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The concrete should be etched and a paint specifically made for exterior concrete used. Sherwin-Williams has specially acrylics for concrete and etching solutions as do other leading manufacturers. Either of those cleaners containing phosphorus, will clean and remove oils. Etching opens pores in the concrete providing something to bond to and removes the ...


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Not critical at all. There are best practices. Like making sure corners have stud surface on both sides, making all studs 16 on center, make all studs plumb. Does it matter? No. Do inspectors care? No. Now I wouldn't suggest making your studs further than 16 inches but back in the day they were generally 24 for basements. I have seen people do them ...


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An inch out is not that big of a deal, though an inspector might not want to see it. If you can Add a stud, Can you not just fix it so it is straight? I will use construction screws with pre-drilled holed when I have a tricky placement that needs a bit of finessing. Attaching a second stud to it would also make that one out of plumb, but would suffice the ...


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There are several stuffs you can do to your exterior painting job, as well as help keep the paint look new for longer. See these top 10 ways you can do your paintwork and protect it over time. Ensure That Exterior Surfaces Are Fully Inspected Before Painting. Check The Exterior Walls And Surfaces For Signs Of Weather Damage. Prep The Surface Walls Before ...


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I had a very similar problem happen to me. Someone had left a gap between the drywall on the ceiling and the drywall on the wall. I bought the Spackle that has latex in it. I filled the crack, do not over do it because that stuff is very difficult to sand. Another part of the problem was they did not put any seem tape on the seems. After I got the crack ...


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I live in Canada in a cold climate,I was always told that if you're going to install vapor barrier in your walls,it is best to install it on the inside portion of the walls and allow the outside cavity to breathe as you have to allow moisture and condensation to disperse from the walls.I am currently renovating my home after having major mold mildew and ...


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Fill a spray bottle with one part bleach, 9 parts water. Wear gloves and then spray the walls with the solution, let sit for a minute and then wipe with the sponge.


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If the roof is structured with pre-built trusses, then this site, http://inspectapedia.com/interiors/Roof_Truss_Uplift.php could explain the condition you observe. Briefly, if different parts of a wooden truss are subject to different temperature or humidity, the changes in individual dimensions can cause the truss to arch in the middle, and draw away from ...


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What generally works for me - when just pulling them out with my hands doesn't - is to insert a screw, rotate it a few times so it gets some grip on the anchor and then pull both of them out. A screwdriver will work, too, I think, though, you'll want to apply some pressure to one side and either pull or pop it out that way. If they're really stuck.. then I ...


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If the wall is standard drywall, I would use a punch, wooden dowel or something similar and push them in. By design they are resistant to pulling out with out some wall damage. They just need to be slightly below the surface. Repairing the holes will depend on the wall finish. If it is painted then spackle as @Craig suggested, and repaint. If it has ...


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Buy a bucket of sheet rock mud, a roll of tape, and a taping spatula. Fill the cracks with mud after temperatures warm up a bit, and roll the tape over the mud. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhMqYJNUgkU Once it's really dry, like wait a week until it's chalky white, then lightly sand with a taping sponge, then you'll have to repaint it. If you don't have ...


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From the picture it seems that the walls were done and the ceiling last and trying to meet the walls. Normally (if done right) the drywall on the ceiling would rest on the drywall from your walls. In this case even if you had a lot of contraction throughout the year you would have a very minor crack at most (which could be fixed with plaster or even ...


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The reason why this is happening is the structural members are expanding and contracting with the temperature/humidity changes. There is no good solution to fix the issues, but you can cover it up. The quick and dirty solution would be to put up quarter round over the seams, and attach it to the studs only- That is not to the ceiling. This would allow for ...


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Check out some of the hollow baseboard products-- I don't know if Plugmold makes one or not-- but it has duplex outlets along its length. I've seen pictures of 'standard' plugmold with the outlets every foot or so 'built in' to a standard baseboard-- a flat board the same depth as the plugmold, the plug mold on top, with decorative molding at the floor and ...


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The adjustment is usually under on the wall part of the bracket. The bracket needs to be plumb in both planes (kind of left and right and then forward and backward). The better brackets are bolted back to the wall and then micro adjusted (via small adjustment grub screws) in all planes until absolutely spot on. Then assuming no play in the arm, all should ...


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There may be an adjustment screw to counter the gravity on the articulated arm. The silver screw in the picture closest to the back of the TV comes to mind as being an adjustment, but then again, you may need to slip the covers off the bracket on the wall, loosen them up a turn, tilt the bracket the other way and tighten the screws back up. The down side to ...


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Although it is technically possible, doing so will be a waste of time and money. The radiant barrier itself is only effective if it is facing open space; if one side is touching the wall and the other is covered in fabric, then there is no benefit. The bubble wrap itself has an insulation value of maybe R-1, so it will offer very little insulation for the ...


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Do NOT touch the 3 hot wires together. From what I have heard, unlike the US, Germany provides full 3 phase power to residences. That means those three hot wires are each 120 degrees out of phase with each other, so touching them will create a short circuit. If you use a multimeter to measure the voltage from one to the other, you should see somewhere ...


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What country and what type of service do you have? Colors can mean different things in different regions, and the electrician may or may not have follow standard color schemes. But regardless, you should be able to figure out what the wires do by tracing them back to the source. You are correct - only 3 wires are needed for a basic wall outlet (hot, neutral, ...


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If you're Europe, those are the standard colours for 3 phase wiring. It may be the electrician had some spare and used that instead. I'd suggest testing the black and grey wires aren't live (and insulate them off), and continue to use the brown as live, blue as neutral and green/yellow as earth.


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The right way to do this is to deconstruct the side and top of the stairway wall - remove the drywall, the stair railing, and the top plate for that wall, and then add additional studs. Your two choices are balloon framing that runs all the way to the ceiling and platform framing that is two separate walls stacked on top of each other. For platform ...


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It's a coat hook - it doesn't hold that much weight, and all the force is shear force, not pulling force. So pretty much anything will work. Simple plastic anchors with screws will work just fine. (Never heard of rawl plugs but google says that that's the same thing as a plastic anchor.) Masonry screws are a real pain to use if you are not a pro. I would ...


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You'll need a masonry bit and hammer drill to get a hole in brick. However it may be easier to screw the hooks to a piece of wood and mount the wood to the wall. With a nice routed edge on the wood that can look really nice. To mount the wood you can use normal masonry anchors.


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If these are only for coats I would glue them up with construction adhesive or silicone.


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First we don't really know if this wall is load bearing or not. If the house was built in the US 50 years ago and it is a basement with poured concrete then the chances of having a wooden fabricated load bearing wall are slim - it happens but not very likely. Second all you have to do to answer your question - if it is a load bearing wall - is look above ...


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If trimming a small amount 1/8" - 1/4" off a stud in a load bearing wall is the ONLY option, then I would do that PLUS install another stud directly beside the cut one, and fasten them together -- this is called "sistering". Good luck! :)


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It depends how wide the studs themselves are. Is it a pre-built cabinet? A better approach, if feasible would be to adapt the cabinet itself. Trying to trim wall studs is tricky unless you're making only the smallest of cuts.



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