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10

I too, was in search of Tuck Tape at Home Depot / Lowe's and couldn't find it. When I asked a salesman about it, they didn't understand what I was looking for. When I said I wanted to seal the edges of vapor barrier, they told me to use the Tyvek tape, the same one you found. Duct tape won't cut it; it's too porous. We used the Tyvek and it's worked well ...


6

At this point, it's not a DIY project. You need to consult an engineer or an architect/engineer that is used to these kind of building envelopes. A sealed envelope with an ERV needs to be designed and PROPERLY sealed, and the ERV capacity needs to be determined and designed by an engineer in order to meet building code and pass inspections. Note: I'm in TX ...


6

Most crawl spaces are vented if they have an earth floor or are prone to moisture. If you insulate between the floor joists with a moisture, mold and vermin resistant insulation (foam as we discussed before) you would still want some ventilation. The only time I would seal the exterior walls would be if I also used a pretty darn water tight moisture barrier ...


6

Yes vapor barriers are to prevent condensation inside of insulation, greatly reducing its efficiency. In your climate, if you use air conditioning and that space has insulated exterior walls, you will want a vapor barrier on the exterior side of the insulation to prevent outside humidity from condensing inside the cooler insulation. If your exterior walls ...


4

Since you're going to have the walls open, I would use pre-faced fiberglass batting. The rolls give you more flexibility than the pre-cut batts if you have non-standard height walls and they're usually a little cheaper per square foot, but I see special offers in the big-box stores all the time so shop around. There's no special trick to installing it, but ...


4

not 100% certain on this, but a double vapor barrier will actually cause harm as the moisture will have no where to escape to. Especially if you place it on the non-faced side. If you place it on the already faced side, it probably wont hurt, but is pointless as you already have the barrier .


4

Your builder is an idiot. That is just plain lazy. Yep, Goo Gone, or maybe some mineral spirits. As a last resort if the aforementioned don't work, try acetone. Acetone dissolves most glues, but also can damage the finish. Test a small area first.


4

Typically, nothing is done. That puncture should be at a tight connection of drywall to stud, where airflow is impeded by the pressure of the screw holding the drywall and vapor barrier to the stud. The vapor barrier isn't an impermeable seal, it just dramatically reduces movement of air and vapor between interior space and exterior walls.


4

Karl is right on with his advise to consult an HVAC expert to help you with this situation. I agree that the foam is far superior to batt fiberglass and worth the extra cost. There will be several considerations such as types of fuels used in the home, ie; gas range, fireplace etc. Other items worth a look are possible Radon, window and door schedule. Your ...


4

I think you'll have to get one of these vapor barrier boxes, and fit it before installing your electrical box. Seal up where the cable penetrates, then install your electrical box. The other options would be to cut a larger hole and patch drywall, or seal it up from the back side (but that would require access to the other side of the wall/ceiling).


4

I'll answer the second question first: Where would I go looking for any such information for my location? Your city's building and code inspector's office. But note that because something is to code doesn't necessarily mean it has to be done that way--provided you can show why your way is better. Which leads to your first question: Does anyone ...


3

Nope, it shouldn't cause problems with moisture buildup -- but how much blown in fiberglass do you have up there? If it's less than your roof joists, it's not enough, and you should think about adding some (or a lot, actually) to bring you up to R-30 at the least in your attic. If you do have that much up there, but you moved some to the side to put down ...


3

Presumably you are going to have heat early/late in the season, when it gets cold at night. If you ever want to heat the cottage in the winter, it's also significantly easier to do now than it is later. I would install a vapour barrier in this case. It's needed when warm meets cold; in cold climates, on the warm side, to prevent moisture from forming ...


3

You can try using some Goof Off for removing the residue.


3

I have a few questions and observations that will effect what you should do. First, I see that the peak (ridge) seems to be over the existing framed and drywalled wall. What is on the other side of this wall? Is this garage attached to the house or free standing? Do you have or intend to put any heat or heat dump register in this space? I also noticed ...


3

I prefer fiberglass batting over blown-in insulation because it's not as messy, you don't have to rent a machine to do it so you can do it at your own pace, and if you need to do any subsequent work in the attic, it's easier to move it out of the way then move it back again later. I'm not sure about the relative cost, but I frequently see special offers ...


3

I completely disagree with BMitch here. If you live in an area with sustained freezing temperatures, you should have a plastic vapor barrier between the drywall and the studs, wherever "warm meets cold" (exterior walls, top floor ceiling). You want this vapor barrier inside your insulation so the barrier is toward the "warm" side of the thermal break ...


3

IMO you are making several leaps here that don't fit. You've got mold below a window, spread out about 2 feet on either side, and you suspect condensation as the culprit. You specify that the damage is old - years old by the look of it. Condensation happens every year, every season. Why would the damage be old, it should be fresh if it's condensation. ...


3

It is a good idea to seal any apertures between the crawlspace and the main house. If you have to rely on caulk and spray foam you're probably in a situation where the house has some weird structural problems - that is, you should not have giant gaps between the crawlspace and the floor above in any normal construction regimen. It is not a good idea to ...


3

No, there's no need to install a vapor barrier between two conditioned spaces. The purpose of a vapor barrier is to prevent warm moist air from traveling through the insulation and condensing on the cooler side, which can easily happen in cold climates. With a conditioned space on both sides, you can allow any moisture in the air to pass through. There's ...


3

Yep, the 120 year old houses do make life more interesting (and expensive and/or colder.) Use an air barrier that is NOT a vapor barrier. More commonly known as housewrap. Vapor moves through, but bulk air movement is reduced. For insulating inside the floor joists, either blown-in cellulose (which supposedly has very little issue with vapor, due to having ...


3

Ask yourself this: "If I install a vapor barrier, where is the water that it stops going to collect?" If you put a polyethylene vapor barrier behind a drywall-covered stud framed wall, then the answer is that water that condenses on the poly will fall onto the wood sill plate, growing mold and eventually rotting it out. Dedicated vapor barriers have no ...


2

Water could condense on the inside of the vapor barrier, which is what you don't want to happen.


2

Check the directions/specifications of your exhaust fan, it should say if it is rated to have insulation next to or on top of it. It would probably be a good idea to seal the vapour barrier back around the fan.


2

No, you only want a single vapor barrier. A second vapor barrier would create a moisture trap that would cause more mold issues. If there's a condensation issue, I'd replace the section of HVAC ducts with an insulated duct. The insulation inside the duct prevents the outside metal part of the duct from getting cold enough to result in condensation.


2

Increasing your wall thickness to facilitate 6in insulation is a fine idea, can't hurt. A vapor barrier of 4 mil plastic with taped seams should always be installed between the insulation and drywall. this will stop moisture from the outside from penetrating the back of the drywall and conversely, humidity from inside collecting in the insulation. T111 ...


2

Rigid foam insulation is usually a qualified vapor barrier. However, an installation between the studs can pose a challenge. To complete the vapor barrier you would want to foam-seal or tape all the sides where the rigid meets timber, because these gaps will facilitate vapor flow.


2

Just doing some repairs on my (Canadian) house and it uses black foam glue (the tube said "acoustic foam") around the edges and nails with an L shaped right angle head along the studs



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