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11

The reason why this is happening is the structural members are expanding and contracting with the temperature/humidity changes. There is no good solution to fix the issues, but you can cover it up. The quick and dirty solution would be to put up quarter round over the seams, and attach it to the studs only- That is not to the ceiling. This would allow for ...


4

If the wall is standard drywall, I would use a punch, wooden dowel or something similar and push them in. By design they are resistant to pulling out with out some wall damage. They just need to be slightly below the surface. Repairing the holes will depend on the wall finish. If it is painted then spackle as @Craig suggested, and repaint. If it has ...


4

From the picture it seems that the walls were done and the ceiling last and trying to meet the walls. Normally (if done right) the drywall on the ceiling would rest on the drywall from your walls. In this case even if you had a lot of contraction throughout the year you would have a very minor crack at most (which could be fixed with plaster or even ...


4

You'll need a masonry bit and hammer drill to get a hole in brick. However it may be easier to screw the hooks to a piece of wood and mount the wood to the wall. With a nice routed edge on the wood that can look really nice. To mount the wood you can use normal masonry anchors.


3

If trimming a small amount 1/8" - 1/4" off a stud in a load bearing wall is the ONLY option, then I would do that PLUS install another stud directly beside the cut one, and fasten them together -- this is called "sistering". Good luck! :)


2

What generally works for me - when just pulling them out with my hands doesn't - is to insert a screw, rotate it a few times so it gets some grip on the anchor and then pull both of them out. A screwdriver will work, too, I think, though, you'll want to apply some pressure to one side and either pull or pop it out that way. If they're really stuck.. then I ...


2

If these are only for coats I would glue them up with construction adhesive or silicone.


2

The adjustment is usually under on the wall part of the bracket. The bracket needs to be plumb in both planes (kind of left and right and then forward and backward). The better brackets are bolted back to the wall and then micro adjusted (via small adjustment grub screws) in all planes until absolutely spot on. Then assuming no play in the arm, all should ...


1

There may be an adjustment screw to counter the gravity on the articulated arm. The silver screw in the picture closest to the back of the TV comes to mind as being an adjustment, but then again, you may need to slip the covers off the bracket on the wall, loosen them up a turn, tilt the bracket the other way and tighten the screws back up. The down side to ...


1

Although it is technically possible, doing so will be a waste of time and money. The radiant barrier itself is only effective if it is facing open space; if one side is touching the wall and the other is covered in fabric, then there is no benefit. The bubble wrap itself has an insulation value of maybe R-1, so it will offer very little insulation for the ...


1

Do NOT touch the 3 hot wires together. From what I have heard, unlike the US, Germany provides full 3 phase power to residences. That means those three hot wires are each 120 degrees out of phase with each other, so touching them will create a short circuit. If you use a multimeter to measure the voltage from one to the other, you should see somewhere ...


1

It's a coat hook - it doesn't hold that much weight, and all the force is shear force, not pulling force. So pretty much anything will work. Simple plastic anchors with screws will work just fine. (Never heard of rawl plugs but google says that that's the same thing as a plastic anchor.) Masonry screws are a real pain to use if you are not a pro. I would ...


1

These work nice. I use them often. http://www.mycablemart.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=850 You can use them with these: http://www.mycablemart.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&relate=1&p=885


1

I've done this on one room- taking a knock-down texture and skim coating it to make it smooth. The downside is that you then are able to see every wave, bump, and bobble that the drywall installers didn't bother fixing because they knew it would be hidden by texture. ;) I was able to get by with one coat and one sanding, but I was also applying a ...


1

Check out some of the hollow baseboard products-- I don't know if Plugmold makes one or not-- but it has duplex outlets along its length. I've seen pictures of 'standard' plugmold with the outlets every foot or so 'built in' to a standard baseboard-- a flat board the same depth as the plugmold, the plug mold on top, with decorative molding at the floor and ...



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