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4

I don't think using two different heights is a good idea. For one, you'll introduce water pooling, depending on where the heights vary. For another, you're ensuring that the vinyl is always under the risk of stress where different heights meet under the same sheet. The easy solution is to use only one height of hardboard - stick to either 2mm or 3mm.


2

Buy tall trim to cover up the glue issues or just skim coat the whole area. You will spend more time tying to get this off clean then ripping and skim coating the area.


1

I ended up speaking with a pool leak detection company, and they answered this question for me. Basically, yes you can over tighten the screws, but not if you're careful. Their suggestion was to always hand-tighten the screws until they are "wrist tight" (as noted in the comments above, formal measurements are not available). The screws should be good and ...


1

Your options are pretty much infinite. I'd favor gypcrete to raise, level and provide a nice base, then tile. Nothing to rot when the next leak happens (it's a bathroom, there will always be a next leak.) I'd also put radiant floor heat tubing in place in the gypcrete pour, and if there's enough room for sleepers (now), XPS [extruded polystyrene] insulation ...


1

Visit your local tool rental store. They will have something that will make this much easier. There is pneumatic scrapers and concrete grinders For the hardwood laminate you dont not need to even remove the old tile but to lay ceramic tile you should


1

Obviously the best bet would be to replace the tile, if it's tile, if it's sheet vinyl well... If you have ANY of the material left over, you can cut out a patch and replace it, use a liquid seam sealer to make it look good... You can purchase a vinyl sealer, that will basically attempt to fill in the gouge, use of lacquer thinner is required, as this is ...


1

The problem is that the glue sticks to the paper better than the paper sticks to the gypsum. You need to weaken the glue. As an experiment, try heating up a small patch with a blow drier and see if it works. If it does, go out and buy an electric heat gun.


1

Done. Turns out that there's no glue under the underlayment, instead it's just luaun plywood sheets that are stapled extremely well to the subfloor. Once I was able to grab an edge, it was relatively easy to pry the entire thing off, one sheet at a time.


1

You are looking for leveling compound for concrete. That link is to one of many of Home Depot's choices for a fast setting mix which can be up to one inch thick. The reviews say the instructions should be carefully followed; many rave about the results. I imagine if you mucked up the application, it could be difficult to correct. (I have only done ...



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