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Most of the time in a house in Canada you would have 6-10mil plastic over the drywall in the ceiling. However the answer isn't that easy and the vapor barrier isn't needed for sure. It also depends on the type of insulation that you have (faced or not), what other types of barriers are installed in your attic, and really what is on the rest of your ...


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Possibly dig (or have someone else, with equipment, dig) around the outside and put in a curtain drain to lower the water table in the immediate vicinity of the garage. Or lay a barrier on the surface and add a 2 inch (or so) topcoat over it.


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Skip the 2x3 studs. If you are going to build "nearly SIPs" you'll get a better (lighter, stronger, better insulated) product if you just build (or buy) SIPs and build with SIP methods. Modern construction adhesives make this far more practical as a DIY project than it used to be, though getting them factory built should not be overly difficult or expensive. ...


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Perhaps I'll simplify this and use 11/32 sheathing so I can apply housewrap around that, and then whatever siding I wish (perhaps T&G cedar). It'll probably add 500-600 lbs to the walls, but it sounds like it'll simplify it a bit and be worth it.


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Didn't you ask the same question somewhere else recently? This sounds really familiar. You should stick to proven wall designs. 2x3s are going to be more difficult to work with. No sheathing will mean virtually no racking resistance against wind. You almost never want a dedicated vapor barrier, especially if you're planning to use rigid foam anywhere (that ...


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There are no red flags that I see in your question. I don't like drylocking walls that will be covered in basements for the simple fact that if water hits concrete I would rather it go through the concrete than sit in the concrete (where if it freezes then expands will help promote larger cracks). But you have 15 years there and nothing so good for you and ...



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