushed so that the result is a patch that is hard to detect. Here is what you should do: CAUTION must be used when working near electric wires and devices. It would be wise to shut off the breaker at the panel before attempting this repair! Remove loose plaster sections ...


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Menards and other places rent core drills for large holes in concrete. Easiest way is to call Diamond Drilling or a similar company and have them come out and drill all your holes for a few hundred dollars. Unless you want to buy a Hilti DD100 and the bits which will cost you way more than hundreds.


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If you're using a hammer drill, try using a regular drill (or turn hammer mode off) and the masonry bit. Spin fast, push slow. Oversize the holes and use plastic plug anchors to provide some cushion. Once you do get a few solid connections, use some construction adhesive or silicone on your batten for additional support.


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In the UK, switches with fuses are normally used for high-power and/or permanently wired appliances such as heating systems, electric-showers, ovens and so on. It is possible your consumer unit (AKA distribution board or fusebox) has a circuit labelled for that outlet. I would check that and try to match up every circuit. A normal small UK home might have ...


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Not really fixable. The way masonry works is that it goes up from a foundation. If the foundation is unsound the masonry will crack. Doesn't matter how big the rocks are. The Great Pyramid will crack if something happens to its basement. You cannot repair a crack in masonry by putting gunk into it, you can only hide a crack. Naturally, there are many ...


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Setting-type joint compounds don't tend to feather out as well as water-based compounds, especially if they're not mixed extremely carefully. They're likely to leave a ragged edge requiring much more sanding than should be necessary. Also, per the spec sheet for the product: Do not use setting-type joint compounds for thin skim coats. If setting-type ...


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The easy sand is a "light-weight" compound which is why it sands so easily. If you ever sanded this type of compound you'd see why it shouldn't be applied in thin layers. It sands off very easily. If it is applied as a skim coat it wouldn't last 1 or 2 passes with your sander. You will see this frequently on all types of wall patching products. If it has ...


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The link that BMitch left in the comments is a good guideline. The top 2 answers cover a lot of stuff to check. All in all the best way to check, since the ceiling will need repair anyway, is to remove enough drywall to see the top plate, which is still not a sure thing even if it is a double top plate. I have seen many homes built where non bearing walls ...


1

If your description is accurate, it doesn't sound like a load bearing wall. A bearing wall would not transfer load through plywood, it would always transfer through structural members. However, you haven't shown any photos, diagrams, or blueprints. Because of that, there's no way for us to guarantee that it's not bearing. Remove the wall at your own risk.


3

It looks like one layer of paper has separated from the other. The paper surrounding the tearout has loose flaps of paper around it too. Remove all loose paper and give a tight skim coat or two of paste spackle, sand smooth, prime and paint. You will be wise to get a 4" drywall knife to help in this. The little 1" knife that is considered a putty knife ...


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I misinterpreted the photos. On my small monitor set for night mode, it looked like a couple holes all the way through the sheetrock. This answer explains how to patch holes in the sheetrock: Which do you want? Good Cut a rectangular section out of the wall which includes both holes. It is easier if both the left side and the right side of the hole ...


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Some of this is a repeat of Tyler's post, but I just wanted to start from scratch and explain my take on it... The spacing of the supports for the bar will most likely fall in places where there is no framing. It would be a rare coincidence if it does. If you are going to use this as a pull up bar for exercise, you will need to install a large enough ...


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For form leftovers like this we usually hit them with the angle grinder and then go back and forth with pliers until it snaps at wall. I wouldn't just directly hammer these as you might be surprised at how big of a chunk of wall you take out with it.


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They look like the form clips where large forms were held in place to pour the walls. They can be handy as anchors if you add furring strips to drywall the walls instead of drilling for supports. They were just there for the pour and can be removed.


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They're left over from the forming system the contractor used. You may remove them by striking them sideways with a hammer or repeatedly bending them with any other tool. They're hardened steel and will snap off.


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Wooden wall? Pretty rare that walls are made of wood. Are you talking about the molding around the doorway? The following diagram shows a typical way that a door might be framed: Every door is a little different, so you need to determine how your door is framed. Your goal is to get the provided lag bolts to go at least 3.5 cm into solid wood. (I would ...


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You may want to consider a third repair on how to repair block walls. It involves drilling an opening through the wall at a pre-determined angle and sinking a large all-thread rod with an expanding head (like a toggle bolt) into the soil. The expanded end anchors the rod making it rigid and un-moveable. The other end projects from the basement wall. It now ...


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Sure, as long as the material around the holes is sound and the holes are the correct size for the fasteners or anchors.



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