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18

NO!!! The vent will expand and contract and break the glass. You need to go through the cinder blocks (preferable, but if you must, go through the concrete). Also, with double paned glass, there is usually an inert gas (or Nitrogen) sealed in between the panes. Drilling it will break the seal. My advice: Get someone to do it for you. It is unlikely you ...


14

Any electrical socket in a bathroom must have GFCI protection. You're damp, you touch something with a ground fault, feel a slight tickle and wake up wearing a halo and wings. Of all places to hack together power supplies, a bathroom is absolutely the worst place to do this. Mystical theories about the heater protecting the strip from dampness don't remove ...


13

Calculating Cubic Feet The first step in determining what size exhaust fan is needed, is to calculate the volume of the room. To do this, you'll simply multiply the length of the room times the width of the room time the height of the room. Length = 10 ft. Width = 8 ft. Height = 8 ft. 10 ft. * 8 ft. * 8 ft. = 640 ft.3 Calculate ...


12

You can probably do it yourself cheaper than hiring it out. You could try something like this vent cleaning system. It seems to have fairly good reviews on Amazon, and for $25 it's worth a shot. It claims to have a 12' reach and the ability to navigate turns in the vent, so you may have to go at the last 3' from the other end. Note: You'll need a drill to ...


12

Since yours vents into your attic space I would never use it either. Probably the biggest use of a bathroom vent fan is to help keep mold down in bathrooms, especially in humid areas. Lots of lawsuits against housing tracks have happened in humid areas where builders just put the cheapest fan in and a couple years later the residents find mold. Most ...


12

They sell inline lint traps, that can be installed along the exhaust vent. This should catch most; if not all of the excess lint, and give you a convenient easy way to clean the lint. The lint should be cleaned often (along with the dryers internal lint trap), to increase dryer efficiency and decrease the chance of fire. Keep in mind, these are ...


12

I don't know your location, but in the USA, it is strictly forbidden to run any electrical wiring through heating vents or any air handling plenum. The reason for this is that you now have a combustible material in the plenum, that can spread a fire between rooms and into wall cavities. As previously mentioned, any AC electrical outlets in a bathroom MUST ...


12

You're mixing grease with lint, which is only going to make a mess and clog up in no time. You could also create a situation where dryer exhaust goes back into your house instead of outside, causing excessive humidity and a mold/mildew risk. The workaround for that would be to install dampers, but those would likely get jammed with the grease/lint ...


11

It's not necessary, they probably just put it in because it was easy to do and gives you the option of heating the garage if you want. I would keep the vent closed, and if you want an even better seal, the make magnetic pads that you can put over the vent as well


11

Vented air from the dryer is full of moisture since it contains water from the clothing being dried. Do not vent it into your crawlspace or basement since you will definitely have moisture problems. After you vent it outside, run the dryer and put your hand over the vent and you will see what I mean.


10

Before you do anything, you must figure out where it goes. It really has to vent outside. If it vents into the attic, you are going to have serious issues, including the potential of mold and rot as the hot, moist air is vented into an unconditioned space. It is (usually) against building codes to vent into the attic for this reason. If it is venting ...


10

Dryer vent air is full of water vapor and dust. I wouldn't want to blow it into my house. I do not know how much heat (BTU's) a dryer outputs during a run but it seems like it would be a small amount, and of course most people don't run their dryer very often - maybe a handful of times a week.


10

That pipe looks like an air intake. All "direct vent" style appliances (high efficiency on-demand water heater, gas fireplace, etc.) have an isolated air intake and it is common to have it suck in air from outside the building so as not to force air infiltration through doors, windows, etc. Indeed, that is ugly. Our fireplace and tankless water heater ...


9

Soffit Pros Vent easier to install In heavy snow areas, not likely to be blocked Cons Soffits are designed for intake, so it's possible the air will be sucked back into the attic Moist air can collect under the soffit Roof Pros Heat and moisture want to rise Keeps moisture away from walls, windows, siding Cons Can be blocked with heavy snow ...


9

If your bathroom doesn't have a window and no fan then that all that moist air is going to create a perfect environment for mold and other unpleasant things. Also, excessive humidity will probably make it's way into your walls and I you have a wooden house then it will start to rot. That's why it's a bad idea for a vent to exhaust to the attic. It's just ...


9

What you show in the picture is known as a One-way Breather Vent (there are also two-way). Its intended purpose is to provide pressure equalization throughout the roof system and also provides ventilation for the insulation system. In some buildings that do not have a vapor barrier (even some that do), pressure changes inside the building can be forced ...


8

In general, the shorter the vent, the better, so moving the dryer next to the basement wall would be the optimal solution. If you can't do that, then moving the vent as you said would be a lot better than your current set-up. This article covers the whole topic in a lot of detail, see especially the sections on why to keep the length as short as possible: ...


7

The natural flow of air in an attic is going to be pulling air in through the soffit vents and out through the roof vents/ridge vent. The problem I see with exausting the air through a soffit vent is that the natural flow is going to tend to pull that moist air right back in through the soffit vents and into the attic again. Given that the air flow ...


7

There are various degrees of a "zoned" HVAC system. A simple zoned system will include motorized dampers in the ducts to direct air where it is needed. e.g. If one room is too cold, but the other ones are fine, the system will shut the dampers to the other rooms, and then fire up the heater so just the one room is heated. More sophisticated zoning systems ...


7

For a quick and dirty fix, I have had some success with a Register Booster Fan. This has alleviated most of the problem in my house. I still plan to install more insulation (and upgrade to a multi-zone system), but this is a lot less work up front. You can use it as a stop gap until you figure out what permanent fixes you need to make.


7

If the furnace and water heater are gas powered, it would be to provide adequate airflow for their combustion so that you don't get carbon monoxide forming in the utility room. Here's a link with some information. An excerpt: The heating appliances are fully isolated from the living space with partitions. Figure 1 provides two vents to the outside, ...


7

Whether you tape it or otherwise block it, the effect will be the same and it will not cause any damage to your system; it would be no different than if there was a standard register there that was closed. The only thing I'll note is that duct tape will eventually dry up and fall off. Ideally you would use foil HVAC tape Unlike duct tape, this will not ...


6

I would probably use some rigid foam insulation (2 or 3" is probably good, it's generally rated at R7 per inch - and you can stack it, it doesn't have to be a solid piece), and then use spray foam to seal it up around the edges and hold it in place. It looks like a metal sill all the way around, so that's going to cause a lot of heat transfer anyways - ...


6

You're supposed to clean your dryer duct once a year or so to prevent a fire hazard. The standard thing to clean a dryer duct is a brush with a long flexible handle. They make ones specifically sized for dryer ducts. Here is a typical one: Disconnect your dryer and push the vent into the duct. Run it back and forth a few times. Keep a vacuum handy. ...


6

Your attic definitely does need ventilation. However, it seems really odd to me that it is vented down into your garage. Is there any kind of gas powered appliances nearby? If not, I would: Install some roof vents and maybe an attic fan. Install soffit vents or some way for air to get in. (you want to create a FLOW all the way through your attic) ...


6

You could vent out the wall with one of these guys (Louvered Exhaust Vent) Or out the roof with one of these (Roof vent cap) Either way, your inspector is correct. Blowing warm moist air into the attic is probably not the best idea. It's also not a good idea to vent out the wall too close to the soffit vents, as the exhaust will just be sucked back ...


6

IANAP (I Am Not A Plumber) but I have recently replaced my old cast iron stack. The relevant part of the International Plumbing Code looks like section 904. Specifically the following sections may apply to you. 904.1 Roof extension. All open vent pipes that extend through a roof shall be terminated at least [NUMBER] inches (mm) above the roof, except ...


6

They make Dryer Vent Cleaning Kits for this very purpose: As to why there is water in there - hopefully it's just condensation.



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