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5

Zipties (aka cable ties). Be sure to use ones that are UV-resistant. Cost pennies each, strong enough for the application you're talking about, non-damaging and non-permanent, and easy to remove when done.


2

If you didn't put insulation and/or a poly vapor barrier over the bare dirt before you poured the basement slab, you made a mistake, and that mistake is causing moisture in the soil to wick into the concrete, keeping it saturated with water. That's very difficult to fix now, but vinyl will not mold, so you may be okay. If you're really worried about it, you ...


2

You don't have to caulk something just because you normally caulk it. There is a reason why everything is done and learning this will save you time and money. Since you've had the home for a year already, I'd guess that you know if water leaks in or if you can feel drafts near them? If so, caulk it. If you have a reasonable doubt that they might not be ...


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If you have municipal trash collection, you'll want to contact the company in charge of pickup. It's quite common for them to have a website, which typically has information about how to handle various types of waste. If you're not sure who handles the collection. That information is usually available on the town/city website, or by calling the town/city....


2

I have seen vinyl floors where the glue was put down unevenly (sparingly in some areas), and by comparison the areas without enough glue were visibly damaged on top from wear. So, I think that (for whatever reason) vinyl floors which are not (well) attached have a shorter lifespan. However, you might want to look into floating vinyl floors (here's a random ...


1

The best solution I can think of in your situation is to put down really cheap floating laminate flooring. This type of flooring is easy to install, and you don't have to worry about any glue. When you leave, you don't have to explain to the landlord what you did to the floor, you can just pick up the floor and leave it like it was when you moved in. You ...


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I have found an easy way if you are going to recover the floor with some other type of floor covering first i heat an iron and soften tile by laying iron over cloth so tile lifts easily then i sprinkle the floor with fine sawdust and rub in i leave the sawdust fir 15 minutes while lifting more tiles then brush off excess when completed the area i wish to ...


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The approach is usually progressive. You try a less aggressive cleaner to see if it works, and if not, then move on to a more aggressive. At some point, you may find that the cleaner damages the surface, so test in an inconspicuous area. I would use paper towels and a mild scrubbing pad, and I would use cleaners in the following order: a soap based ...


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Just the trash, if you can cut it up. Or, you'll have to setup for a Bulk Trash Pickup with your Township, likely $10 for that stuff. But no recycling program will accept that & only Blinds To Go takes working vinyl blinds.


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I've used that material before and cut it with a sharp razor blade and a clamped straightedge. I didn't use scissors because like you said, there's really no way to get a good clean cut. I agree that something like a router will generate too much heat, and could just not cut it at all because of it's rubbery flexibility.



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