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Residential clothes dryers typically vent at a temperature of around 130°-165°F (54°-74°C). Wikipedia gives the glass transition temperature (colloquially the melting point) of ABS as 221°F (105°C). Even assuming that you get a perfect heat transfer, you'll be fine.


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It is most likely one of your capacitors. Some single-phase motors (which your fan has) have just a Start Capacitor and some have both a Start and Run capacitor. A motor circuit is simple. A couple switches, a couple capacitors, and the motor windings (inductors). If your fan still works after start-up, it's almost certainly not the windings. Windings ...


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It may be that your start capacitor is dying out. If it works when you turn it on, then it can't be a contacts issue. It's possible the windings in your motor are wearing down or shorted, hence the extra current draw and the delay. Again you might have a ton of gunk in there.


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Probably kitchen gunk on the switch contacts. It takes that long for the contacts to "sink" through the gunk. Replace the switch,


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If you know the brand name, you can look up the technical specs even for discontinued models. Usually it will be a PDF file that includes a schematic. It does sound like an electrical problem. It could be something like a cracked solder joint that expands and connects after heating up that initial thirty seconds.


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Check your roof vent for clogging on lint right at the exit. Ideally... your dryer should terminate at the closest point outdoors. I personally on a weekend and a bit of money, would just punch a hole through the wall and vent that way. The longer the run of vent the more resistance the dryer has to overcome. If the tube is the ribbed tubing, that adds a ...


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There should (must?) be a vent on the roof. If you can get up there, take the hat off of the vent and run a fishtape though the vent. (A fishtape is long, skinny, flexible steel or fiberglass rod that electricians use to run wire through conduit.) Once you've got the fishtape to the other end, tie a nylon rope to the tape and pull it through. After that, ...


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Dryer vents need regular maintenance. Period. No one ever does it, of course, which is why every time you buy a new house, you pretty much need to replace the old vent because no one ever cleaned it out. Ideally, you'd clean the lint out every 6 months or so. A booster fan can help, but doesn't necessarily eliminate any of the maintenance. Plus, you now ...


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Definitely get the booster fan. We installed one in our old house. It worked quite well. They cost about $200 and you can pick them up at places like Home Depot. It sounds like your venting tube is probably very long. The booster fan will help force the gunk out.


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They're often called dryer booster fans. They aren't particularly difficult to install, and they are reasonably effective. However, they also have some significant downsides - the fan itself obstructs the the vent pipe, which makes it much more difficult to effectively clean the vent, and it will further reduce airflow and increase lint accumulation should ...


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Check the vent on the outside. The vent on my house had a screen behind the flap, which is not appropriate for a dryer vent but ok for a bathroom fan. Removing the screen fixed the constant clogging behavior in my system.



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