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11

I never had luck with chemicals... steamer & lots of elbow grease was the only thing that worked for us :-\


10

You will need to take off all the glue if you want a good finish. The paint will lift the glue, but unevenly, and mix with the paint. This will cause the paint to clump and not cover properly and all in all it will look terrible. I know because I did this in the first house I owned and had to wash the walls of the one room where I tried this several times ...


8

Of course you can. Future owners of the house will swear at you to no end, but that's their problem, right? ;)


7

It depends :) It really depends on how old the wallpaper is, if there are multiple wallpapers glued over each other and how much glue was used. If the wallpaper is not too old, and was put on in a proper way, usually, a steamer works very well. It has the advantage that it loosens the glue without making the wallpaper to fragile to pull it off. I usually ...


7

You can, some wall papers are designed to be painted over (I once dealt with a building that had wall paper that was designed to reinforce old plaster walls and then be painted), although most is not. Make sure you remove any loose pieces, and cut out any bubbles that have formed. Patch any uneven spots (where you cut the paper, seams, other marks). Sand ...


6

I would never recommend this doing this, but this should give you decent results: Pull off anything that is peeling up. Seal it with an oil or shellac based primer (not water based since that will loosen the paper). Once sealed, skim coat it with drywall mud to cover the seams/texturing. Sand, prime again, and paint.


6

If removing it's not an option, you may want to try a textured paint roller to hide any texture or seams that the wallpaper has. Also, you should start with an oil based primer, since water based paint and primer can actually seep through the wallpaper and loosen it from the wall.


6

I don't think sanding the surface will produce a surface good enough to paint. It's certainly a lot of effort for uncertain results. If the underlying surface is very rough it might still show through the wall paper, unless it's very thick (1000 gsm lining paper for example) or you do some sanding. The best answer might be to continue to peel off the paper ...


6

Dow, a manufacturer of XPS products, on their India web site, does not recommend using XPS under a roof deck. This is due to the possibility of condensation occurring between the insulation and the structure. As far as painting goes, US codes require a 15 minute thermal barrier over an interior foam, in the event of fire. This could be satisfied by gypsum ...


5

Unfortunately stripping woodchip can be a long, arduous process. The way we've found best is to work in small(ish) areas score the area with a knife run a scraper across the surface to knock out some of the chips The last two expose some of the paper and give a route for the steam to enter. Then steam this area and scrape again - but don't expect to ...


5

Yes you should still mud, tape and sand all of the drywall joints especially if your drywall has beveled edges. Ideally you would also apply a coat of primer before you apply the wall paper as this makes removing it easier down the road, and if you do ever decide to paint it, at least all you'll need to do is remove the wall paper and paint and not have to ...


5

Please yes! I am literally 90% done doing a complete remodel of my house. Other than the aluminum wiring that I have replaced the #1 biggest stupid thing I have dealt with is the 20 (no exaggeration) different types of wallpaper put on the house in 1967 during the custom build. Out of the 20 only 3-4 types (2 specific rooms) had primer. Those two rooms ...


4

The finish you get will depend on surface of the wallpaper. If it's a smooth paper then you should be OK just to paint over it. You will notice where the paper is though as it will have a slightly different texture to the rest of the wall. If it's a textured paper then you'd have to use filler to smooth it out first. However, most wall papers have (at ...


4

You can rent a steamer to remove the wall paper. You might also try wetting it with a spray bottle and letting it soak. It will be tough to not damage the drywall paper so be prepared to spackle it.


4

I am attacking my woodchip coated walls with a powered multi tool fitted with a scraper. This takes the painted layer off the woodchip in satisfying strips. When this is complete, stage 2 is to use sponge to wet the paper, leave to soak or use a steamer stripper to wet the paper and scrape away.


4

I would guess that your issue is that you didn't prime first. From Wikipedia: A primer or undercoat is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. Priming ensures better adhesion of paint to the surface, increases paint durability, and provides additional protection for the material being painted You buy primer from the same store you ...


4

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


3

I am in the middle of a similar project right now! It's in an RV, where the wallpaper is over plywood, maybe 1/4", but quite soft. Any scraping would damage the plywood quite a bit. If I really wanted to remove the wallpaper, I would probably remove the plywood, too, but that's a bigger project than this 22-year-old RV deserves. The quality of a paint job ...


3

Painting over paper is normal in the UK, there is even “lining paper” that is designed to be painted over. There are 3 issues you may get: Will the water in the new paint unglue the paper from the wall? Will the new paint stick to the paper? The paper will be harder to remove when someone has to, much harder if you use a oil based paint like other ...


3

You can paint over wallpaper - we had to do that when we moved into our current house - the prior owner had put the wallpaper directly on the drywall. First, clean it as much as possible to remove grease, dirt, etc. Remove any loose paper, although you may be able to re-glue them in order to keep a consistent pattern, since you've stated you don't mind the ...


3

A steamer is by far the best option: I've had great success even with multiple layers of woodchip. (Ugh!) It can definitely help to rough the surface of the paper before steaming, especially if it's been painted. If it's a real mess then it is actually feasible to plaster over paper, but I'd personally not recommend that approach unless you know a good ...


3

I've removed all the wallpaper from our house. In the three bedrooms, it was painted over. I think I've seen the gamut of wallpaper removal. Easy Wallpaper just stripped off in nice sheets. This was in the dining room. It wasn't painted over. It took Maybe 15 minutes to do a 14' x 10' room. Hard This is the technique we used for two of the bedrooms where ...


3

A mixture of warm water and vinegar works well. or you could substitute fabric softener if the vinegar smell bothers you. Apply a liberal amount with a spray bottle or rag, wait, and peel.


3

I've found you don't need a steamer or special chemicals. If you do use a steamer, be really careful not to damage the wall. Plaster will break apart, for example. Instead, I've used one of those wallpaper scoring tools to cut small holes in the surface. Then, apply hot water from a spray bottle liberally over the paper and let sit for 30 minutes or so. ...


3

I have witnessed surprising results by covering wallpaper with a thick layer of wet joint compound, right out of the 5 gal bucket. We call it "mud" in my region. Let it sit a while, and the moisture and weight will almost remove the wallpaper by itself. Try it yourself on a small area and see if it will work in your application.


3

If you don't mud it, the wallpaper is gonna highlight every screw, seam and flaw. It will have air bubbles over every screw and gap. Would look like a real hack job. Anything worth doing is worth doing well.


3

Some ideas hang up fabric? go to a large format printer (sign shop) and print banners and hang those? get $10 shower panelling from Home Depot and tack those up on the wall (and paint on those) don't bother with a 'theme' for the baby's room. I know a lot of people like to do it, but it's a lot of work, the kid doesn't really care, and they grow out of it ...


3

We used to carefully use water and it would come off pretty easily with some gentle scraping. Just do not crazy soak the wall. If you keep the wallpaper damp you should be able to carefully remove it with a scraper. It should not hurt the drywall especially if there is paint on it. Try this on a small area first. Home Depot has a good description on ...


3

Definitely read up on the EPA 'renovation repair and painting' rule. Option #3, the 1/4" drywall, is likely to produce the best and cleanest results, at the cost of loss of room space and alteration in the look of all your trim. You'll have to extend all outlets also. Of course that sounds suspiciously like what happened last time. Eventually your room ...


3

The previous owners of my house did this. Drywall compound will stick very well to wood paneling (please resist the urge to get "creative" with the texture...). Wallpaper, less so, and even if it sticks well, if the wallpaper ever started peeling off, it would take the top part of the wall with it. If you're going down this route, I would highly recommend ...



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