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3

I would definitely assume the wall is supporting that beam. Get a structural engineer's advice to be sure, and to find out what your options might be. Solutions often exist, but may not be DIYable... and this is emphatically not something you want to risk getting wrong. For comparison: My contractor was able to open a 15-foot-wide passageway through a ...


3

You can drill small holes through a typical masonry wall without compromising its load-bearing. Assuming the holes are no more than a few inches in diameter, well spaced apart and are few in number, there should be no problem. If in doubt, ask an engineer.


3

It looks like this one which has a manual, which says: Remove the push button cover by gently prying off the top edge with a screwdriver


2

Assuming not much is as stake, the idea is reasonable if the rack will still 'work' when it is 1.5" from the wall. I suggest screws or lags of whatever type you have on hand, long enough to drive 1.5" into the stud, placed 3/4" from the top of the 2x4 cleat, one per stud, assuming you can tighten the screws enough to fasten the cleat tightly to the wall. ...


2

As Joe points out, if this wall is original, then it's not drywall, but plaster. You can't easily detect studs behind plaster walls with a stud detector. You likely have to use test holes. One option is to drill a largish hole in the center(ish) of where you will mount the TV. Then use a coat hanger to fish it into the hole to see if you can locate the studs ...


2

An over-100-year-old apartment building is likely plaster-over-lath. In that case, you should be able to drill through the plaster and into the lath to sink wood screws. If this is so, you'll see what looks like sawdust on the tip of the drill when you pull it out. I'd probably use a bunch more than just the 4 recommended, but it'll hold a TV under 50 lbs....


1

Assuming the bricks would be adequately supported from below, you would use brick ties (attached to wall studs on one end, and embedded in mortar on the other) to give your brick wall vertical stability. If you want the look of brick wall with less effort, you can just install brick-look tiles on a suitable backer board onto your existing wall.


1

First of all, yes the condition is dangerous. You have compromised the integrity of a part designed to protect you from smoke and toxic gasses that are released by combustion. Released into a relatively confined spaces these bad gasses can accumulate and pose health hazards. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are your primary concerns here. But you haven'...


1

this works fine http://www.rona.ca/en/paint---silicone-remover you may have to find a supplier of it or something like it near you. it takes a lot of time and patience on brick, and you will have to reapply it many times to get it all off, but if you are patient, it removes all traces of silicones.


1

Drew is correct. You can remove the bent nails to have your new wall ensure it won't go anywhere. However, you can drill a few small holes, like every 4', out by the outer edge of the flange to pop in some screws or nails...nothing major is needed at all. You just don't want to do anything to the inner "I" that may compromise the engineering. That's actually ...



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