Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

You could use a fine surface filler to fill the small imperfections and sand that smooth. Alternatively, if the old paint is loose enough to pull off on the roller, you should probably scrape it off before painting anyway. Finally, if there is too much surface imperfection, you could paper the wall with lining paper and paint over that.


5

Sure there are other ways, you could spend tens of thousands of dollars to have it x-rayed (they do this in commercial buildings), but realistically, drilling a small hole and using an inspection camera is the simplest and cheapest route. You might also try contacting your cities building department to see if they have any plans on-file - this might show ...


4

Yes it is normal and no, you don't need to seal it. There's always a space between the floor and wall, but in finished parts of your house, there is baseboard that will cover it. If you want to spend money on baseboard behind your stove, go for it, but it serves no purpose other than aesthetics.


4

The easiest is to get an extension cord for the low voltage cable on the AC adapter. Most likely the adapter comes equipped with a 2.1mm or 2.5mm center pin barrel type power plug. Extension cords for these are readily available. One would look like this: The extension cable would allow you to power the router from within the same room from an electrical ...


4

If you wish to preserve the brick exterior, you have the following options, depending on the wall construction: If you have a structural brick wall (e.g. multiple-wythe brick or brick veneer on block) then you will have to insulate the wall from the inside. This will entail applying rigid insulation board--either foam or mineral wool--over the inside of ...


4

Using a coat of white pigmented shellac will harden and seal the distressed paper that is flagging. Once dry, the surface will be able to be sanded lightly, to remove fuzz. This product is sold as a primer and is a good water-based stain blocker. Deeper imperfections will then need to be filled and sanded. The non-latex, non water base fillers will not ...


3

I would avoid sanding the wall because it is likely that the paint has lead in it, and sanding will put fine particles of it in the air which can make you and your family sick. Before you go any further, I recommend strongly that you purchase a lead paint testing kit to determine if there is any lead paint to deal with. These kits are inexpensive and are ...


3

If you are installing a tile backsplash, just sort the issue out on the tile substrate. Depending where you want the tile surface, either overlay backerboard and shim to correct the gaps, or rip out the current wall surface and replace with backerboard, shimmed to correct the gap once the tile is installed (which may mean an even gap before the tile is ...


2

If the pictures that you want to hang are relatively light weight and the wall at the hanging site is hollow (i.e. free of a stud obstruction) then you may want to consider one of the newer style wire hanger hooks. These are very easy to install simply by poking the long sharp end straight into the wall. You push it in to the bend just behind the hook. ...


2

How about a good old fashioned nail and a picture hanger? Don't think I've ever had one of those fall down.


2

Ideally when you set a stand-alone cabinet you have a scribe on both of the ends that contact the wall like so (dimensions are exaggerated for clarity): Not often are you going to find integral scribes on a store bought vanity but you can add your own after the fact and that gives you the chances to set the piece to the median square of the corner and ...


2

You could analyze pipes and wiring, looking for things unaccounted for in the rest of the house. But the only way to know for sure is if you open a hole and have a look. If the lower floor is "half-underground" it would be fairly unusual to have no room there if the ground is level and "halfway" all around. If the "mystery room" side is uphill and fully or ...


2

Depending on where you are located this is probably not legal. In the USA in most building jurisdictions every bedroom has to have an exterior escape (ie. a window that meets the size requirements for a human to escape through). Also, USA NEC electrical code requires receptacles to be placed so that no point along the floor/wall line is more than 6 feet ...


1

Unless your existing room already happens to have two doors then the project that you propose is never going to get any where because the project is more than trying to build some divider wall. Trying to cut an additional doorway into the room is just not something you can freely do to a property that you happen to be renting. Additionally the ...


1

Simply exchanging the air between the rooms will equalize the temperatures because the air will mix. I would just cut two vents in the wall, one high and one low. Natural airflow probably won't be enough to balance the temperature, so put a fan in one or both of the vents. If you do both, point the fans in opposite directions. Again, it doesn't really ...


1

I am not aware of any professional products for this, but you could get an arduino or rasberry pi device with two temperature sensors, and hook it up to a bi-directional fan and write some code to have it automatically start at a certain temperature difference.


1

Here's a dead-simple idea: use a PTAC unit to air condition the room with excess heat, and dump it into the adjacent room. That's the general idea behind how companies with huge server rooms recycle heat during wintertime. Their systems are much more sophisticated, of course, inevitably involving heat exchangers, water cooling, thermostats, multiple zones ...


1

A bathroom should have water resistant materials in the places likely to be splashed with water. Stanard drywall is not used in those locations, but rather hardboard or cement board should have been used. If the proper materials were used in the first place, then you can just prime and paint over them. What @Ecnerwal is saying in his comment applies more ...


1

As Steven mentioned, it's normal. That's a gap to prevent water on the floor or in your slab or foundation walls wicking up into the (moisture-sensitive) paper-faced drywall. There's only one reason you'd want to seal it up: if it's a path for air infiltration or exfiltration through the wall. If you discover that this is the case, you can seal it with a ...


1

Your two options are going to be insulation batting or spray foam. Batting is cheap, easy enough to do as a DIYer and will easily come in under your price tag. The other spray foam is more expensive and typically requires professional install. There is a DIYer kit out there but I have never used them. Professional install you are looking at way over ...


1

Petty much going to need a hammer drill for brick. You could try going into the mortar, but it sounds like you already dulled your bit. Try a fresh bit going into the mortar joint but don't expect superior pull-out strength.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible