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4

It's un-mortared blocks. No particular effort beyond that should be required, unless it's lined with plastic that needs holes poked in it. Every joint between blocks is a drainage point.


3

To get reliable USB over more than about 15 feet you'll have to use active extenders. I see a 31 foot active USB extension cable online for $15 right now. Good luck pulling the fat end through your walls, though. And it's only USB 2.0. What are you going to do when all your old in-wall USB cables are obsolete and none of your new devices want to work with ...


2

I know this is an old question, but this is a common issue: find a water plastic pipe into the wall, either to work on the pipe or to avoid punching it. In my case I was able to locate such pipes more than once using the sound of the water running through them as a guide. there are many ways to do that. Just let the water run through the pipe and use a ...


2

Some cowboy it and hope they don't hit anything. Others cut enough holes in the drywall (and/or floor, if carpeted) to see what they are doing. If using a camera system, those can be pretty small holes. Drywall repair is a heck of a lot cheaper than plumbing and electrical repair.


1

It is only an issue if it is load bearing. If it is load bearing then you cannot have part of your footing floating (in the first picture it definitely looks like the bottom plate is outside of concrete). Period. Is it a thing that has to get fix right away? No. Engineer will give you advice on fix. It is just a wall though and shouldn't be too costly. ...


1

Floor first. Tile. Cut out the the bottom of the drywall so that the tile can sit underneath it. Throw some cardboard on top of your tile, sit tile board on tile and put it up. Pull out cardboard. Caulk the gap. You are done and everything looks perfect.


1

In general you have the right idea with placing insulation between the thermal masses of two brick layers. This will work well in any climate. However, you can make some improvements. Here are a couple I can think of: Use thicker insulation. 5cm may not be enough. Shoot for 10 cm. Result: lower heating and cooling bills, greater interior comfort. Plaster ...


1

I've wondered this before, too. Honestly I wouldn't trust a horizontal tension rod shelf unless you're putting lightweight, and not breakable, things on it. I know you're renting, but you could install shelves with braces and then just patch the holes when you leave, assuming you can find similar paint. Another alternative is just something like ...


1

Select a location between studs where the space does not contain any electricial devices, and it seems that it would not contain pipes devices. Drill through the top plate with a larger drill bit, of 'standard' length. Put a dowel, or single piece of solid wire in the hole until it touches the bottom. Tap both walls and both studs in the space while you ...


1

Some confusion in the comments - this is USB in every room. It sounds like you may want a Pi in every room The System I show works like this: [USB 3.0] [USB 3.0] [USB3.0] | | / Ethernet - Ethernet - Ethernet - [USB 3.0] | | [USB 3.0] [USB 3.0] USB 3.0 in 6 places If you only want USB 2.0, the adapters are only $8 If ...


1

You indicate that you have been in a drought since October. Combine cooler weather, better insulated roof, and heat being on; the structural framing of the house may have shrunk. I experience some "seasonal" cracking and shrinkage in my home. See what it looks like in July/August, if the condition persists, consult a local experienced contractor.



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