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22

Cut some short strips of plywood or even paneling (long enough to overlap both sides of the hole by a couple of inches). Don't cut your fingers off. Put the plywood strip(s) in the hole and position the strip so it is extending out beyond both edges of the hole, behind the sheetrock. Hold the strip tightly by pulling outward on the back of strip with your ...


6

Buy a 5" holesaw (and a drill sturdy enough to drive it). Cut a 5" hole in a big chunk of plywood. Screw/nail/clamp the plywood in the place where you want the hole. Drill away. If you're having a hard time with the drill binding and trying to twist your wrist off, run it in reverse. It's much slower, but you won't have the same problem. Couple more tips: ...


3

Remove an outlet or switch plate and look at what the edges of the wall are. It should be immediately obvious if they're wood paneling or something. Otherwise, it'll be plaster or drywall. Drywall will have straight edges and a chalky core, while plaster is more organic-looking and flowing, and will have wooden supports behind it. Regardless, it's actually ...


3

The outside corners of your walls have metal "drywall corner bead". (There's also paper and plastic.) Sometimes, though rare, there's metal bead in the inside corners. The corner bead itself is relatively thin, but if you're trying to get through it, either with a drill bit or a screw, you'll need to push reasonably forcefully. If you don't, the bead can ...


3

Luckily your mount has slots for the bolts so you have a bit of room to work. Get another (stronger, higher quality) lag bolt and put it in right beside the broken one. Leave a tiny bit of room between them if you can, but make sure it still solidly hits the stud. Predrill the hole. To find the right size, hold the bolt up behind your drill bit. The ...


3

I guess it's too late to consider 5-1/4" trim? Hit the line of old caulk with a long blade utility knife (like an Olfa), a sharp chisel or a wallpaper scraper. Then sand lightly to knock down any other lumps and apply a coat or two of mud. (Premixed if you have time; 20 or 90 minute setting compound if you're in a hurry.) When dry, sand lightly.


2

If the hole is fairly small (say <4" diameter), then you can likely get away with just covering the hole with fiber mesh tape and using a hard setting compound (e.g. Sheetrock 90) to fill the hole. For larger holes Craig has the "best" method, but I've used this method successfully for holes in plaster and drywall up to 3.5" diameter.


2

Drywall patches are available at most home improvement stores. I've personally never used one, so I can't say how well they work (if at all). Though for the couple of dollars they cost, it might be worth a try. There are self adhesive patches like this one available at most home improvement stores. Wal-Board Tools 4" x 4" Drywall Repair Patch Again, ...


2

You could drill out larger holes, then fill with epoxy, then mount the hinges through the epoxy. But that seems like a lot of work. I'd instead install a post alongside the wall and use the post.


2

Either it is a load bearing pole or someone who built the post was just practicing their pole making skills. You can remove it when you offset the load to another part of your house. Usually this would involve putting up an overhead beam and 1-2 poles to hold that. This is very specific to your house and taking out a concrete pole will definitely involve ...


1

If you can't get a center pilot drill to guide the cut, you can guide it by the outside edge: Get the 5" holesaw. Use it to cut a hole out of a board or piece of plywood (or several pieces of plywood stacked and screwed-and-glued together). Center this 5" hole over the 4" hole, and temporarily anchor it firmly in place somehow (a few nails or screws, ...


1

Ask your project's engineer or general contractor.


1

When you are dealing with weak materials, the goal is to spread the load among several attachment points and across a wide area. You should consider gate hinges, preferably those with a long tongue, such as these The long section would go on your sandstone surface using the deepest anchors you can use. Consider expansion anchors and bolts rather than ...


1

Ready for muddy water? If you go by solely by code, 2012 IRC Table R302.1(1) specs out a 1 hour TESTED wall assembly with fire from both sides. As an individual component, IBC Specs out a 40 min rating per layer of 5/8" Type X so to have a 1 hour untested assembly you would need two layers EACH SIDE. The only way to get the 1 hour rating is to use a ...


1

You mean other than burning your house down? Yes, rocks that have water in them like to explode sometimes when you heat them. Use a fan and come back next week (seriously, if the wall is saturated it could take months to dry out). Also, it's going to leave scorch marks, which will be less than helpful. More also's: one of the by-products of combustion is ...


1

OK, I've had remodelers tell my wife that those walls are not load bearing (they didn't go into the attic). Meanwhile, I've had a friend from church with framing experience look closely in the attic and say I definitely need to transfer the load being carried by these boards and walls and have at least one board to keep the roof from racking away from the ...


1

Use the longest screw you can without excessively damaging the wall. It's far better to have a more stable installation than chancing the television from falling. Looking at it another way, if you use screws that are too small and are forced to redo the job, you're going to have more damage from the original installation than you would have if you had just ...



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