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I have come across quite a few houses lately where they have back-to-back closets and we have generally turned these into two walk-ins vs. two traditional sliding door (shallow rectangle). If the wall is not load bearing it is simply demoing the walls, rerunning any electric, reframing where needed, lots of drywall patching and fixing the carpet/flooring ...


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Cleaning your walls won't help; you're only taking away the crud your termites output. Filling in the holes won't make a difference to the original problem of termites eating away at your structure. This might make things look good, but stuff is rotting away deep inside, and no amount of lipstick can fix that. Please call an exterminator. That's certainly ...


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Drill up into the wall Drill on an angle You could try and dill up from underneath at just the right angle. Though this might be difficult, since you may not have much room to work and getting the proper angle could be impossible. Use a flexible bit In some situations, there might be enough room available to get a flexible bit into position from ...


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Yellow pages (or google, or...) and "Structural steel" (or structural steel suppliers, fabricators, erectors, etc.) Many may not really want to work with you (there's not really any classification of "suppliers of one beam for a house project" so some of the companies listed may ONLY play in the "build a skyscraper" market) but that's who you need for ...


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Although the modern trend is fast stuffing more & more lumber in the wall, walls framed with 2x4s on 24" centers will support nearly any sort of roof load you're likely to ever see - especially if you don't live in a far northern climate. I've seen 2nd-floor hot tubs with far less support than that. You do have to be pretty careful laying out the studs; ...


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if the post is within the line of the walls: Blue is existing, red is nailing strips, green is bulkhead...


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Build a wall in front of the short wall with the studs oriented flat. Use a PT 2x2 for extending the sole plate. Block the end solid to the post with ripped studs as required to strengthen corner. Blocking is lumber used for additional nailing surfaces and/or to create rigidity in the direction perpendicular to the primary framing members. Solid blocking ...


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Things can yellow for a variety of reasons, water, smoking, etc etc etc. It really depends on the materials you are working with as well. If the wallpaper came off that easily, water is a good guess. What should I do? Lots of options, I have two suggestions (see below) Is it normal? for a house that old, normal is a relative term, Ill go with yes Is it ...


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A stud can hold much more weight than a 20 lb TV. However, since your mount extends, that 20 lbs will actually add a lot more force to the mounting location. You will still be fine as long as you are mounting directly to a wall stud. You should be certain that you are screwing it to the center of the stud. Also, follow the installation instructions with ...


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If you are thinking of using the existing phone wires to pull ethernet cable through the walls, the answer is most likely no. The phone wire is almost certainly smaller, so it will probably be passing through smaller holes. On top of that, it is likely stapled to the framing. That said, fishing new wire through the walls usually isn't that hard if you have ...


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Your approach is sound. I wouldn't bother toeing screws in from top/bottom. I would drill through both the stud and the filler board and attach with nuts/bolts/washers (as opposed to threading a screw into the stud). Two bolts above the bar and two below. Alternatively you can attach horizontal 2x4's across your studs with recessed lag bolts and then mount ...


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An alternative would be to hang one horizontal 2x6, 16-1/2" long, horizontally between two adjacent studs. That wouldn't be as sturdy as two vertical "married" studs, though. Yep, Toeing, or toenailing if you do it with nails. Nails TEND to be better - they're not as hard, but they're stronger than most equivalent screws. Another alternative would be to ...


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Quoid, do you live in an area subject to heavy snow loading? If you do, DO NOT remove those joists - they're responsible for holding your walls in as your roof exerts downward pressure from the snow's weight. Remove them, and the walls may blow outward as the garage collapses around you.


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For any load bearing construction, you want wood-on-wood carrying the load, rather than lateral bolts carrying a shearing load. Give your bed some legs. You can still screw it to the wall, but the load should be going from the wood frame, to wood legs, to floor.


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With something like this http://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-sds-plus-channelling-chisel-30mm/16724 If you are going to remove the skirting boards, a normal SDS chisel or drill bit is usually enough.


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Careful measuring and (for exterior walls) a right angle drill, generally does the trick. Note that from below you generally can't see where the walls are, as you're looking at floorboards.



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