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21

A bathroom exhaust fan should vent directly outside with its own dedicated duct, for exactly the reasons you are stating.


18

NO!!! The vent will expand and contract and break the glass. You need to go through the cinder blocks (preferable, but if you must, go through the concrete). Also, with double paned glass, there is usually an inert gas (or Nitrogen) sealed in between the panes. Drilling it will break the seal. My advice: Get someone to do it for you. It is unlikely you ...


17

Aside from the fact that your attic can be very dirty, you need to be concerned about the following: If you have any gas heating equipment in the attic (central heat, water heater(s)), they may not meet regulations to allow them to be connected to the house's main air supply. You can run a major carbon monoxide (CO) risk from improper ventilation of ...


16

According to Chicago Building Code 18-28-504.1 Installation. Clothes dryers shall be exhausted in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Dryer exhaust systems shall be independent of all other systems and shall convey the moisture and any products of combustion to the outside of the building. Exception: Where the make and ...


14

I would say that this is highly dangerous. It is against US and Canadian code to not have outside ventilation for any fuel-burning appliance in your home; that's your furnace, HWH and stove/oven, assuming all are NG or propane. It is only acceptable to have a "filter-only" vent hood for your stove if it's all-electric (which BTW is the case for every single ...


12

There's two issues here. The first is the CO alarm. SOMETHING is wrong. It may be the stove, or some other combustion device in your house, but it's definitely something to pay attention to. I'd suggest getting a second CO detector and place it around the house and monitor the levels carefully. If it's the stove, it's less of a ventilation issue and more of ...


12

They sell inline lint traps, that can be installed along the exhaust vent. This should catch most; if not all of the excess lint, and give you a convenient easy way to clean the lint. The lint should be cleaned often (along with the dryers internal lint trap), to increase dryer efficiency and decrease the chance of fire. Keep in mind, these are ...


11

Depends on your climate I guess, but around here in the winter my roof is covered with snow and the attic is cold even on a sunny day. It seems that if your attic is warmer than your house in the winter, then you either have an insulation or ventilation problem.


11

Usually a dryer vent will have a spring loaded flap where it exits the house to prevent outside air (and bugs, rodents, etc) from coming in through the pipe. If you are getting airflow from outside through your vent pipe, it sounds like either you don't have one or it isn't closing. I would check that first.


10

That pipe looks like an air intake. All "direct vent" style appliances (high efficiency on-demand water heater, gas fireplace, etc.) have an isolated air intake and it is common to have it suck in air from outside the building so as not to force air infiltration through doors, windows, etc. Indeed, that is ugly. Our fireplace and tankless water heater ...


9

My grandfather was a carpenter and when he retired he moved most of his tools into his basement. This included a drill press, bandsaw, and a very heavy full size table saw. It is definitely doable. Drill presses and bandsaws don't generally create as much dust as sanders and routers. You can probably remove most of the dust they'd create with a well placed ...


7

I have my entire woodworking workshop in my basement. Plenty of people have basement workshops. Just get a portable dust collector like this one: Get good filter bags that filter down to at least 5 microns, smaller is better. And a remote controlled air filtration system like this one to hang from the ceiling. Drill presses make very little dust. ...


7

Have a look at the 2006 International Residential Code. Here are a few sections that may apply. Chapter 15 - Exhaust Systems SECTION M1501 GENERAL M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors. Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl ...


7

Your house is more than likely Balloon Framed. Stick and Platform framing hadn't come into being in 1900. In a balloon-framed house, the studs you see in the basement run all the way up to the roof. The filler material is a concrete mixture that was used as a partial fireblock and also to hold the spacing of the studs. You can put a hole through the ...


7

Great Stuff makes a fireblock sealant that is minimal expanding. It's actually specifically designed for penetrations between floors and through fire walls (required in commercial situations, but works equally well here).


6

After reading all the questions and answers in the comments (including my own), I think I finally have a good enough understanding of your situation to answer. And the answer is - in your case, fiberglass insulation will help, but you have to be careful about how you apply it. Why? The point of insulation is to create a thermal break that prevents the ...


6

As far as I know, it doesn't really matter as long as it's vented outside. Venting into the attic is Very Bad -- in the winter, the humid air will condense and (if cold enough) freeze, and you'll effectively have water in the attic. For any vents, the straighter the run is, the more efficient and quieter it is. Avoid corrugated pipes, and avoid bends and ...


6

I would completely disagree with your builder. Since it is a new garage, I do see merit in the "build it in" approach. There are two important considerations: how many CFM do you need and what kind of noise level is tolerable? Are you using anything flammable? Water based paints should not be a problem but solvent based paints require special attention. ...


6

You have two problems really and you can choose to solve one, the other or both. First is the easier one, securing your doors so they can't be opened by the air. As Gunner mentioned, a ball latch/catch might work however they are designed to allow the door to open with a bit of force. Other options include a bolt that you manually open at the ...


6

Most crawl spaces are vented if they have an earth floor or are prone to moisture. If you insulate between the floor joists with a moisture, mold and vermin resistant insulation (foam as we discussed before) you would still want some ventilation. The only time I would seal the exterior walls would be if I also used a pretty darn water tight moisture barrier ...


6

HVAC systems don't exchange air with the outside unless you specifically add an air exchanger. In older houses, this wasn't necessary because they leaked enough that you always got new fresh air coming in somewhere. With newer houses and recently fully renovated ones, the houses can indeed be sealed up so air tight that an air exchanger is necessary. Based ...


5

Have you considered changing to a ridge vent? The larger area of venting would give you more efficiency, it can be shingled over to hide it, the filtered ones a piece of material to prevent insects and dirt from getting in, and this one appears to not leak even under high winds: ...


5

You should use a separate outlet for the pipe as the existing vents won't be able to cope with the volume of air and you'll probably end up with steam in the loft. Did you buy a kit or separate components? If you've got a kit then there should be an outlet grille in that, if not you should be able to get one at the same place you bought the fan and flex ...


5

Well first, the outlet being at-grade is a no-no for those pest reasons. They don't have to get up the vertical pipe to cause problems; a mouse or bird can nest in there and cause problems. They did it anyway because it was easier to run it down through the crawl space then up to the ceiling (where, if this is your garage, they'd then have to build a sealed ...


5

Just get an electric condenser dryer, we have a Bosch WTW84560GB that is great, it also uses a lot less power than the older models that need venting.


5

Depending on the type of duct you have, 25 feet and two elbows may be near or over the length limit for dryer vents without a booster fan. This website lists the limits.


5

Your inspector is correct. Air should enter at the soffit, and exit at either roof vents or a ridge vent. With the current setup air could be entering either the soffit vents or the roof vents, and exiting either the roof vents or the ridge vent. Since your soffits are covered with insulation (because there are no baffles), I'd guess that air is entering ...


5

The dryer vent and the combustion vent are one and the same. If you try to use the dryer vent for heating you will have two issues, first excess moisture and second carbon monoxide. Gas dryers get their efficiency by directly venting the combustion into the damp clothes which then by the way of evaporation drastically reduces the temp of the heat. It ...


4

It is possible that the previous dryer was a stacked unit with the dryer mounted above the washer.The general rule for dryer vents is not any longer than necessary.Two concerns I have are the flex hose if you can replace it with an elbow do that if not use metallic flex not the plastic type.The second concern is if you live in an area that sees snowfall ...



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