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6

You could try vinyl plugs that can be found in hardware/home improvement stores. The plugs come in various diameters. If there isn't one for the hole's size, you may have to drill it larger to the size of the plug so that it will fit. Also found this kit, may be this will be an alternative option.


5

Unfortunately, you NEED to remove or cover the old vinyl. If you attempt to tile over an unsecure base, you are wasting yout time and money because the tile will not stay down. In your case, if you go over the splitting vinyl, the vinyl will continue to separate and up will come the tiles. If you go over the paper layer, the mortar/quickset will not stick ...


5

I have vinyl in my new (to me) home (the blinds are probably as old as the house, about 30 years old), and my parents have had weighted cloth blind slats in their roughly 20-year-old home. Both have generally stood up pretty well, but depending on exactly what you expect them to withstand, they have different strengths and weaknesses. Cloth: Generally ...


5

The bubble doesn't necessarily mean it wasn't glued, but rather that air became trapped under the vinyl while it was being put down - which means that the people putting it down didn't do it properly. When installing vinyl, it should be unrolled slowly, with even pressure being applied along the length of the floor as it's being unrolled (slow, tedious ...


4

I don't think using two different heights is a good idea. For one, you'll introduce water pooling, depending on where the heights vary. For another, you're ensuring that the vinyl is always under the risk of stress where different heights meet under the same sheet. The easy solution is to use only one height of hardboard - stick to either 2mm or 3mm.


2

set your door with available shimming it in place then use a 4000 psi rated NON SHRINK grout this will harden and will not allow the door to move .be sure its non shrink use a small trowel to push to grout under the jam don't try and get away with only using your hands the trial will help you make sure you have no air bubble so there will be no room for ...


2

Buy tall trim to cover up the glue issues or just skim coat the whole area. You will spend more time tying to get this off clean then ripping and skim coating the area.


2

Does it line up with a hole or notch in the top of the window when it is closed? Then it was for a security pin or other lock. The easiest thing would be to glue a larger piece of thin vinyl over it. Anything else is going to be more noticeable unless you are a master craftsman.


1

You will certainly need to provide for some drainage of the now "lower" track of the window so that accumulated water can flow out. One thing to also consider is the overall design of the window itself. Many window units are designed with a definite UP and DOWN side to them. When you rotate such window by 90 degrees certain aspects of the window may be ...


1

I ended up speaking with a pool leak detection company, and they answered this question for me. Basically, yes you can over tighten the screws, but not if you're careful. Their suggestion was to always hand-tighten the screws until they are "wrist tight" (as noted in the comments above, formal measurements are not available). The screws should be good and ...


1

Your options are pretty much infinite. I'd favor gypcrete to raise, level and provide a nice base, then tile. Nothing to rot when the next leak happens (it's a bathroom, there will always be a next leak.) I'd also put radiant floor heat tubing in place in the gypcrete pour, and if there's enough room for sleepers (now), XPS [extruded polystyrene] insulation ...


1

Visit your local tool rental store. They will have something that will make this much easier. There is pneumatic scrapers and concrete grinders For the hardwood laminate you dont not need to even remove the old tile but to lay ceramic tile you should


1

Obviously the best bet would be to replace the tile, if it's tile, if it's sheet vinyl well... If you have ANY of the material left over, you can cut out a patch and replace it, use a liquid seam sealer to make it look good... You can purchase a vinyl sealer, that will basically attempt to fill in the gouge, use of lacquer thinner is required, as this is ...


1

The problem is that the glue sticks to the paper better than the paper sticks to the gypsum. You need to weaken the glue. As an experiment, try heating up a small patch with a blow drier and see if it works. If it does, go out and buy an electric heat gun.


1

Done. Turns out that there's no glue under the underlayment, instead it's just luaun plywood sheets that are stapled extremely well to the subfloor. Once I was able to grab an edge, it was relatively easy to pry the entire thing off, one sheet at a time.


1

You are looking for leveling compound for concrete. That link is to one of many of Home Depot's choices for a fast setting mix which can be up to one inch thick. The reviews say the instructions should be carefully followed; many rave about the results. I imagine if you mucked up the application, it could be difficult to correct. (I have only done ...


1

I can't answer for certain, but adhesive is still adhesive (no different than laying vinyl on top of vinyl), so I would assume (possibly incorrectly) that the adhesive is similar. I can only say what I would do if this were something I was going to try -- my thought would be to clean first with a good degreaser, then with vinegar and water so that I had an ...


1

Make a 4" dia plug from a 1x6 or plywood, screw eyelet into center, clamp plug into dryer vent with worm gear clamp. Pull through with your fish tape. Perhaps a taped cone could be centered over the plug (and the fish tape lead through the center, for better insulation tracking). Down the road this lint brush will remove any buildup. This one has a 10ft ...



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