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9

They look like the form clips where large forms were held in place to pour the walls. They can be handy as anchors if you add furring strips to drywall the walls instead of drilling for supports. They were just there for the pour and can be removed.


7

For form leftovers like this we usually hit them with the angle grinder and then go back and forth with pliers until it snaps at wall. I wouldn't just directly hammer these as you might be surprised at how big of a chunk of wall you take out with it.


4

They're left over from the forming system the contractor used. You may remove them by striking them sideways with a hammer or repeatedly bending them with any other tool. They're hardened steel and will snap off.


3

The link that BMitch left in the comments is a good guideline. The top 2 answers cover a lot of stuff to check. All in all the best way to check, since the ceiling will need repair anyway, is to remove enough drywall to see the top plate, which is still not a sure thing even if it is a double top plate. I have seen many homes built where non bearing walls ...


3

It looks like one layer of paper has separated from the other. The paper surrounding the tearout has loose flaps of paper around it too. Remove all loose paper and give a tight skim coat or two of paste spackle, sand smooth, prime and paint. You will be wise to get a 4" drywall knife to help in this. The little 1" knife that is considered a putty knife ...


2

No use in my experience, but maybe you could post some pics of the wall in question? I've found that actual rising damp is quite often misdiagnosed. More often it's the gradual rising of the outside ground level, poorly managed rainwater and surface water or even internal living conditions to name a few. Sometimes the walls joints are cracked or eroded and ...


2

In the UK, switches with fuses are normally used for high-power and/or permanently wired appliances such as heating systems, electric-showers, ovens and so on. It is possible your consumer unit (AKA distribution board or fusebox) has a circuit labelled for that outlet. I would check that and try to match up every circuit. A normal small UK home might have ...


2

That's an extremely long span for 2x8s, even tripled. Do you know whether there was ever an intermediate post? Most would suggest that you have a engineer look over your situation. Existing framing isn't always a good indicator of what to use. At any rate, a pair of 1-3/4" microlam (or laminated veneer lumber--LVL) beams will almost certainly suffice. The ...


2

End nailing into the brace will not be a useful and strong joint. Instead do something like the following where the brace is made of 2x lumber. Notch it as shown and set on edge and toe nailed from each side. Much stronger.


2

Yes. Google tells me that model is compatible with VESA mounting. For heavy screens, be sure to buy a mount that is rated sufficiently, and is attached to the structure of your wall. (So for drywall covered stud-framed walls, you'd want to be sure to attach to the structural wooden studs inside the wall, not just the gypsum wallboard.) You can use a stud ...


1

I called an engineer and paid for his evaluation of the wall. It's not load bearing. Realized that I left out some basics about the house. This house is built on a raised foundation with cripple walls attaching the floor joists to the foundation. The metal post is attached to the fireplace foundation (which is independent of the houses foundation). There is ...


1

Yes you can. First make sure you have a rough surface. Then apply several coats of stain killer. Make sure it's alcohol base. This means it has shellac in it which is an excellent sealer. I prefer zinzer it's not as sloppy as kilz. Then get some easysand drywall patch, mix it up and apply with wide knife. This is one way. I'm sure you will hear more.


1

This is a simple repair that should only take a bit of time. The repair shouldn't be rushed so that the result is a patch that is hard to detect. Here is what you should do: CAUTION must be used when working near electric wires and devices. It would be wise to shut off the breaker at the panel before attempting this repair! Remove loose plaster sections ...


1

The easy sand is a "light-weight" compound which is why it sands so easily. If you ever sanded this type of compound you'd see why it shouldn't be applied in thin layers. It sands off very easily. If it is applied as a skim coat it wouldn't last 1 or 2 passes with your sander. You will see this frequently on all types of wall patching products. If it has ...


1

If your description is accurate, it doesn't sound like a load bearing wall. A bearing wall would not transfer load through plywood, it would always transfer through structural members. However, you haven't shown any photos, diagrams, or blueprints. Because of that, there's no way for us to guarantee that it's not bearing. Remove the wall at your own risk.



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