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16

I would cut the bottom of the trim so the tile can slide underneath. Then you only need to approximate the shape of the tile, but you don't have to worry about perfect edges. I've used the Dremel Multi-Max with the 3/4" flush cut blade to cut base trim and door jambs so I could slide hardwood flooring underneath. I borrowed a friend's and decided I needed ...


9

Use an iron! It is cheaper and less damaging to your lungs. Let the iron sit on the tile for about 30 seconds and it will pop right off, then move on to the next one. I renovate homes and have done it numerous times. I have well over 14000 sqft under my belt.


8

I'd agree with @aphoria about just cutting back the trim (unless this is a temporary job, as you're not going to be able to extend it later if the floor gets lowered). ... but I wouldn't use a dovetail saw. Yes, the fine teeth will minimize tearing, but the handle placement and rigid spine make it much more difficult to get a horizontal cut. Instead, try ...


6

I'd echo what Tester101 is saying. Going with vinyl vs cermaic is really a question of the style and price of home in relation to others in the area. Whether the price of the house is dramatically affected by this decision is hard to tell. Does it match the rest of the house? For example, if your bathroom has a walk-in glass shower that's done in granite ...


5

I have used this product myself: DAP floor leveling compound It is thick enough that it does not actually seek self-level, but it can be used with a good straight scrim to get to "TRUE" which means "flat not necessarily level/plum". This should be perfect for you. Follow up with a 1/8" layer of plywood if you like.


5

Yep, it's actually pretty easy. For the most part it'll peel up, you just need a good scraper (available at Home Depot in the flooring tools aisle) to get up the stuck down parts. Don't worry about getting all the glue up, just get the majority of the chunks up so that the floor is smooth.


5

Instead of trying to work with the flooring in a cramped space, I use a roll of craft paper and sticky tape to make a template of the room. Start in the center of the room, lightly stick a strip to the ground, and cut it at the edges of the room. You get a cleaner edge by going a little past the edge, then folding the cut edge back and sticking it down ...


5

Option 1: Try some nail polish of an appropriate colour. It's not a perfect fix by any means, but it is cheap, and you are replacing soon. Option 2: Cut out the entire 'tile' on the 'grout' lines and cut a matching piece from leftovers if you have any. Glue it down with contact cement. The edge of the patch will collect dirt and become ugly pretty fast. ...


4

It seems to depend on the range of flooring that you choose. I found a video on YouTube showing it without the tongues, and I also found a seller with some photographs showing the tongues on the edges of a piece. This review backs up that assessment: Loose Lay Vinyl Plank Flooring (you literally can just unbox the floor and then install without glue ...


4

Is the glue residue hard and rough or soft and gummy? If it's hard, a 6" floor scraper should break it loose, maybe with a heat gun or some boiling water to loosen it a bit. If it's soft and gummy, the scraper should get it by itself, or you can try some acetone or mineral spirits to dissolve it (make sure you ventilate the area well, and take frequent ...


3

One product I know of that is meant for this type of scenario is Dricore. It provides a moisture barrier from the floor. DRIcore has an integrate high density polyethylene membrane bonded to the underside of the panel which provides an excellent moisture barrier I've never used it personally though it seems pretty popular in my neck of the woods. I'd ...


3

Definitely remove the vinyl no matter what the subfloor is. Especially if it is on particle board. Do the job right and don't listen to so-called carpenters giving bad advice and cutting corners. Remove that particle board too and add plywood to get your heights level. You will never be disappointed doing a job the right way!! Good Luck


3

Use a heat gun to heat up the tiles and soften the adhesive underneath and pry it up with something (putty knife/scraper/pry bar). You should be able to buy floor adhesive remover to get the stuff off of the bottom tiles you want to keep. I found some that was a sort of gel that you spread around on the floor and let it sit for 15 - 30 minutes. Then, ...


3

You could use a profile gauge. They are also known as contour gauges. You push this against your architrave (the doorway trim) and you get the profile you need to cut. You then transfer this to what ever you are cutting (the vinyl in this case) by drawing round the shape. You then use a sharp knife to cut along the line. The Wikipedia entry has a couple of ...


3

I have run into the same situation many times. Let me say first, that I don't condone doing work that requires permits without them, as it often leads to crappy quality or safety issues. I always prefer to do quality work, but occasionally budgets make it necessary to do a quicky fix. In your case, the most important thing is to strip away all old wax and ...


3

When I lived in MN I had the same issue. I opted to stain the concrete floor. I liked the looked, it was affordable, and as long as I ran a dehumidifier (a requirement in most any mid-western basement anyways) there was no water worries at all. I'd never put carpet in a basement. Been in too many carpeted basements with a definite mildew smell to scare me ...


3

Kerosene is a solvent and, like vinyl, also a hydrocarbon. Their molecular structure causes them to bind together, and if left untreated the kerosene will soften and possibly dissolve the vinyl. You can use a solution of water and mild soap such as dish detergent to break the bond and soak up the kerosene. Do not flood the floor with the solution. Use ...


2

I agree with aphoria about cutting under the trim. The best tool for this is a dovetail saw. Lay your vinyl next to the door, place the saw flat on top, create yourself a nice snug pocket to slide the flooring under. As far as cutting the vinyl, you can use a heat gun to soften the material first to make an easier/cleaner cut with your utility knife.


2

I've been there, and it's really tough. I had a stiff paint scraper which I heated up with a soldering torch, and it helped a little, but not much. Realistically, use a sledgehammer and lay a new subfloor. That stuff is nasty to get off.


2

They are easier to remove if you heat them with a good hair dryer or a heat gun. Unfortunately, I don't know how to remove the remaining glue.


2

Scraping off the vinyl would be best. Another possibility, if you are OK with raising the floor and fixtures (including raising the toilet flange), would be to mechanically fasten down a tile underlayment over top of the vinyl. You could use a membrane like Schluter Ditra or a cement board-type product, then install the ceramic tiles over that. You might ...


2

Just for fun, this is what the floor looked like half way through: in the background a finished 'flat' bit, in the foreground, freshly-laid (spilt?) 'self-leveling' compound. And some anecdotal photos: cutting vinyl planks with a hooked blade can be risky...


2

I'm surprised no one mentioned asbestos. Apparently it's common in old/70s vinyl flooring. Stirring it up and be a huge health risk. I plan to get take a sample and get it tested


2

Sounds like you're looking for Vinyl flooring with a wood pattern, which means the pros/cons list would look something like this... Vinyl Pros Affordable. Easy to clean. Easy to install. Fairly durable. Many patterns available. Moisture resistant. Quieter. Softer under foot. Cons Damaged by heavy/sharp objects. Not great for resale value. Prone to ...


2

OK, first obvious question: Where did all the corners go? Did they get cut off? Is this sheet goods or adhesive tiles of some type? I think it is sheet goods from the pics. Until I get a bit more info, here are a couple of ideas for ya. Short of starting from scratch, go ahead and glue down the flooring as you have it in the pics. If you have any extra ...


2

You can use quarter round to extend your baseboards and cover small gaps. If the gap is really large you can cut a new larger piece of the flooring and line it up with the current floor in order to create a hopefully invisible seam. I think it generally looks better to have two large pieces with a seam instead of one large piece and one small piece.


2

I lived in a house that had standing water once or twice a year. It had a pad with berber(?) carpet on top. It dried easy with a space heater and fan within a day of these wet periods. Usually a 5x10 foot area got wet. When I went to pull up the carpet both the carpet and pad were in perfect condition. I asked a friend who had done installations for ...


2

Vinyl isn't very thick, and it is quite plastic. This means that over time, it will conform to the shape of the floor beneath. This means that you will see grooves in the vinyl where there are gaps between the plywood sheets. This means you want the sub-floor to be as smooth as possible. BUT!!!! you need gaps between the sheets to allow for expansion or ...


1

If these are minor holes that don't cause loss of function of the floor, I think they are probably "wear and tear" that is a legally mandated part of every rental agreement (in the USA), so you could not worry about it and leave them be... Per your question, properly glued this is way the professionals patch. I have noticed that they tend to put a little ...



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