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The purpose of a bathroom exhaust fan or bathroom window is to vent humid air outdoors. When I bought my house, it did not have a bathroom fan. I had grown up in a house with a bathroom fan, and thought perhaps it wasn't necessary to vent the moisture, after all, since it didn't make sense to me to open the window in the winter. I was wrong. After a year ...


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Why do you use a bathroom vent fan? To remove moisture. Why remove moisture? Moisture penetrates latex paint and sheetrock. Ceiling sheetrock will retain so much moisture, you can see the paper backing is damp. As I found out much to my chagrin way back when I had to open up the wall on a bathroom that had a long failed power vent (black mold). Needless to ...


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You will all be happy to hear that I've recently run the hose to an exterior vent.


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I recently installed a vent fan in a bathroom that my kids use. I hooked it up to the electrical line used for the lights in the bathroom so that the fan would go on when someone turned on the lights. I was able to cut out a 4" hole in the roof right above the bathroom for the vent hose and installed a vent cap on the roof. It is best to vent to a location ...


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If you live in an area covered by International Residential Code; or similar building codes, it's required that the fan exhaust to the outdoors. See this answer, for exact code verbiage.


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IMO, and IME, bathroom fans should always be vented outside. Bathrooms are one of the biggest (if not the biggest) producer or water vapor in your home. When water vapor is trapped is can cause things like mold, mildew, damage to furniture, added difficulty in conditioning the air, and many more. Just because a bathroom vent is not currently vented to the ...


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As you just noted gas exhaust flues get "pretty hot". Which is the reason they should not be in contact with combustible material. Also they need to be 'double walled' if they are passing through an enclosed surface. Also be sure the vents terminate to the outside, but not in close proximity to any windows or return air registers.


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Buy a 5" holesaw (and a drill sturdy enough to drive it). Cut a 5" hole in a big chunk of plywood. Screw/nail/clamp the plywood in the place where you want the hole. Drill away. If you're having a hard time with the drill binding and trying to twist your wrist off, run it in reverse. It's much slower, but you won't have the same problem. Couple more tips: ...


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If you can't get a center pilot drill to guide the cut, you can guide it by the outside edge: Get the 5" holesaw. Use it to cut a hole out of a board or piece of plywood (or several pieces of plywood stacked and screwed-and-glued together). Center this 5" hole over the 4" hole, and temporarily anchor it firmly in place somehow (a few nails or screws, ...


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In my experience, I tool bought one a DIY 8 foot cleaner that is actually fiberglass and comes with 4 two foot sections that attached to a 4 inch brush. The problem here is you MUST only go a few inches at a time an pull back to the point of exiting. If you drive the entire length, you are only packing all the lint to a point that may be open or screen ...


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I'm not sure why you want to divert the vent, as rain and birds are not much of a concern when it comes to plumbing vents. Getting rain into the vent is not a problem, as the vent leads to the sewer. The amount of water that will end up down the vent during a rain storm is trivial, and won't hurt anything at all. I've heard of birds falling down ...


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You really don't want the vent pipe opening near a window, because of the possibility of the sewer odor coming back into the house. That's why vents are on the roof in the first place — any breeze quickly carries the odors away. To answer your specific question, yes, vent pipes can have horizontal runs, as long as there is no possibility of them ...



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