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I would avoid any interference with a load-bearing beam (which you do well to point out). Drilling holes -or space for a receptacle- will surely make it more fragile. Instead of that, the option of switching the switches from one side of the wall to the opposite side may be attractive. Basically, you would need to disconnect and take out the switches from ...


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I'm no expert, but AFAIK, the frame of a shear wall is (by definition) clad with plywood, OSB, or somesuch, not just with sheetrock. From the looks of the chunks of sheetrock on the floor and remaining on the frame (top center), only sheetrock appears to have been removed on “this” side (exposing the framing we can see). The other side, which we can only see ...


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In my opinion this should be done 3 times per span at a minimum. So really it depends what you are building with. If you use your stock 2x4s that are 8 feet then 3. But If you get longer 2x4s I think you can also go with 3, given there are no breaks. (This is also assuming that you can fasten the bottom every couple feet)


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Honestly, I would imagine your walls will be just fine with a little water running over them. The stone walls all over the Irish countryside have been standing for a year or two and seem to cope with the wet, cold North Sea coastal weather pretty well, and most of those aren't even set in mortar. ;-) What I definitely would do is consider what kind of ...


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Run a strip of masking tape on the wall where the molding will cover it up, but where your nails will hit it. I hammer nails into old plaster all the time by putting a piece of masking tape on the wall and hammering into it. It holds the plaster together while the nail hits it and can easily be ripped off (gently) after I'm done hitting it. In your ...


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Marek's answer is what I'd expect to do. Thin In order to make the result a lot thinner than 10cm, what you can do is to use thinner support wood on the walls. Since the load is vertical you don't need substantial lumber there. I would also look into reducing the thickness of your pallet wood - you are only interested in the surface appearance and it ...


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1 king and one jack per side, assuming it's not an unusual load above. If your header has space above, make the jack continue up to the plate. Only caution is that even though the 6" fill looks good on paper, the slightest fatness in your framing materials coupled with a tiny bit of "out of plumb", might mean your door is a tight fit. Buy the dryest 2x ...


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Your question is concerning two things: 1. Proper fitting (wood planks to masonry wall). 2. Proper wood treatment (anti-moisture). So that's how will my answer look like. Let's look at this. 1. Proper fitting. I would advise preparing additional support planks going vertically with - say - 1 meter space (that spacing requires additional insight on how ...



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