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Could be that the repair isn't well sealed to the roof, allowing water to come down the outside of the vent pipe. Or the spring loaded flap that's supposed to seal it when the exhaust fan isn't on is not closing properly... either because it's a cheap piece of junk or it is damaged. You may be able to spot the second possibility with binoculars, etc from ...


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Any leak can rot the building, ruin insulation, cause electrical shorts, and cause mold. Water and any part of houses other than the inside of the plumbing don't mix, in general. Since this is the bathroom fan vent, you have immediate potential for electrical/water interaction.


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My understanding of building code relevant to the US is that an attached garage area must provide a fire barrier (not firewall) from any living space. A quick search shows how effective this regulation is at preventing relatively serious garage fires from engulfing a home. Piercing that fire block and providing a direct path to the attic is a terrible idea. ...


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Ah, how I hate people who build things designed to last forever, or rather to need the house ripped apart when they don't. I'd try a loop of wire (galvanized steel or aluminum, whichever the duct is, so they don't corrode each other over time) wrapped around the pipe in the hole to allow you to pull on that while shoving the stub pipe into the elbow. Look ...


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There is way more radiant heat being put into a roof that one or two little attic fans can ever pull out of the attic to be effective. They would have to be about 4 feet in diameter or more to effectively remove that amount of heat radiated into the attic. There is just too much surface area heated by the sun on a typical roof for any small fan to handle. ...



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