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Sounds like dehumidification might be the answer. The cause of the dank "basement" smell, is high humidity. Removing moisture from the air is a side effect of refrigeration, which is why the air conditioner helps. A dehumidifier is just like an air conditioner, except that the dehumidifier heats the air back up after cooling it and removing moisture. You ...


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I would only let the fan run constantly or on manual as you suggest if you have a variable speed fan in the unit that will change based on the call for heat/cool.


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The gable vents are short-circuiting the ventilation. The holes appear to be adequate, but as there's a shorter path of less resistance from in the gable vents and out the ridge vents, the holes don't draw very much air. I'd temporarily cover the gable vents from the inside and see how things change. Maybe take temperature and humidity readings at ...


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Location and placement are the top concerns for windows if they are to be used as your primary source of cooling. There's probably computer software for flow diagnostics now; architects used to have to build mock-ups and run colored water through them. You might want vertical casement windows and/or awnings to deal with the rain. Additionally, I recommend a ...


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What an interesting set of challenges. I would spend some time studying passive cooling and attempt to incorporate the best possible concepts that you can find that would apply to your locale. I was always fascinated by a solar chimney that uses the heat of the sun to create a draft effect drawing air into the house as the hot air exits the chimney. This ...


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It's hard to tell from the product page, but it looks like this is just an ionizer, with no fan or filter. If so, then all it does is emit ions; it doesn't remove anything. The theory is that it will charge particles (e.g. birch pollen), which will then attach itself to nearby surfaces, thereby cleaning the air. Unfortunately, these are more effective at ...


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YES/NO. I could find two answers: no and yes. The no was marketed by manufacturers of large air purifiers containing full-blown HEPA while the yes by the below research on asthma, disabilities and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Because people allergic to birch pollen are more likely to develop such disabilities unless proper interventions, this material ...



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