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5

Get a reputable professional structural engineer in there ASAP -- it looks like the wall is severely cracked and would fail at that point when subject to shear loads. I'm sure that the eyeballs of said engineer will tell a story when he sees a wall that's cracked that badly. Also, WHO THE HELL BUILDS WALLS ATOP LOOSE EARTH?


3

When the use of a proper foundation is avoided, the earth under the house WILL settle. It will settle unevenly, causing structural damage. The solution is to do extensive construction to build a support system for the weight of the house. Building without foundation is illegal by the International Builders Code. SECTION R403 FOOTINGS R403.1 General. All ...


2

I have overseen the install of, and eventually tuned up a set of sliders that were 5 sections of glass panels 8 ft each. 2 of the panels, one at each end, were stationary, the other 3 were operable. Each panel weighed about 500 lbs each with 1 3/4" thick insulated glass panels. The wood frame was about 3" thick. The hardware was lift-slide hardware The link ...


2

I would not even mess with that. Trying to apply some substance to the brick will be a very tricky operation. The best option is probably to build a drywall box closely around it. Doing that guarantees that everything will be flat and easy. Two notes: (1) Make sure the boundary areas at the top and bottom are absolutely sealed off, not even a pencil ...


2

Point 1 Usually paneling is put up over cracked plaster as a expedient fix. Lookup skimcoating plaster as a fix for bad plaster. It works well on walls. Anchoring is needed for ceilings if the plaster is broken off the lath. Point 2 Overlaying drywall is a definite fix. 3/8 thick panels is frequently used for this. Some problems can be: the need for ...


1

Option 3 is the sanest IMHO. You can get a bucket of drywall mud for $15 and do a "skim coat" over the panels to create a flat surface. No need to sand first; this stuff will stick to anything! Once the mud is dry, you can sand it to get a smooth look, or texture it. Texturing can be done with cans of spray-on texture you get at big box stores, or using a ...


1

Primer will cure a lot, and this is one of them. I'm assuming you will be using painters, they will know how prep the walls so you will never see where it was graffiti-ed.


1

I agree with Tyler Durdens advice,with one important addition. Don't lay your patio directly on gravel. Assuming your patio is about 75-100mm deep, gravel on its own will not offer enough support, and eventually, cracks will appear due to subsidence. A much better solution would be to "layer" your foundation in order of aggregate size. Lay a layer (or two) ...


1

NO! You cannot, for any reason, connect a grounding conductor to a neutral (grounded) conductor anywhere other than in the service equipment. If you do so, the metal box and any metal connected to the box (including the fan housing) will become a current carrying conductor. This is very bad, and can result in personal injury and/or death. I doubt the ...


1

The term you are looking for is lag bolts. Those are what came with my tv wall mount (50in) and 4 of them held it tightly for 5 years and pulled the paint off the wall when I took it down. Drill your holes slightly smaller than the threading on the bolt so the threads dig into the studs as they go in.


1

My guess about these planks are that a builder made outer walls (that are carrying the loads) first, as well as interior support walls (if any present) and then laid a wooden floor. Just then, he(she?) managed to place internal walls that were not for supportive matters (dividing into rooms) on this floor. Years passed, loads made under-wall-planks to go ...


1

Those are not cracks. It is where the concrete was poured and had a chance to set for a while, perhaps while another part of the foundation was being poured. The concrete chute or hose then returned to the area in question, and resumed pouring, allowing the coarser aggregate to show at the joint. It may also be a cold joint, where concrete was started, ...


1

Having a picture would be good. If ivy is growing there, it means it is getting water somehow, which is bad. Just cutting the visible part will not fix the critical problem, which is the water supply. When ivy grows it creates a thick mat of small roots and veins that make sort of a carpet in the floor of the area. This mat has to receive water for the ivy ...



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