Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

I would recommend a "mohair" roller. This is a very short nap, lintless roller cover that applies varnish and urethanes fast and extremely smoothly. I don't like pads at all, as they always seem to streak.


4

Varnish is usually a mixture of a drying oil, some resin such as pine tar, and a solvent such as turpentine. The drying oil most likely won't kill you. The most commonly used oil, linseed oil, is actually just non-food-grade flax oil by another name. The Greeks put pine tar in their wine, and it's a tasty treat. The solvent is a little more troublesome. ...


3

Yes (with some prep), however, you can try lightly sanding with 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper. Use it lightly wetted. Buff dry with a soft cloth. You may find this is matte enough.. DONE! If its too matte (flat) you are now prepped and ready to recoat with satin or matte.


3

Test it first. You may be able to just stain the filler as is. If that does not work, dig out the existing filler with whatever tool works (putty knife, old drill bit, a thick nail) and replace it with something you can stain. Not sure if paint stripper works on filler, but it's work a short. If there's any other stains or treatments on the door though, ...


3

I've used the steel wool + vinegar method before*. It's essentially a stain so really only affects the surface layer. It shouldn't have any meaningful affect on the strength of the piece of wood. Splitting and warping is related to moisture and drying so wouldn't really be affecting by weathering stain. After you weather it, note that most any additional ...


3

Razor scrapper would work best with a little mineral spirits.


3

Now you know why varnish is rarely used anymore. If it is pure varnish/shellac, then damage to the wood is likely. Before sanding and refinishing, the nuclear option is to try to rub it out with denatured alcohol. The alcohol will dissolve the varnish and redistribute or remove it. You can then touch up the varnish carefully. If it is lacquer, then use ...


3

I've had friends who have put up metal kick/decorative plates and their dog/cat has still managed to scratch it up over time. Your best bet is to do something that is easily replaceable, whether that be painting or a quick changeable kickplate. Like shirlock said .... your dog is gonna scratch it .... dogs are persistent (yet lovable) in that way.


3

Hey Niall, Several coats (4-5?) of a good oil based urethane is gonna be the best protection, but even that is gonna show dog scratches eventually and won't protect the raised panel details that will get rounded over by Fido. Short of a protective barrier, like a piece of thin plexi, I don't know of a thing that will hold up to repetitive scratching, sorry.


2

The main issue would be with covering any nail/screw holes after you've fixed it to the wall. Other than that I can't see a problem with varnishing before hand. As each coat of varnish darkens the wood you could end up with a darker patch over each nail. However, using the same approach as usual - leaving the last coat until after installation will reduce ...


2

It is very unusual for Urethane to Buckle or alligator skin when applied over urethane. The reason for this type of failure is usually a contaminate on the surface. Grease, oil, wax etc. Did you use the same type of urethane from the same lot? After sanding, did you clean the dust off with a cloth that may have had some contaminates on it? I always use a ...


1

I would use Oxalic acid (in deck "brightners") before using bleach. Bleach not only breaks down color, but accelerates wood deterioration. Be sure to neutralize as directed; with borax diluted in water or bicarbonate of soda in water.


1

As @bib says in his comment, the purpose of the finish is really dependent on what the wood is being used for. Most wood finishes will provided at least a little protection from drying and abrasion, but other than that it's really application specific. (By the way you use the word "varnish", which is a specific category of wood finishes, but there are many ...


1

Generally speaking, varnish makes the wood look pretty and shiny and protects it from water although the protection is not perfect. A much better explanation can be found in the book Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner. It has been through several editions so your local public library should have a copy. He debunks a lot of myths and is pretty ...


1

I would not let the bugs remain either, If it is cold outside where you are now as it is here in MD USA, the warm inside temps will make the bugs quite active again. I had that happen with a cherry burl I was turning, luckily I put it in a large clear plastic bag solely for the purpose of slowing moisture loss to reduce checking. After a few days I checked ...


1

I really doubt you can sand your floors. Some engineered floors can be but this is a very small percent. And this would be a diy because pros won't want to be responsible for the thin top layer sanding through. One of the things I have found with engineered hardwood is the clear coat varies drastically from different types. I have tested a lot and some ...


1

Ok, I did the metric to inches conversions so I understand the size of your project. Sure wish the USA would go metric like the rest of the civilized world. LOL. Your bench is going to be apx 7 foot by 2 foot with 17 inch overhangs. I think you will find that a solid stable material like 20 mm (3/4inch) plywood, medium density fiberboard (MDF) or solid ...


1

I put a couple of coats on with the pad and it left bubbles on the surface. I ended up using a brush the same width as the floorboards I'd sanded (about 6 inches) and it made a much nicer finish. Some tips: Apply the varnish along the grain Try to paint a whole board in one go, as the varnish dries and leaves marks at the area where you apply it next ...


1

As the other answers have mentioned, I don't think there is a real solution. Our dog would scratch/chew at the bedroom door (solid wood, probably original from 1926) when we are gone and would take chunks out of it along with big scratchs. Luckily it was painted white so we were able to just use wood filler to patch it and repaint and you can't see the ...


1

I always prefinish stained, urethaned or varnished trim when possible. Finishing trim on a flat horizontal surface really helps in reducing runs and drips. With a little effort, you can mix a couple of colors of wood filler to match whatever color you have on your trim. Just don't go crazy with the finish nailer and turn your trim into swiss cheese! LOL. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible