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Definitely keep the garage attic fan (and install one in the house if appropriate). The one change I would make is to upgrade the fan (or convert it) to run on solar power. It's only needed on hot days anyway, which often have more than enough sun to run the fan. A nice simple first solar project!


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The fan is meant to remove excessively hot air to make the air conditioning less expensive. The exhausted attic air should be replaced by air from outside, not from inside the house. The garage ceiling should be (mostly) sealed to prevent air movement between the attic and garage. Unless it is a structure built before about 1960. Also, the attic fan ...


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Negative pressure in your garage is far more likely to be relieved through flimsy overhead door seals than from inside the adjacent home (presumably through the service door weather seals alone). However, it's probably not doing you much economic good to have a fan running in the garage attic. What little energy you save conditioning your home (with its ...


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Do not buy a bathroom fan, as they are generally rated to run no more than an hour or so at a time. You want a fan that's rated for continuous operation. Do make sure your attic has sufficient ventilation area that you don't generate any back pressure. Similarly, figure out some way to get plenty of air into the closet, e.g. a screen panel in the door. ...


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I'd have no concerns at all in doing this, assuming a well-ventilated attic. Be sure you have a functioning backflow preventer to keep cold air out in winter. Being more dense, it'll have a tendency to fall into the room.


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This is a horrible problem to have, and yet you will encounter many who will insinuate that you are crazy for suggesting it. Hold strong: you are not crazy. The problem is real. More insulation is not always better in all situations for all climates at all times of year irrespective of ventilation. Ignore people who claim this. They have never personally ...


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Just sharing my personal experience with a bubbly toilet when running the sink. (It was only the sink, as the shower uses a different drainage system.) Long story short: The cause was a drainage pipe that the "seasoned" plumbers installed at an upward angle. I placed an old chunk of wood under it to level it out, and, voila! - no more bubbles singing smelly ...



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